Background Image

The Beacon May 1, 2014 : Page 1

Outreach, training programs listed for center Inauguration for CSE’s president held 2 N EWSPAPER OF THE D IOCESE M AY 1, 2014 OF P ATERSON , N. J. N O . 15 V OL . 48 > > 13 John Paul II, John XXIII are officially declared saints Same-day canonization witnessed by two popes makes Church history By ELISE HARRIS CNA/EWTN News VATICAN CITY — Church history was made in St. Peter’s Square, which was filled to over-flowing on Divine Mercy Sunday, April 27, as Pope Francis officially declared former pontiffs John Paul II and John XXIII as saints. “For the honor of the Blessed Trinity, the exaltation of the Catholic faith and the in-crease of the Christian life, by the authority of our Lord Jesus Christ and of the Holy Apostles Peter and Paul and having sought the council of many of our brother bishops, we declare and define Blessed John XXIII and John Paul II be saints,” Pope Francis exclaimed as the crowd cheered enthusiastically. “We enroll them among the saints, decree-ing that they are to be venerated as such by the whole Church. In the name of the Father, and of the Son, and of the Holy Spirit.” Sunday marked the first time in Church history that two popes were canonized on the same day and the first time that two popes were at the canonization ceremony. Seated alongside the cardinals in attendance was Pope Emeritus Benedict XVI, making this the first Mass in Church history concelebrat-ed by a pope and his predecessor. Nearly 800,000 pilgrims flooded the Vatican on Divine Mercy Sunday to celebrate the highly anticipated canonizations with over-flow crowds watching on giant-screen TVs set up at various locations around the city. The square and the broad Via della Conciliazione leading up to it were tightly packed with pil-grims, many of whom had been standing for See Church history on Page 9 DIOCESE CELEBRATES CHURCH’S NEWEST SAINTS — Bishop Serratelli celebrates Mass on Divine Mercy Sunday, April 27, at Pope John XXIII Regional High School, Sparta, to mark the canonization of the newest saints that day by Pope Francis in Rome: Pope John XXIII, the school’s namesake and new patron saint, and Pope John Paul II. Concelebrating, along with dozens of priests from the diocese, is Msgr. James Mahoney, diocesan vicar general, moderator of the Curia, and pastor of Corpus Christi Parish, Chatham Township. Beacon photo / Joe Gigli Bishop marks canonization of Church’s newest saints at April 27 Mass at Pope John XXIII H.S. By MICHAEL WOJCIK News Editor SPARTA — On Divine Mercy Sunday, April 27, Bishop Serratelli celebrated a Mass to commemorate the historic canonization that day in Rome of the two newest saints: St. John XXIII and St. John Paul II — two coura-geous men, who profoundly influenced the Church in their pontifcates. The bishop fo-cused his homily during the liturgy — held at Pope John XXIII Regional High School here — on the school’s new patron saint, noting that his “joy and sense of humor were signs of his deep faith.” Leaders and other faithful from around the Paterson Diocese, including priests, religious and laity, and members of Pope John’s school community, including current and former ad-ministration, faculty, students and parents, filled the auditorium to overflowing for the 3 p.m. Mass. Although the liturgy commem-orated the canonization of both St. John and St. John Paul by Pope Francis at the Vatican, the school community especially held St. John — its namesake — close in their hearts. In 1964, Pope John became the first Catholic high school in the U.S. named in honor of the late pontiff. “Today, we praise and magnify the great gift to the Church: the two new saints of St. John Paul and St. John,” said Bishop Serratelli, main celebrant and homilist of the Mass that he presided over with Bishop Emeritus Rodimer; Msgr. Kieran McHugh, Pope John’s president; Msgr. James Mahoney, diocesan vicar general and pastor of Corpus Christi Parish, Chatham Township; and dozens of other priests from around the dio-cese. Today, Catholics mainly remember St. John for convening the Second Vatican Council that enacted sweeping reforms that modernized the Church. But the late pon-tiff also enjoyed making the occasional hu-morous remark — “one liners.” “Pope John could have been called the patron of come-dians,” Bishop Serratelli said. St. John once joked that “Italians come to ruin in one of three ways — with women, See Mass on Page 8 DO NOT DELAY — TIME SENSITIVE NEWS Faithful recall fond memories of St. John Paul II By CECILE SAN AGUSTIN Reporter CLIFTON — As the universal Church cele-brated the canonization of Pope John Paul II on Divine Mercy Sunday, many from around the diocese recalled fond memories of meeting and seeing the beloved pope. He came to the Paterson Diocese in 1976 when he was Cardinal Karol Wojtyla, arch-bishop of Krakow. The saint visited Holy Rosary Church in Passaic, which was desig-nated by Bishop Serratelli as the site of the diocesan shrine to John Paul II in 2012. The shrine is located in an area where all people can come to pray to the Church’s newest saint. For the Polish community of Holy Rosary, it is an especially meaningful shrine. Many Polish faithful were moved by the historic event of John Paul II’s canoniza-tion including Father Zbigniew Tyburski, pas-tor of Ss. Cyril and Methodius Parish in Boonton, who traveled to Rome to witness the canonization. “It was very important for me to be there because Pope John Paul II has made a tremendous impact on my life,” said Father Tyburski. “I met the pope twice and I re-member those moments.” Father Tyburski, also wanted to be pres-ent, especially since he is a professor at Seton See St. John Paul II on Page 16 O BITUARIES Y OUTH V IEWPOINT W HAT T O D O C LASSIFIEDS 3 6-7 10-11-12 13 14-15

John Paul II, John XXIII Are Officially Declared Saints

Elise Harris

Same-day canonization witnessed by two popes makes Church history

VATICAN CITY — Church history was made in St. Peter’s Square, which was filled to overflowing on Divine Mercy Sunday, April 27, as Pope Francis officially declared former pontiffs John Paul II and John XXIII as saints.

“For the honor of the Blessed Trinity, the exaltation of the Catholic faith and the increase of the Christian life, by the authority of our Lord Jesus Christ and of the Holy Apostles Peter and Paul and having sought the council of many of our brother bishops, we declare and define Blessed John XXIII and John Paul II be saints,” Pope Francis exclaimed as the crowd cheered enthusiastically.

“We enroll them among the saints, decreeing that they are to be venerated as such by the whole Church. In the name of the Father, and of the Son, and of the Holy Spirit.”

Sunday marked the first time in Church history that two popes were canonized on the same day and the first time that two popes were at the canonization ceremony. Seated alongside the cardinals in attendance was Pope Emeritus Benedict XVI, making this the first Mass in Church history concelebrated by a pope and his predecessor.

Nearly 800,000 pilgrims flooded the Vatican on Divine Mercy Sunday to celebrate the highly anticipated canonizations with overflow crowds watching on giant-screen Tvs set up at various locations around the city. The square and the broad Via della Conciliazione leading up to it were tightly packed with pilgrims, many of whom had been standing for hours before the start of Mass. Among the many national flags on display, the majority were from Poland, the native land of St. John Paul. The Vatican said 93 countries sent official delegations to the Mass, and more than 30 of the delegations were led by a president or prime minister.

During the canonization ceremony, which took place at the beginning of the Mass relics of the new saints in matching silver reliquaries were carried to Pope Francis who kissed them before they were placed on a small table for veneration by the congregation.

St. John’s relic was a piece of the late pope’s skin, removed when his body was transferred to its present tomb in the main sanctuary of St. Peter’s Basilica.

Floribeth Mora Diaz, a Costa Rican woman whose recovery from a brain aneurysm was recognized by the Church as a miracle attributable to the intercession of St. John Paul, brought up a silver reliquary containing some of the saint’s blood, taken from him for medical testing shortly before his death in 2005.

The canonizations of both popes came after extraordinary measures by their successors to expedite the process. Pope Benedict waived the usual five-year waiting period before the start of a sainthood cause for Pope John Paul shortly after his death, when he was mourned by crowds shouting “Santo subito!” (“A saint at once!”). In the case of St. John, Pope Francis waived the usual requirement of a second miracle before a Blessed can added to the Church’s canon of saints.

Pope John XXIII was born in Sotto il Monte, a diocese and province of Bergamo, Italy, Nov. 25, 1881 as fourth of 13 children. He was elected pope Oct. 28, 1958.

Known as “Good Pope John,” he is most remembered for his historic encyclical “Pacem in Terris,” and for his calling of the Second Vatican Council.

He was declared Blessed by Pope John Paul II Sept. 3, 2000, during celebration of the Great Jubilee Year in 2000, and was approved for canonization by Pope Francis last July.

St. John Paul II is perhaps one of the most well-known pontiffs in recent history, and is most remembered for his charismatic nature, his love of youth and his world travels, along with his role in the fall of communism in Europe during his 27-year papacy.

The cherished Polish pope died in 2005, marking his 2011 beatification as one of the quickest in recent Church history, and is the first pope to be beatified by his immediate successor.

In an April 24 message sent to both the Church in Poland and the diocese of Bergamo, Italy, Pope Francis thanked each for the great “gift” of the saints for the Church and for the world, saying of John Paul II that he is grateful, “as all the members of the people of God, for his untiring service, his spiritual guidance, and for his extraordinary testimony of holiness.”

Speaking of St. John XXIII’s historic calling of the Second Vatican Council in order to address a pastoral response to the presence of the Church in the modern world, the pope said, “The renewal desired from the Second Vatican Council has opened the road.”

It is “a special joy that the canonization of Pope John XXIII takes place together with that of John Paul II,” he continued, adding that “this renewal was brought forward in his long pontificate.”

Read the full article at http://www.evergreeneditions.com/article/John+Paul+II%2C+John+XXIII+Are+Officially+Declared+Saints/1699863/207583/article.html.

Bishop Marks Canonization Of Church’s Newest Saints At April 27 Mass At Pope John XXII H.S.

Michael Wojcik

SPARTA — On Divine Mercy Sunday, April 27, Bishop Serratelli celebrated a Mass to commemorate the historic canonization that day in Rome of the two newest saints: St. John XXIII and St. John Paul II — two courageous men, who profoundly influenced the Church in their pontifcates. The bishop focused his homily during the liturgy — held at Pope John XXIII Regional High School here — on the school’s new patron saint, noting that his “joy and sense of humor were signs of his deep faith.”

Leaders and other faithful from around the Paterson Diocese, including priests, religious and laity, and members of Pope John’s school community, including current and former administration, faculty, students and parents, filled the auditorium to overflowing for the 3 p.m. Mass. Although the liturgy commemorated the canonization of both St. John and St. John Paul by Pope Francis at the Vatican, the school community especially held St. John — its namesake — close in their hearts. In 1964, Pope John became the first Catholic high school in the U.S. named in honor of the late pontiff.

“Today, we praise and magnify the great gift to the Church: the two new saints of St. John Paul and St. John,” said Bishop Serratelli, main celebrant and homilist of the Mass that he presided over with Bishop Emeritus Rodimer; Msgr. Kieran McHugh, Pope John’s president; Msgr. James Mahoney, diocesan vicar general and pastor of Corpus Christi Parish, Chatham Township; and dozens of other priests from around the diocese.

Today, Catholics mainly remember St. John for convening the Second Vatican Council that enacted sweeping reforms that modernized the Church. But the late pontiff also enjoyed making the occasional humorous remark — “one liners.” “Pope John could have been called the patron of comedians,” Bishop Serratelli said.

St. John once joked that “Italians come to ruin in one of three ways — with women, with gambling or with farming. My family chose the slowest one [farming].” At a state dinner, he offered an attractive women, wearing a short skirt, an apple, and told her, “Take it. Only after Eve took the apple did she realize how little [clothing] she had on.”

“The Lord was present to St. John, when all was lost, which is what our faith is all about. Faith was the guiding light of his entire life,” said Bishop Serratelli during the Mass, which included readings and prayers by members of the Pope John community and hymns of praise by the school’s choir and accompanying musicians. “Pope John’s joy and sense of humor were signs of his deep faith. Only a man who believed that we are headed for the glory of heaven could joke and have so much joy,” he said.

The historic Mass at Pope John recognized the lives and ministries of two remarkable popes: “St. John, who called the historic Second Vatican Council, during his short four-and-a-half-year pontificate, and St. John Paul, the second longest-serving hope in history (27 years), who is recognized as one of the most influential Church and world leaders of his time,” according to the Mass program.

Following the Mass was a reception, held in Pope John’s athletic center, which featured a historical presentation by Msgr. Raymond Kupke, diocesan archivist and pastor of St. Anthony Parish, Hawthorne. Before the Mass, visitors walked through the high school’s front entrance, decorated with banners that declared, “St. John XXIII” and bore his very fatherly image.

Despite his groundbreaking legacy, the Italian-born St. John was surprised to be elected leader for the Catholic Church at the age of 76 after 11 ballots. He surpassed popular expectations that he would serve as a “caretaking pope” by calling for the ecumenical council of Vatican II, which lasted from 1962 to 1965. From this historic council — attended by Paterson Bishop James McNulty and later Bishop James Navagh — “came changes that reshaped the face of Catholicism, including a stronger emphasis on ecumenism and a revised liturgy,” according to the Mass program.

“He had the confidence to throw open the windows of the Church and let the fresh air of the Spirit blow through, and he remained a passionate advocate for human rights, especially the unborn and the elderly and equality,” the Mass program states.

After Mass, Theresa Solazzo — who attended with her husband, Tony, and two daughters, including Dena, a Pope John senior — noted that she learned a bit more about the schools namesake. She said she was happy to learn that “he was down to Earth and loved the unborn and the elderly.” The Solazzos’ son, Nicholas was graduated from Pope John in 2011.

Helping out during the reception was Wade Trainor, a senior, who said that he learned in his studies at the high school that “St. John was both humble and bold.”

“Some Cardinals thought that St. John was arrogant to call Vatican II, but he did it because he felt that it was his duty,” said Trainor, who noted some of the significant changes in the liturgy brought on by Vatican II, including the celebration of Mass in the vernacular. “It has done the Church lot of good.”

Bishop Serratelli appropriately celebrated the momentous Mass in honor of the two newest saints at Pope John, which originally opened in 1956 under another name: Our Lady of the Lake Regional High School. Bishop Navagh, who later died in Rome at Vatican II, announced the name change after graduation in 1964, Msgr. McHugh said.

After the Mass, Msgr. McHugh told The Beacon that St. John’s “absolute simplicity” inspires him in his own priesthood. For St. John’s beatification in Rome in 2000, a few members of the school community, including students, traveled to Italy. During one stop, they visited his birthplace in Sotto Il Monte, a small two-story farmhouse that accommodated 14 children and extended relatives.

“St. John was so humble. More than anything, that experience touched me deeply,” said Msgr. McHugh, who amplified Pope John’s great joy in hosting the historic Mass for both new saints. “It was such a privilege to celebrate this momentous occasion in the history of St. John and St. John Paul — courageous men who had a profound impact on the Catholic Church in the 20th Century.”

Read the full article at http://www.evergreeneditions.com/article/Bishop+Marks+Canonization+Of+Church%E2%80%99s+Newest+Saints+At+April+27+Mass+At+Pope+John+XXII+H.S./1699869/207583/article.html.

Faithful Recall Fond Memories Of St. John Paul II

Cecile San Agustin

CLIFTON — As the universal Church celebrated the canonization of Pope John Paul II on Divine Mercy Sunday, many from around the diocese recalled fond memories of meeting and seeing the beloved pope.

He came to the Paterson Diocese in 1976 when he was Cardinal Karol Wojtyla, archbishop of Krakow. The saint visited Holy Rosary Church in Passaic, which was designated by Bishop Serratelli as the site of the diocesan shrine to John Paul II in 2012.

The shrine is located in an area where all people can come to pray to the Church’s newest saint. For the Polish community of Holy Rosary, it is an especially meaningful shrine. Many Polish faithful were moved by the historic event of John Paul II’s canonization including Father Zbigniew Tyburski, pastor of Ss. Cyril and Methodius Parish in Boonton, who traveled to Rome to witness the canonization.

“It was very important for me to be there because Pope John Paul II has made a tremendous impact on my life,” said Father Tyburski. “I met the pope twice and I remember those moments.”

Father Tyburski, also wanted to be present, especially since he is a professor at Seton Hall University’s Immaculate Conception Seminary School of Theology. He teaches Social Teachings of John Paul II to seminarians.

“The pope is one of the greatest examples of a priest. His teachings continue to shape the Catholic Church and its engagement with the modern world. St. John Paul II had an ethical approach to human life, culture, social justice and world peace,” he said.

Another Polish priest, Father Przemyslaw Nowak, parochial vicar of Assumption Parish in Morristown, said that St. John Paul II has been a role model for him. “His papacy and life influenced my life. He lost his family members young and he always embraced the cross. He had a love for the Blessed Mother and a commitment to Christ,” said Father Nowak, who was ordained last year as a priest.

He believes having St. John Paul II and St. John XXIII, who was also canonized, now as saints is a blessing for the Catholic Church. “They will both intercede for the whole world just as when they were living, they led the Catholic Church and the world for the times we were living,” he said.

During his papacy, St. John Paul II connected with people from all over the world making pilgrimages to countries to all corners of the globe. For Father Hernan Arias, pastor of St. Margaret Parish in Morristown, it was September 2004 when his unforgettable encounter of meeting St. John Paul II occurred in the Vatican, where he accompanied Bishop Serratelli and Bishop Emeritus Rodimer during an Ad Limina visit. “I remember the anticipation as I walked through the Apostolic Palace on my way to meet him. It was an incredible and wonderful feeling,” he said.

Remembering the moment, he posted a photograph of him with the pontiff on Facebook and captioned it, “A day I will never forget — meeting a saint.”

Even 10 years before the pope was named a saint, Father Arias already knew he was standing in front of holiness. He said, “I could sense the wisdom and kindness in his eyes. I am amazed I met a real saint. I learned so much from him. He taught the world to love God and to love the Church.”

St. John Paul’s love for the Church was for all people especially the young, whom he cared about and loved. He always told youths, “Do not be afraid.” He created World Youth Day, an event in which he called all young people to gather together in a major city, every two to three years.

The diocese first participated in 1993, when the pope came to Denver. Phil Russo coordinated the diocesan contingent to the Den ver pilgrimage and many more World Youth Days after that. “From that first World Youth Day encounter, St. John Paul has brought a renewed faith and empowerment to the young people of our diocese,” said Russo. “In 2000, when the diocese traveled to Rome he called the young people to be saints for the new millennium. He has truly enlivened so many of them — many who are now adults — to evangelize the faith.”

Lori DiGaetano, youth minister at St. Anthony Parish in Passaic, said she first saw St. John Paul II during an Easter visit to Rome as a junior in high school. She later brought teens to St. John Paul II through World Youth Day in Denver 1993, Paris 1997, Rome 2000 and Toronto 2002.

“From the first time I saw JP2 on television during his first visit to the United States,” she said. “I was captivated by his gentle smile and loving eyes. I remember being glued to the T.V. for days. I was truly blessed to have been in his presence many times and I know my life was forever changed because of those encounters. What a gift from God he was and still is.”

Father Patrick Rice, pastor of St. Kateri Tekakwitha Parish in Sparta, also saw St. John Paul II from several World Youth Day encounters and said, “St. John Paul II certainly deserves the title of patron saint of young people. He recognized the gifts they are to the Church. He believed in the power and the capacity that young people have to change hearts and ultimately society.”

Continuing the tradition of St. John Paul II, both Pope Emeritus Benedict XVI and Pope Francis have led World Youth Days with the next one to be held in St. John Paul II’s hometown of Krakow in 2016.

Father Rice hopes to bring more young people there and said, “It is a big moment to have someone named a saint and for many, because St. John Paul II made so many travels all around the world, people can say they met or at least saw a saint in person. That is truly a gift from God.”

Read the full article at http://www.evergreeneditions.com/article/Faithful+Recall+Fond+Memories+Of+St.+John+Paul+II/1699876/207583/article.html.

Next Page


Publication List
Using a screen reader? Click Here