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The Beacon The Beacon May 14 2014 : Page 1

Outreach, training programs listed for center Bishop celebrates Mass, administers Confirmation 4 N EWSPAPER OF THE D IOCESE OF P ATERSON , N. J. N O . 17 V OL . 48 > M AY 15, 2014 > 12 S ACRAMENT OF H OLY O RDERS Bishop Serratelli to ordain six men to the priesthood CLIFTON — Bishop Serratelli will ordain six men, who are transitional deacons, to the priesthood for the Paterson Diocese during the Rite of Ordination to the Priesthood, which will take place during the Rite of the Mass at 10:30 a.m., Saturday, May 24 in St. Philip the Apostle Church here. The bishop will ordain the following men: Rev. Mr. Christopher S. Barkhausen of Succasunna; Rev. Mr. Gabriel Barrera of Mexico; Rev. Mr. Wilder Alexander Londono Mazo and Rev. Mr. Yojaneider Garcia Ramirez, both of Colombia; and Rev. Mr. Mariusz Gajewski and Rev. Mr. Kamil Piotr Wierzbicki, both of Poland. Well-wishers — family, friends, priests and religious of the diocese, members of the parishes where the seminarians have served See Sacrament of Holy Orders on Page 2 HISTORIC MOMENT — Father Thomas Rainforth (right), chaplain at St. Joseph Regional Medical Center, Paterson, shares a smile with other pilgrims, including a friend Rick Yaeger (center), who traveled to Rome for the April 27 canonization of Popes John XXIII and John Paul II, as they all pose with large likeness of the two beloved popes. Many faithful from the Paterson Diocese descended on Rome to join the 1 million pilgrims from around the world for this historic event in Church history. C ANONIZATION M EMORIES Diocesan faithful bask in excitement of being in Rome as Popes John XXIII and John Paul II are made saints By MICHAEL WOJCIK News Editor CLIFTON — It’s been more than two weeks, but the many Catholics from the Paterson Diocese, who descended on Rome on April 27 to join more than 1 million pilgrims from around the world for the canonization of both St. John XXIII and St. John Paul II by Pope Francis, continue to revel in the ex-citement of having gotten a front-row seat to witness — or for some, to participate di-rectly — in this historic moment in Church history. The crushing crowds and deafening cheers have vanished from St. Peter’s Square DO NOT DELAY — TIME SENSITIVE NEWS MASS ON TV — Pilgrims watch Pope Francis preside at the canonization Mass for Popes John XXIII and John Paul II on large TV screens outside the square at the Vatican on April 27. since the historic canonization of these two pioneering popes — St. John and St. John Paul — on that cold and rainy Sunday morn-ing. Yet the powerful examples of their some-times bold and sometimes quiet lives, faith and pontificates certainly will continue to in-spire the lives and ministries of these Catholic pilgrims from the diocese. Local faithful who attended — priests, religious and laity and clergy and seminarians studying in Rome — included Father James Platania, a student at the Pontifical North American College there, who also received the opportunity to help distribute Holy Communion during the can-onization Mass. “The almost untouchable greatness of these two popes became tangible in the faces of the faithful, who had been inspired by their lives and were called to come to Rome to thank God for them,” said Father Platania, who attended and participated in the can-onization, along with a few friends. “I, in my turn, was thankful for the Church’s two new saints, but also for all of those pilgrims in St. Peter’s Square, called to be saints, whose faith that morning radiated the same Holy Spirit that guided St. John Paul and St. John in their saintly lives.” Father Platania described the energy and excitement of the pilgrims’ days before the canonizations, as “faithful from Italy, Poland, See Excitement on Page 8 A breath of holiness and newness reborn in the Spirit By FATHER ZBIGNIEW TYBURSKI [Editor’s Note: Father Tyburski, pas-tor of Ss. Cyril & Methodius Parish in Boonton, traveled to Rome for the canonizations of Pope John Paul II and Pope John XXIII. Following is his reflection on the canonizations.] T WO days before canonization, there was already something special to be felt in the atmos-phere of the Eternal City. Huge posters of both candidates who were to be led to the altars were placed on the walls of buses, trains, trams, stores, and on the polls in public places where they could be noticed by nearby walkers and passengers. The inhabitants of Rome all seemed to be speaking to each other excitedly, “Holy Papa, Holy Papa ...!” African Archbishop Zacheus Okoth, who arrived for the canonization, met me at Rome’s airport and shared his See Reborn on Page 9 H EALTH & W ELLNESS Y OUTH V IEWPOINT W HAT T O D O O BITUARIES C LASSIFIEDS 6 7 10-11 12 13 14-15

Sacrament Of Holy Orders

Bishop Serratelli to ordain six men to the priesthood

CLIFTON — Bishop Serratelli will ordain six men, who are transitional deacons, to the priesthood for the Paterson Diocese during the Rite of Ordination to the Priesthood, which will take place during the Rite of the Mass at 10:30 a.m., Saturday, May 24 in St. Philip the Apostle Church here.

The bishop will ordain the following men: Rev. Mr. Christopher S. Barkhausen of Succasunna; Rev. Mr. Gabriel Barrera of Mexico; Rev. Mr. Wilder Alexander Londono Mazo and Rev. Mr. Yojaneider Garcia Ramirez, both of Colombia; and Rev. Mr. Mariusz Gajewski and Rev. Mr. Kamil Piotr Wierzbicki, both of Poland.

Well-wishers — family, friends, priests and religious of the diocese, members of the parishes where the seminarians have served and other supporters — are invited to attend the ordination as a sign of encouragement to the new priests.

Rev. Mr. Christopher S. Barkhausen

Son of Stephen G. Barkhausen and Marta Berdel Barkhausen.

Born April 23, 1988 in Morristown.

Parish: St. Therese, Succa sunna.

Education: Completed studies at St. Therese School, Succasunna, in 2002, and at Pope John XXIII Regional High School, Sparta, in 2006; earned bachelor’s degree in Catholic theology from St. Andrew’s College Seminary at Seton Hall University, South Orange, in 2010; earned a Masters of Divinity from St. Vincent Seminary, Latrobe, Penn., in 2014.

Apostolic experiences: Served pastoral assignments in following parishes: St. Jude, Budd Lake; Blessed Sacrament and Our Lady of Lourdes, both Paterson; St. Michael, Netcong; and Assumption, Morristown. Served diaconate assignment in seminary at St. Maurice Parish, Forrest Hills, Pittsburgh, Pa.

Other accomplishments: Served as president of the Student Resident Forum at St. Vincent Seminary, (2012-13). Is Third Degree Knight of Columbus, Council 6320. Earned Eagle Scout, Boy Scout Troop 54, Succasunna, in 2005. Served on Boy Scout Training Crew 55, Junior Leadership Training Conference/National Youth Leadership Training, from 2004-08.

Rev. Mr. Gabriel Barrera

Son of Julián Barrera and Sara Ortuño.

Born Feb. 27, 1981, Caracuaro, Michoacán México.

Parish: San Agustín.

Education: Earned a bachelor’s degree in philosophy from Ave Maria Univer sity, Fla., in 2008; earned a master’s degree in theology from Franciscan Univer sity, Steuben ville, Ohio, in 2013; earned a Masters of Divinity from Ss. Cyril & Methodius Seminary, Orchard Lake, Mich.

Pastoral experience: Served pastoral assignments at following parishes: Our Lady Queen of Peace, Hewitt; St. Cecilia and Sacred Heart, both Rockaway; St. Brendan, Clifton.

Rev. Mr. Mariusz Gajewski

Son of Maria and Ryszard Gajewski of Krakow, Poland.

Born May 30, 1977 in Krakow.

Parish: Jesus the Good Shepherd, Krakow.

Education: Completed high school studies in Poland in 1996; earned a master’s degree in theology from the Gregorian Pontifical University, Rome; earned a master’s degree in pedagogy of religion and catechesis and social pedagogy and care from the Jesuit University, Krakow; earned a master’s degree in philosophy from the Jesuit University; earned a doctorate in philosophy from Jagiellonian University, Krakow.

Professional experience: Served as professor at Jagiellonian University and visiting professor of the Pontifical University of John Paul II, Krakow. Authored more than 40 articles and more than 10 books, including “Controversial Cult Groups and Sects: Psychological and Legal Approaches,” “Satanism: History, Controversies, Questions,” and his latest, “Finding God in All Things,” which explains key elements of Ignatian spirituality. Active in Charismatic Renewal for more than 20 years on local, national and international levels. Has given spiritual direction and retreats more than 10 years.

Rev. Mr. Wilder Alexander Londono Mazo

Son of Gerardo Antonio Londono Mazo and Ofelia de Jesus Mazo.

Born Sept. 12, 1980 in Medellin, Colombia.

Parish: St. Martin de Porres, Medellin.

Education: Studied philosophy and theology at Seminary Major Misional San Pius X, Istmina-Tadó Diocese, Colombia, and theology at Universidad Fray Luis Amigó, Medellin. Now studying English and English as a Second Language at Rutgers University, Newark.

Pastoral experiences: Served as an Acolyte; in youth and catechetical, baptismal and first Communion ministries; and later as director for pastoral, youth, and religious education ministries at St. Martin of Porres. Served Our Lady of Mount Carmel Parish, Boonton, while living at Bartimaeus House of Discernment, also Boonton. Now serving and living at St. Vincent Martyr Parish, Madison.

Special comments: “With my parents’ full support and prayers, I began to contemplate the idea to be a Catholic priest, when I was 14-years-old. My parents helped me to make this decision with their sacrifices and prayers. I saw in them the joy of serving Jesus in his Church and I knew that I wanted to be a priest,” Rev. Mr. Mazo said.

Rev. Mr. Yojaneider Garcia Ramirez

Son of Pascual de Jesus Garcia Gomez and Martha Lucia Ramirez Zuluaga.

Born Jan. 28, 1987 in Marinilla, Antioquia, Colombia.

Parish: Sacred Heart of Jesus Marinilla, Antioquia.

Education: Earned a certification in electronics and electricity from “Simona Duque” Industrial Technical High School, Colombia; studied philosophy at the Great Seminary of “La Milagrosa” and theology at the Great Seminary of “Villa Paul” in the Congregation of the Mission of the Vincentian Fathers, both Colombia; earned an associate’s degree in accounting from CENTECA; earned a degree in Sacred Theology from the Pontifical Bolivarian University, Medellin, Colombia; earned an associate’s degree in pastoral leadership for communities and people affected by violence from the Pontifical Xavierian University, Bogota, Colombia; studied business management at the National University of Colombia; now studying English as a Second Language at Rutgers University, Newark.

Pastoral experience: Coordinated the pastoral social at “La Milagrosa.” Served as seminary teacher, secretary and treasurer of the Internal Seminary Congregation of the Vincentian Fathers Mission. Coor dinated the liturgy group of the “Apostolica” Vincentian Fathers. Worked for four years for the formation of laymen at “Villa Paul” and in the Missionary School for Laymen Project of the Pontifical Xavierian University. Served as assistant treasurer and coordinator of family ministry at “Villa Paul.” Taught religion in the Nogales School of Funza, Cundinamarca, Colombia. Served at Holy Family Parish, Flor ham Park. Has served as a deacon at St. Jude Parish, Budd Lake, since last September.

Rev. Mr. Kamil Piotr Wierzbicki

Son of Grzegorz and Barbara Wierzbicki of Sosnowiec, Poland.

Born Jan. 18, 1985 in Sosnowiec.

Parish: St. Joseph.

Education: Completed studies at Tadeusz Rozdzi enski High School, Sosnowiec, Poland in 2004; studied at the Pontifical Theo logical Academy, Krakow, Poland, from 2004-06; earned a bachelor’s degree from St. Mary’s Seminary and University, Baltimore, in 2011; earned a bachelor’s degree in Sacred Theology from St. Mary’s in 2013; earned a master’s degree in theology from St. Mary’s in 2013.f

Read the full article at http://www.evergreeneditions.com/article/Sacrament+Of+Holy+Orders/1711991/209751/article.html.

Diocesan Faithful Bask In Excitement Of Being In Rome As Popes John XXIII And John Paul II Are Made Saints

Michael Wojcik

CLIFTON — It’s been more than two weeks, but the many Catholics from the Paterson Diocese, who descended on Rome on April 27 to join more than 1 million pilgrims from around the world for the canonization of both St. John XXIII and St. John Paul II by Pope Francis, continue to revel in the excitement of having gotten a front-row seat to witness — or for some, to participate directly — in this historic moment in Church history.

The crushing crowds and deafening cheers have vanished from St. Peter’s Square since the historic canonization of these two pioneering popes — St. John and St. John Paul — on that cold and rainy Sunday morning. Yet the powerful examples of their sometimes bold and sometimes quiet lives, faith and pontificates certainly will continue to inspire the lives and ministries of these Catholic pilgrims from the diocese. Local faithful who attended — priests, religious and laity and clergy and seminarians studying in Rome — included Father James Platania, a student at the Pontifical North American College there, who also received the opportunity to help distribute Holy Communion during the canonization Mass.

“The almost untouchable greatness of these two popes became tangible in the faces of the faithful, who had been inspired by their lives and were called to come to Rome to thank God for them,” said Father Platania, who attended and participated in the canonization, along with a few friends. “I, in my turn, was thankful for the Church’s two new saints, but also for all of those pilgrims in St. Peter’s Square, called to be saints, whose faith that morning radiated the same Holy Spirit that guided St. John Paul and St. John in their saintly lives.”

Father Platania described the energy and excitement of the pilgrims’ days before the canonizations, as “faithful from Italy, Poland, and all over the world descended upon the Eternal City in great numbers, temporarily swelling its population by millions.”

“Pilgrim groups, distinguished by their colored bandanas tied around their necks and backpacks, visited the holy sites of the city,” Father Platania said. “The spirit really increased the evening before, where Rome’s famous churches and public squares hosted prayer vigils and festive celebrations. That evening, many would make their way from these prayer vigils to descend upon the area around St. Peter’s Basilica, where they would spend the night on the streets and pray in hope that God would find for them a place within St. Peter’s Square for the canonizations the next morning,” he said.

The canonization reminded another pilgrim — Kathleen Ragan, who traveled with a group from her parish, Our Lady of the Holy Angels (OLHA), Little Falls — about a visit that Cardinal Karol Wojtyla — later St. John Paul — made to her alma mater, Immaculate Conception High School, Lodi, when she was a teen-ager. Also, Ragan went to Giants Stadium in 1995 for Mass with Pope John Paul II, during his visit to the Newark Archdiocese.

“The canonization gave me a chance to be part of history — to be there — which was pretty cool,” said Ragan, who is of Polish heritage, like St. John Paul, and who watched the Mass with her group on a large TV off St. Peter’s Square.

One diocesan seminarian, Stephen Prisk, took witnessing the canonization to heart by expressing “gratitude for the gift of studying in Rome.”

“I walk the same halls every day that both St. John and St. John Paul walked when they visited the North American College. All the more I can easily go to the tombs of these saints, who are buried in St. Peter’s Basilica, and ask for their intercession,” said Prisk, who completed thirdyear theology there.

The crowds that attended the canonization gave seminarian Lemmuel Camacho an opportunity to reflect on “the mystery of the Church as a communion of believers in the Lord.”

“The people who were present at the canonization proved that the Church is alive. When the people of God joyfully proclaim the love of Christ, then we become witnesses of the message of the Gospel,” said Camacho, who completed third-year theology at the Pontifical North American College.

Still basking in the excitement, Father Thomas Rainforth, chaplain at St. Joseph Regional Medical Center, Paterson, went with a friend to the canonization, which gave him the opportunity to reflect on the legacy of St. John, who was elected pope, when the priest was a child.

“St. John opened up the Church. He called for the Second Vatican Council. He also was different than stately Pope Pius XII, who served before him,” said Father Rainforth, who also, helped distribute Holy Communion at a Mass with St. John Paul in 1979 in Yankee Stadium, met him during a general audience in Rome in 1988 and saw him again during his 1995 Giants Stadium Mass.

In his homily at the canonization, Pope Francis described the different gifts that St. John and St. John Paul brought to the Church. He called St. John “the pope of openness to the Holy Spirit” and St. John Paul as “the pope of the family,” a title which John Paul II himself wished to be remembered by, said seminarian Cesar Jaramillo, who completed first-year theology at the Pontifical North American College.

“The lives of these two holy men, their countless efforts to proclaim the Good News of the Gospel and their desire to share the love of God with the rest of the world are a source of inspiration for all of us, especially for me as I continue my formation towards the priesthood,” said Jaramillo, who like several pilgrims, shared photos of his experience on the social networking website, FaceBook. “There was an inexplicable atmosphere of joy in the Eternal City that weekend. Sunday morning was very cloudy and once Mass started it began to drizzle but the clouds had no effect whatsoever on the crowd. However, everything changed when Pope Francis pronounced the official formula in Latin that made Popes John and John Paul saints. The rain stopped and people joined the joy of the universal Church by clapping. It was incredible!” he said.

Local pilgrims also included Fathers Edward Rama and Ricardo Ortega, both parochial vicars at OLHA, who traveled with the group from their parish. Like many priests there, they enjoyed celebrating Mass in some of the grand churches in and around Rome, such as the Basilica of St. Mary Major.

“They are such beautiful churches,” Father Rama said. “We didn’t get to close [for the canonization] but it was a thrill for us to be with more than 1 million other pilgrims on the world stage. It was a unique experience,” he said.

Other local pilgrims who went to Rome for the canonization included Msgr. Joseph Ciampaglio, a retired diocesan priest; Father Zbigniew Tyburksi, pastor of Ss. Cyril & Methodius Parish, in Boonton, who wrote a reflection on his time in Rome for the canonizations (see page 1); and Father Stefan Las, pastor of Holy Rosary Parish, Passaic, home to the diocesan shrine to St. John Paul.

The trip to Rome also served as many pilgrims’ first experience seeing Pope Francis up close and personal. Days after the canonization, Father Rainforth attended an audience with the pontiff in St. Peter’s Square. He witnessed the pope come down into the audience to see, talk with, bless and embrace a group of disabled people in wheelchairs.

“Pope Francis was humble. He was not rushed and took his time with each person,” Father Rainforth said. “He is an example of Christ on Earth.”

Several groups of pilgrims took the opportunity during this pilgrimage to visit other spiritual and historical sites in and around Italy or in other counties. Father Rainforth traveled to Bologna, the birthplace of St. Catherine of Bologna; and also to Venice; and Florence, while the OLHA group traveled to Assisi and also to the shrine at Fatima, Portugal.

Camacho said he was delighted to attend the canonization, in part, because it celebrated two men, who “were not afraid to proclaim the truth.” In his homily, Pope Francis emphasized they “were not afraid to touch the wounds of Christ. In doing so, they were able to touch the poor and the marginalized,” the seminarian recalled.

“We are also called to do the same. We are called to touch the lives of people through our works of love. By doing so, we would be creating a legacy to tell the next generation not to be afraid in ‘opening the doors of our lives to Christ,’ ” Camacho said.

Read the full article at http://www.evergreeneditions.com/article/Diocesan+Faithful+Bask+In+Excitement+Of+Being+In+Rome+As+Popes+John+XXIII+And+John+Paul+II+Are+Made+Saints/1712013/209751/article.html.

A Breath Of Holiness And Newness Reborn In The Spirit

Father Zbigniew Tyburski

[Editor’s Note: Father Tyburski, pastor of Ss. Cyril & Methodius Parish in Boonton, traveled to Rome for the canonizations of Pope John Paul II and Pope John XXIII. Following is his reflection on the canonizations.]

TWO days before canonization, there was already something special to be felt in the atmosphere of the Eternal City. Huge posters of both candidates who were to be led to the altars were placed on the walls of buses, trains, trams, stores, and on the polls in public places where they could be noticed by nearby walkers and passengers. The inhabitants of Rome all seemed to be speaking to each other excitedly, “Holy Papa, Holy Papa ...!”

African Archbishop Zacheus Okoth, who arrived for the canonization, met me at Rome’s airport and shared his joy due to his consecration by Pope John Paul II to be the Archbishop of the Archdiocese of Kisumu in Kenya. When he learned that I was Polish, his praise of the extraordinary personality and holiness of John Paul seemed to have no end. Sharing with me his business card, he invited me to visit his archdiocese some day.

Several person teams from Spain sang religious songs in Rome’s tramcars and “infected” all of the new passengers who entered at each station with their enthusiasm. Despite the squeezing of the crowd at rush hours, passengers enjoyed the young people’s enthusiasm and were inspired to reflect on their lots by the songs’ messages. One of the songs, which was sung at the altar in both Spanish and English, informed the audience of a sheep that was lost that now is found and is embraced within the arms of the heavenly Shepherd.

At the vigil of canonization, and at night, the situation at St. Peter’s Square was similar in joyfulness to that of the tram, according the witnesses’ relations, but on much larger scale. The guitar’s sound and the loud melodious voices of youths were heard in all the corners of St. Peter’s Square. The chilly night did not bother them; they warmed themselves up with song, dance, and gestures of joyfulness.

The peak of the new birth in the Spirit was visible in the multitude gathering on the day of canonization. Waiting for many hours to hear announcements with the names of new saints was connected to many inconveniences: lack of a good view at the big screens of what was going on (in my case there was no chance to be on the central place near the altar), lack of fresh air to breathe, and the constant pushing of newcomers who forced themselves further toward the front to be closer to such an important event. Despite these types of obstacles, a kind of mysterious prayerful unity hung in the air like a breath of holiness that we all breathed.

Among the hundreds of thousands of people who were visible on the day of canonization there were the largest number of Polish flags and banners, and among them probably the largest number were from Krakow. What the Polish believers thought of having their beloved Karol Wojtyla accepted into sainthood, only God knows. Mayor of Krakow, Jacek Majchrowski, who was present three years ago on the John Paul II’s beatification, wrote the following words: “Many years since he traveled the world doing good, illuminating hearts and inspiring hope, John Paul II again comes in touch with the faithful, who can rebuild their attachment to the Holy Father and submit themselves to spiritual guidance, protection and loving care.” (“John Paul II, Family Album,” p. 22).

Seeing the crowd united and absorbed in prayer, I understood that this was the fruit of the Holy Spirit. My thoughts went further and led me to conviction that a fundamental condition for the successful New Evangelization, to which St. John Paul II called us, is this kind of rebirth in the Spirit. St. John the Evangelist explained that truth in the third chapter of his Gospel. Jesus instructed Nicodemus, who was in search of God, that he must be reborn in the Spirit (See: J 3:3-6). This kind of rebirth in the Spirit allows the baptized believers to grow deeper roots for God’s Words during Sunday’s preaching, as well as for “discovering” other human beings for who they truly are, which was most significant in the life of St. John Paul II. In our modern materialistic world, some people are manipulated by negative aspects of culture and evaluate human beings based only on the external opinions of others, and their works only in terms of materialistic success.

St. John Paul II calls us, as Jesus called St. Frances of Assissi, to rebuild the Church according the values of God’s Spirit in man’s life. He encourages us to meditate on his words written in his encyclical about the Holy Spirit, Dominum et Vivificantem, in chapter 58, the pope seems to assure us that he is our mediator before God: “United with the Spirit, the Church is supremely aware of the reality of the inner man, of what is deepest and most essential in man, because it is spiritual and incorruptible. At this level the Spirit grafts the “root of immortality” from which the new life springs. This is man’s life in God, which, as a fruit of God’s salvific self- communication in the Holy Spirit, can develop and flourish only by the Spirit’s action. Therefore St. Paul speaks to God on behalf of believers, to whom he declares ‘I bow my knees before the Father..., that he may grant you...to be strengthened with might through his Spirit in the inner man.’”

Read the full article at http://www.evergreeneditions.com/article/A+Breath+Of+Holiness+And+Newness+Reborn+In+The+Spirit/1712024/209751/article.html.

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