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The Beacon The Beacon June 26 2014 : Page 1

Bishop installs pastor at Budd Lake parish Outreach, training programs listed for center 4 N EWSPAPER OF THE D IOCESE OF P ATERSON , N. J. N O . 23 V OL . 48 > J UNE 26, 2014 > 6 Vivere Christus Awards given to 114 in diocese Annual ceremony honors individuals, couples, families for service to others By CECILE SAN AGUSTIN Reporter CLIFTON — For being the imitation of Christ here on Earth in serving others, 114 indi-viduals, couples and families were honored with the diocesan Vivere Christus Award, which was presented to them by Bishop Serratelli June 22 on the Feast of Corpus Christi in St. Philip the Apostle Church here. The Vivere Christus Est Medal (from the Latin phrase, “To live is Christ,” Phil 1:21), was awarded to the recipients for their on-going contributions to the Church and those in their parish communities and beyond in furthering the mission of Christ and his Church through their generous actions. The ceremony, in both English and Spanish, drew a crowd that filled St. Philip Church to stand-ing room only as nominating pastors, fami-ly and friends came to support those who received the award. “Vivere Christus Est” is also the episco-pal motto of Bishop Serratelli. In 2009, he instituted the award to acknowledge the val-ue and importance of the laity and to ex-press gratitude and appreciation to those who unselfishly give of themselves for the building up of God’s Kingdom. In his opening remarks, Bishop Serratelli said, “I welcome all of you this afternoon and in a special way, I welcome my broth-er priests as we honor those who have con-tributed so much to the Church of Paterson — our Vivere Christus Award recipients.” As in past award ceremonies, the Gospel reading during the service was from Matthew, which proclaims we should all be “the salt of the earth” and “light of the world.” During the ceremony, Father Joseph Garbarino, pastor of St. Philip’s, and Father Edgar Ruiz, pastor of St. Mary and St. Nicholas parishes in Passaic, delivered the homilies, in English and Spanish respectively. In his homily, Father Garbarino said, “As we gather in this place today, we recognize our common call to be Christ for one an-other; to be salt and to be light and to think, to see and to act in the name of Jesus Christ. Each one of us is given the same task. As we honor our recipients today, we thank God for the gift of you. We thank God for being brothers and sisters with each one of you in ministry throughout the various parishes of the diocese.” Father Ruiz, spoke in Spanish about the Vivere Christus honorees’ commitment to their communities and imitating Christ on Earth. “They are faithful servants to God and inspire us to help others.” Sister of Christian Charity Mary Edward Spohrer, diocesan chancellor and delegate for religious, called forward each recipient to receive the medal from Bishop Serratelli. Honorees received a brass medal, three inch-es in diameter, embossed with the diocesan crest on the obverse and a portrait of St. John’s Cathedral in Paterson and the words in Latin, “Vivere Christus Est” on the reverse. See Vivere Christus on Page 2 PAPAL GREETING — Pope Francis greets a young mother and her child who were among the thousands of pilgrims in St. Peter’s Square during a recent Wednesday general audience with the pope. At St. Paul Inside the Walls, the diocesan Evangelization Center in Madison, laity are taking part in “Reasons to Believe: a Year with Pope Francis,” to converse about and to explore the pope’s life, teachings and public statements. CNA photo / Daniel Ibáñez F OCUS ON F RANCIS By MICHAEL WOJCIK News Editor MADISON — Faith is personal, but not pri-vate. Pope Francis urges Catholics every-where to make their faith in Jesus Christ public by stepping out into the world and sharing with great joy the “salvation, free-dom and love” they have experienced through Jesus with their neighbors — from around the block to around the globe. That’s one of the countless lessons and insights about the new pontiff that the laity from around the Paterson Diocese and be-yond learned during lively roundtable dis-cussions, “Reasons to Believe: a Year with Pope Francis.” SOLT Father Derek Anderson, diocesan di-rector of catechesis and the newly-appoint-ed pastor of St. Mary Parish, Dover, lead these engaging conversations about Pope Francis’ life, teachings and public statements about various contemporary topics in the library of St. Paul Inside the Walls: the Diocesan Evangelization Center at Bayley-Ellard here. “Evangelization is about communicating the salvation, freedom and love that we have experienced through Christ, in a way that others can understand,” said Father Anderson ‘Reasons to Believe’ series at St. Paul Inside the Walls explores pope’s teachings DO NOT DELAY — TIME SENSITIVE NEWS during the last of these Saturday-morning They are very pleased about what they are sessions, held on June 21, which examined hearing from the pope. He is compassion-parts of Pope Francis’ apostolic exhortation, ate and both down to Earth and theologi-“Evangelii Gaudium,” or in English, “The Joy cal at the same time and has made quite an of the Gospel.” “This [joy that originates impact so far,” said Father Anderson, who from faith] transforms how added that he will ask the we view our neighbors. In a roundtable participants if certain sense, we owe our they want to continue the Pope Francis neighbors the opportunity to series in the fall. “We gath-makes it easier to ered at St. Paul’s to discuss get to know Christ and ex-perience the joy of the be a Catholic. He is what they were hearing, Gospel,” he said. and to learn how to apply Father Anderson led dy-for those who have the theology and spirituali-namic discussions that some-ty spoken of by Pope Francis less. Even non-times turned into debates. our everyday lives,” he Catholics admire to They examined faith through said. a global lens — from the state him, which motivates These monthly discus-of Catholicism in the world sions have found participants and inspires me. today to the intent of many examining Pope Francis’ of Pope Francis’ teachings — comments about contempo-C INDY B URKE , to the personal — how par-rary issues, such as homo-R ESURRECTION P ARISH , ticipants experience the joys sexuality; the interview he R ANDOLPH and challenges of sharing the gave to America magazine; faith in their own lives. With some of his grand gestures, great insight and occasional humor, the priest such as opening up a dialogue with non-be-attempted to bring the conversations back to lievers; and reactions to him from around a Catholic context. the world, Father Anderson said. “They get interested in talking about Pope During the last session, participants spoke See Focus on Page 4 Francis and a lot of contemporary topics. “ ” THE BEACON’S ANNUAL SALUTE TO 8TH GRADE, HIGH SCHOOL GRADUATES W HAT T O D O V IEWPOINT S ENIOR L IFESTYLES 9-21 O BITUARIES C LASSIFIEDS 6 7 8 22-23 23

Vivere Christus Awards Given To 114 In Diocese

Cecile San Agustin

Annual ceremony honors individuals, couples, families for service to others

CLIFTON — For being the imitation of Christ here on Earth in serving others, 114 individuals, couples and families were honored with the diocesan Vivere Christus Award, which was presented to them by Bishop Serratelli June 22 on the Feast of Corpus Christi in St. Philip the Apostle Church here.

The Vivere Christus Est Medal (from the Latin phrase, “To live is Christ,” Phil 1:21), was awarded to the recipients for their ongoing contributions to the Church and those in their parish communities and beyond in furthering the mission of Christ and his Church through their generous actions. The ceremony, in both English and Spanish, drew a crowd that filled St. Philip Church to standing room only as nominating pastors, family and friends came to support those who received the award.

“Vivere Christus Est” is also the episcopal motto of Bishop Serratelli. In 2009, he instituted the award to acknowledge the value and importance of the laity and to express gratitude and appreciation to those who unselfishly give of themselves for the building up of God’s Kingdom.

In his opening remarks, Bishop Serratelli said, “I welcome all of you this afternoon and in a special way, I welcome my brother priests as we honor those who have contributed so much to the Church of Paterson — our Vivere Christus Award recipients.”

As in past award ceremonies, the Gospel reading during the service was from Matthew, which proclaims we should all be “the salt of the earth” and “light of the world.”

During the ceremony, Father Joseph Garbarino, pastor of St. Philip’s, and Father Edgar Ruiz, pastor of St. Mary and St. Nicholas parishes in Passaic, delivered the homilies, in English and Spanish respectively.

In his homily, Father Garbarino said, “As we gather in this place today, we recognize our common call to be Christ for one another; to be salt and to be light and to think, to see and to act in the name of Jesus Christ. Each one of us is given the same task. As we honor our recipients today, we thank God for the gift of you. We thank God for being brothers and sisters with each one of you in ministry throughout the various parishes of the diocese.”

Father Ruiz, spoke in Spanish about the Vivere Christus honorees’ commitment to their communities and imitating Christ on Earth. “They are faithful servants to God and inspire us to help others.”

Sister of Christian Charity Mary Edward Spohrer, diocesan chancellor and delegate for religious, called forward each recipient to receive the medal from Bishop Serratelli. Honorees received a brass medal, three inches in diameter, embossed with the diocesan crest on the obverse and a portrait of St. John’s Cathedral in Paterson and the words in Latin, “Vivere Christus Est” on the reverse. The medal was enclosed in a cherrywood box, accompanied by a personal scroll of recognition in English and Spanish.

At the end of the ceremony, Father ST Sutton, parochial vicar of Our Lady of the Valley, who is part of the Vivere Christus Award committee, thanked all those in attendance for honoring those who serve the Church of Paterson. Other committee members include: Sister Mary Edward Spohrer; Father Richard Bay, pastor of St. Simon Parish, Green Pond; Father Jared Brogan, parochial vicar at St. Philip’s; Father Kevin Corcoran, the bishop’s priest/secretary, and Father Patrick Ryan, pastor of St. James of the Marches Parish, Totowa.

Following the service, a reception was held for the honorees and their guests in the gymnasium of St. Philip’s School. There, family and friends gathered to congratulate loved ones for the honor they had received form the bishop.

Throughout the diocese, honorees were noted in their individual parishes’ bulletins detailing the service they do to make a difference. A sampling follows.

At St. Mary Parish in Pompton Lakes, Thomas Lowe was the honoree. Lowe is active in the leading the coat drive every year and coordinating the parish’s efforts at a Jersey City soup kitchen. He also served as a food pantry volunteer. Franciscan Father Frank Sevola, pastor, said, “I am very grateful to Tom and his wife, Georgina, for all the great work they do for St. Mary’s and for the Church.”

The parish community of Christ the King Parish in New Vernon chose to honor Mary Bentzlin. She devotes much of her time and efforts to training the parish’s youth lectors. For many years, she organized and produced Christ the King’s annual Christmas pageant. In addition to serving as a lector, she is a choir member, part of the Bible study group, the Book-of-the Month club and the Regina Mundi Guild. She also serves on the parish council and is a member of many local organizations.

Notre Dame of Mount Carmel Parish in Cedar Knolls chose Marilyn and Owen Hudson as recipients of the 2014 Vivere Christus award. “It is abundantly clear to all who know them that, for a whole host of reasons, the Hudsons exemplify what Bishop Serratelli had in mind when he instituted this prestigious award,” said their pastor, Benedictine Father Jude Salus. “Marilyn and Owen have been parishioners since 2000, and have been a driving force in so many areas of parish life. For several years, they oversaw and shepherded our RCIA program, helping to bring new souls into the Catholic faith. They also developed and led our ‘Catholics Returning Home’ ministry, which has become an important way back to the Church for disconnected Catholics. For many years, they expertly guided the training and development of our lectors. Last, but importantly, the have been active members of Men’s and Women’s Cornerstone ministries, and our Lenten ‘Follow Me’ faith sharing program,” he said.

St. Lawrence Parish in Chester honored Mickey and Loretta Stewart, parishioners for almost 50 years. Father Nicholas Bozza, pastor, said, “Much of the service of Mick and Loretta is done within their family, for their children and grandchildren. In addition, they give service as Eucharistic ministers, on the environment committee, the Rosary Society, with the ESL program and in many other parish activities. I can say whenever we have a parish event, be it morning prayer, morning Mass, the morning coffee group, Bible study, parish penance services, parish missions, you can count on Mick and Loretta being there.”

In his closing remarks, Bishop Serratelli said, “When we come together for a great celebration like this, we realize that the Church is alive and it is growing. Each of us have a role and Christ is using us to build up the kingdom of God today.”

Read the full article at http://www.evergreeneditions.com/article/Vivere+Christus+Awards+Given+To+114+In+Diocese/1744716/215025/article.html.

Focus On Francis

Michael Wojcik

‘Reasons to Believe’ series at St. Paul Inside the Walls explores pope’s teachings

MADISON — Faith is personal, but not private. Pope Francis urges Catholics everywhere to make their faith in Jesus Christ public by stepping out into the world and sharing with great joy the “salvation, freedom and love” they have experienced through Jesus with their neighbors — from around the block to around the globe.

That’s one of the countless lessons and insights about the new pontiff that the laity from around the Paterson Diocese and beyond learned during lively roundtable discussions, “Reasons to Believe: a Year with Pope Francis.”

SOLT Father Derek Anderson, diocesan director of catechesis and the newly-appointed pastor of St. Mary Parish, Dover, lead these engaging conversations about Pope Francis’ life, teachings and public statements about various contemporary topics in the library of St. Paul Inside the Walls: the Diocesan Evangelization Center at Bayley-Ellard here.

“Evangelization is about communicating the salvation, freedom and love that we have experienced through Christ, in a way that others can understand,” said Father Anderson during the last of these Saturday-morning sessions, held on June 21, which examined parts of Pope Francis’ apostolic exhortation, “Evangelii Gaudium,” or in English, “The Joy of the Gospel.” “This [joy that originates from faith] transforms how we view our neighbors. In a certain sense, we owe our neighbors the opportunity to get to know Christ and experience the joy of the Gospel,” he said.

Father Anderson led dynamic discussions that sometimes turned into debates. They examined faith through a global lens — from the state of Catholicism in the world today to the intent of many of Pope Francis’ teachings — to the personal — how participants experience the joys and challenges of sharing the faith in their own lives. With great insight and occasional humor, the priest attempted to bring the conversations back to a Catholic context.

“They get interested in talking about Pope Francis and a lot of contemporary topics. They are very pleased about what they are hearing from the pope. He is compassionate and both down to Earth and theological at the same time and has made quite an impact so far,” said Father Anderson, who added that he will ask the roundtable participants if they want to continue the series in the fall. “We gathered at St. Paul’s to discuss what they were hearing, and to learn how to apply the theology and spirituality spoken of by Pope Francis to our everyday lives,” he said.

These monthly discussions have found participants examining Pope Francis’ comments about contemporary issues, such as homosexuality; the interview he gave to America magazine; some of his grand gestures, such as opening up a dialogue with non-believers; and reactions to him from around the world, Father Anderson said.

During the last session, participants spoke about the challenges of talking about their faith openly in professional or social situations, which tends to hold back many Catholics from evangelizing. Father Anderson suggested that they look for little “evangelizing moments,” such as a golden opportunity during the day to draw someone a little closer to Jesus, maybe by simply telling someone in need that you will pray for him or her.

During the last session, Father Anderson led participants through Pope Francis’ teachings on the social justice dimension of preaching the “Good News.” They agreed that, in “The Joy of the Gospel,” the pontiff speaks about eradicating poverty and the huge divine between rich and poor; preserving the dignity of the poor; and protecting the rights of workers. Yet, some of them disagreed whether he was writing from the economic perspective of a socialist.

“Pope Francis does not condemn capitalism per se, but he does criticize an ‘unbridled capitalism’, or any economic system or political philosophy for that matter, which drives the poor and marginalized further from a humane and dignified existence and makes their plight even more burdensome. This is challenging for us in the United States, and requires serious reflection and a willingness to seek a conversion of heart, which can be personally intimidating. Pope Francis often speaks directly about dignified work, education, healthcare, and several other basic human rights such as life in general,” Father Anderson said. “As Catholics we work to make the Kingdom of God more present in our world. As a result, the Gospel needs to reach every strata of humanity, including economic structures that exasperate the problem of poverty.”

Throughout his exhortation, Pope Francis has stated in different ways that topical solutions are not enough. The pope challenges us to take on a new mindset, to take on the mind of Christ himself, and to acquire a heart for solidarity, which, in his own words, entails ‘more than a few sporadic acts of generosity,’” he said.

Participants also talked about becoming peacemakers in society plagued by violence.

“Peace starts with me through my inner peace with Christ,” said MaryTheresa Conca, St. Paul’s head of hospitality.

We Catholics need to become “instruments of peace in our families” and in other situations in our lives, Father Anderson said.

“Individual conversion is needed for us to fulfill the social dimension of the Gospel. We can be transformed, but not through our efforts alone. Transformation entails turning to God anew, on a daily basis,” Father Anderson said. “People think that to be a missionary in our families, at school, or in our work place is futile because we can’t effect change. But one person can make a difference. We must believe that everything is possible for God, and no one is out of His reach,” he said.

Impressed with Father Anderson’s gifts as a facilitator of the discussions, Cindy Burke of Resurrection Parish, Randolph, said that she leaves “a little lighter and filled with more purpose in faith.”

“Pope Francis makes it easier to be a Catholic. He is for those who have less. Even non-Catholics admire him, which motivates and inspires me,” Burke said.

Read the full article at http://www.evergreeneditions.com/article/Focus+On+Francis/1744721/215025/article.html.

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