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The Beacon July 17, 2014 : Page 1

Outreach, training programs listed for center Sister Agnes Miriam Crucis makes perpetual vows 6 N EWSPAPER OF THE D IOCESE OF P ATERSON , N. J. N O . 26 V OL . 48 > J ULY 17, 2014 > 5 ‘A S PIRITUAL R OAD T RIP T HROUGH THE D IOCESE ’ Shrine of St. Thérèse in Boonton represents gratitude of founder By MICHAEL WOJCIK News Editor New Pastor installed at Hopatcong Church DO NOT DELAY — TIME SENSITIVE NEWS said Catherine Arci, a parishioner of Our Lady of Mount Carmel (OLMC), in Boon ton, who main-[E DITOR ’ S N OTE : This story is the first tains the shrine on behalf of the in a series that will feature many of Arci family. Walk through the black wood-the devotional sites that local faith-ful can visit on their travels through-en doors of the shrine, encircled out the diocese in Passaic, Morris by ring of brown bricks, and enter a small, peaceful room aglow with and Sussex counties this summer.] candles — including devotional BOONTON — Take a short drive up ones you can light for an intention a wooded street to an out-of-for 50 cents. Adorning the space are pictures of Jesus the-way dead end and St. Thérèse; and at the top of a hill statues of various in Boonton. Then, sizes. Next to the al-step out and walk tar stands a tall stat-through the doors of ue of St. Thérèse, a small stone struc-greeting you, smil-ture that resembles ing down and hold-a country church — ing a crucifix and in reality an ornate bouquet of roses. shrine that takes you You can sit and pray a world away from HOLY IMAGE — A life’s worries and in-stained-glass window of in one of the many to the peace only St. Therese of Lisieux at rows of folding chairs with kneelers Christ can give. the shrine in Boonton before the altar. On Welcome inside built in her honor. a clear day, sunlight of the 81-year-old Shrine of St. Thérèse of the Little light pours through the colored Flower, which also gives visitors stained-glass windows that line not only a glimpse into the life and both sidewalls of the shrine. See Shrine on Page 2 religious devotion of its patron, St. Thérèse of Lisieux, but also into the life of the local Italian man, Achille Arci, whose gratitude to her inspired him to build this de-votional place in her honor. Today, the shrine also represents the love and devotion to Arci by his fami-By MICHAEL WOJCIK ly, which continues to take care of News Editor the building and grounds in his honor. MADISON — A small but dynamic “The people who come by ap-group of pastors from the diocese preciate the shrine. It’s a peaceful has been gathering regularly at St. and serene place where, at least for Paul Inside the Walls here on a mis-a while, your troubles can go away,” sion: to discuss the many power-ful suggestions offered by a best-selling book about how to revital-ize their respective parishes, fill them anew with the Spirit and sharpen their focus in fulfilling the Church’s mission as Christ com-manded: “Go out and make disci-ples of all nations.” Since last October, up to seven pastors have been meeting at the diocesan evangelization center once every other month to engage in conversations about the blockbuster that has been stirring up U.S. Catholics since its publication last year: “Rebuilt: Awakening the Faithful, Reaching the Lost and Making Church Matter.” The book tells the story of the Church of the Nativity in Timonium, Md., which embarked on a total makeover that helped it come alive in the Spirit HAPPY DAY — Above: Father Vidal Gonzales Jr. receives greetings from Bishop Serratelli and concelebrating priests before his installation Mass July 13 as pastor of St. Jude Parish, Hopat cong. Right: After officially installing Father Gonzales as pastor, the bishop leads the congregation in applause for him. For more photos of the installation Mass, see page 7. Beacon photos / Joe Gigli ‘R EBUILT ’ Pastors meet at St. Paul Inside the Walls to discuss book on how to revitalize parishes St. Paul’s executive director and diocesan Vicar for Evangelization, who has been facilitating the dis-cussions and who noted that he en-joys lively discussions with his fel-low priests. “I’m impressed by the love of the priesthood and desire about the book. Recent graduates of the diocese’s Certificate in Catholic Evangelization program will follow up discussions in a group, called 72 Review, Father Manning said. “Rebuilt” tells the story of the Church of the Nativity, where the parish community had realized over several years just how much its well-intentioned ministries had lost their meaning and mission. For so long, the parish mistakenly thought it understood its purpose: to organize ministries and events that pleased its faithful — from bus trips to overnight “lock-downs” for young people. “We at Nativity were going to burn out or change. When we as a parish lost the “Why?’ of what we were doing, then we lost our way,” said Tom Corcoran, Nativity’s pastoral associate and co-author of “Rebuilt,” who told his parish’s in-spiring story at a presentation on Nov. 23 last year at St. Paul Inside the Walls — shortly after the pas-tors’ roundtable had started. See ‘Rebuilt’ on Page 12 again and refocus on its true mis-sion. The parish’s dramatic sever-al-year-old transformation today serves as a model for parishes. A few of the pastors have cred-ited “Rebuilt” for inspiring them to consider more deeply their parish-“ We … were going to burn out or change. When we as a parish lost the “Why?’ of what we were doing, then we lost our way. ” T OM C ORCORAN , ‘R EBUILT ’ CO -AUTHOR es becoming more welcoming; helping to make disciples, who go out and make disciples; and inten-sifying their efforts to reach out to the “unchurched.” Some pastors have encouraged members of their parish staffs and councils to read “Rebuilt.” “I think ‘Rebuilt’ raises a lot of issues [about parish ministry] that challenge us,” said Father Manning, to evangelize that these priests still have after decades in parish min-istry,” he said. The group plans to resume meetings in the fall to discuss the book “Tools for Rebuilding,” a se-quel that offers suggestions that are “more practical and concrete.” St. Paul’s also hosted a group of parish staffers from around the dio-cese, who met regularly to talk Y OUTH W HAT T O D O H EALTH & W ELLNESS V IEWPOINT C LASSIFIEDS O BITUARIES 4 5 5 8-9 10-11 12

‘A Spiritual Road Trip Through The Diocese’

Michael Wojcik

Shrine of St. Thérèse in Boonton represents gratitude of founder

[EDITOR’S NOTE: This story is the first in a series that will feature many of the devotional sites that local faithful can visit on their travels throughout the diocese in Passaic, Morris and Sussex counties this summer.]

BOONTON — Take a short drive up a wooded street to an out-ofthe- way dead end at the top of a hill in Boonton. Then, step out and walk through the doors of a small stone structure that resembles a country church — in reality an ornate shrine that takes you a world away from life’s worries and into the peace only Christ can give.

Welcome inside of the 81-year-old Shrine of St. Thérèse of the Little Flower, which also gives visitors not only a glimpse into the life and religious devotion of its patron, St. Thérèse of Lisieux, but also into the life of the local Italian man, Achille Arci, whose gratitude to her inspired him to build this devotional place in her honor. Today, the shrine also represents the love and devotion to Arci by his family, which continues to take care of the building and grounds in his honor.

“The people who come by appreciate the shrine. It’s a peaceful and serene place where, at least for a while, your troubles can go away, said Catherine Arci, a parishioner of Our Lady of Mount Carmel (OLMC), in Boon ton, who maintains the shrine on behalf of the Arci family.

Walk through the black wooden doors of the shrine, encircled by ring of brown bricks, and enter a small, peaceful room aglow with candles — including devotional ones you can light for an intention for 50 cents. Adorning the space are pictures of Jesus and St. Thérèse; and statues of various sizes. Next to the altar stands a tall statue of St. Thérèse, greeting you, smiling down and holding a crucifix and bouquet of roses. You can sit and pray in one of the many rows of folding chairs with kneelers before the altar. On a clear day, sunlight light pours through the colored stained-glass windows that line both sidewalls of the shrine.

A small sign on Rock Lane points you in the direction of the shrine up the hill at the end of the road in a residential area. Outside, you can see a large cross, outlined in stone on the ground to the right of the shrine, and several park benches that dot the scenic grounds, where visitors can pray and reflect. Arci opens the shrine seven days a week from 8 a.m. to 6 p. m. in the spring and 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. in the fall. It closes for the winter on Nov. 1 and reopens on May 1.

A photo of Achille Arci displayed on a wall next to the tall St. Thérèse statue reminds visitors about the promise that he made in 1920 — the promise that compelled him to build this shrine. Back then, he became ill and learned from doctors with no bedside manners that there was no cure. So he prayed to St. Thérèse — also known as the “Little Flower of Jesus” [see timeline below about her life] for help. He made two promises if cured — that he would construct a shrine in her honor and that he would make a pilgrimage to her home in Lisieux in France.

After a five-year fight, Achille Arci was miraculously cured. He kept his promises, first forming a small society of faithful Catholics — local Italian tradesmen and artisans — who asked for donations and contributed their time and talents to building the shrine. The group completed the project in three years, erecting it on what was the Arcis’ property at the time. In 1952, Achille Arci kept his second promise: traveling to Lisieux, according to the shrine’s history.

“My father had a great devotion to St. Therese even before he got sick. He thought that she was the greatest saint,” Arci said. “This shrine was my father’s. He loved this place until the day he died. Now, when I’m in trouble, I pray to her,” she said.

Achille Arci kept taking care of the shrine until he died in 1957. Eventually, ownership of the shrine was transferred to Our Lady of Mount Carmel Parish, Boonton. Today, the Arci family keeps caring for the shrine and grounds in memory of their father and out of their devotion to St. Thérèse — all with the help of generous donations from visitors, Arci said.

Many people visit the shrine during a typical day, but because not all of them sign the guestbook that greets them near the entrance, it is not possible for Arci to determine how many visitors come on a yearly basis. The guestbook does reveal that visitors come from all over — as close as Boonton, Denville, Totowa, Lake Hiawatha and Verona to as far at Florida and Switzerland. The shrine does have an altar but the shrine does not usually host Masses or weddings, Arci said.

One of the shrine’s frequent visitors, Louise Carter, has maintained a special devotion to St. Thérèse for most of her life.

Carter first visited the shrine at twoyears- old. Shortly after, she was stricken with polio, a crippling disease considered incurable at the time. One day, her mother pushed her in a wheelchair up the hill from Boonton to the shrine. There, visiting Sisters of the Immaculate Conception came with a relic of the saint and held it up to Carter’s feet. To weeks later, the little girl could walk again.

“I love St. Thérèse. When I have a problem, that’s where I go — to her,” Carter said. “I have always loved the shrine. It’s peaceful and it’s a beautiful place to pray,” she said.

Read the full article at http://www.evergreeneditions.com/article/%E2%80%98A+Spiritual+Road+Trip+Through+The+Diocese%E2%80%99/1761534/217696/article.html.

‘REBUILT’

Michael Wojcik

Pastors meet at St. Paul Inside the Walls to discuss book on how to revitalize parishes

MADISON — A small but dynamic group of pastors from the diocese has been gathering regularly at St. Paul Inside the Walls here on a mission: to discuss the many powerful suggestions offered by a bestselling book about how to revitalize their respective parishes, fill them anew with the Spirit and sharpen their focus in fulfilling the Church’s mission as Christ commanded: “Go out and make disciples of all nations.”

Since last October, up to seven pastors have been meeting at the diocesan evangelization center once every other month to engage in conversations about the blockbuster that has been stirring up U.S. Catholics since its publication last year: “Rebuilt: Awakening the Faithful, Reaching the Lost and Making Church Matter.” The book tells the story of the Church of the Nativity in Timonium, Md., which embarked on a total makeover that helped it come alive in the Spirit again and refocus on its true mission. The parish’s dramatic several- year-old transformation today serves as a model for parishes.

A few of the pastors have credited “Rebuilt” for inspiring them to consider more deeply their parishes becoming more welcoming; helping to make disciples, who go out and make disciples; and intensifying their efforts to reach out to the “unchurched.” Some pastors have encouraged members of their parish staffs and councils to read “Rebuilt.”

“I think ‘Rebuilt’ raises a lot of issues [about parish ministry] that challenge us,” said Father Manning, St. Paul’s executive director and diocesan Vicar for Evangelization, who has been facilitating the discussions and who noted that he enjoys lively discussions with his fellow priests. “I’m impressed by the love of the priesthood and desire to evangelize that these priests still have after decades in parish ministry,” he said.

The group plans to resume meetings in the fall to discuss the book “Tools for Rebuilding,” a sequel that offers suggestions that are “more practical and concrete.” St. Paul’s also hosted a group of parish staffers from around the diocese, who met regularly to talk about the book. Recent graduates of the diocese’s Certificate in Catholic Evangelization program will follow up discussions in a group, called 72 Review, Father Manning said.

“Rebuilt” tells the story of the Church of the Nativity, where the parish community had realized over several years just how much its well-intentioned ministries had lost their meaning and mission. For so long, the parish mistakenly thought it understood its purpose: to organize ministries and events that pleased its faithful — from bus trips to overnight “lock-downs” for young people.

“We at Nativity were going to burn out or change. When we as a parish lost the “Why?’ of what we were doing, then we lost our way,” said Tom Corcoran, Nativity’s pastoral associate and co-author of “Rebuilt,” who told his parish’s inspiring story at a presentation on Nov. 23 last year at St. Paul Inside the Walls — shortly after the pastors’ roundtable had started.

“Nativity tripled its weekend Mass attendance, greatly increased parishioner participation and financial support and increased [the parish’s] spirit and momentum,” he said.

During their discussions, participating pastors agreed with following principles, among others, in “Rebuilt”:

• Parishes should focus on reaching out to “lost” or “unchurched” people;

• Parishes need to “form disciples, who make disciples,” as Jesus commands and as is the Church’s primary mission; and

• Parishes should minister to all people within our boundaries, including those who do not agree with our faith.

Yet, participating pastors disagreed with the authors of “Rebuilt” — who also include Nativity’s pastor, Father Michael White — that parishes should focus on weekend activities. They noted that their parishes hold many weekday activities, including religious education, outreaches to seniors and the parish school, if applicable. Some priests also disagreed with the authors, who discourage parishes from allowing priests from outside the faith community to celebrate Mass on the weekends, Father Manning said.

One participant, Father Daniel Murphy, pastor of St. Matthew Parish, Randolph, said the that the book has inspired his parish to create a technology committee to help “develop the talents of young people” and “unify the parish’s communications.” The parish also revived its 25-year-old mission statement to include promoting youth, emphasizing evangelization and reflecting on secular society. Also, it has been looking at the idea of augmenting its ushers with family greeters to strengthen its already “strong sense of welcome,” Father Murphy said.

“I’m excited that ‘Rebuilt’ has given us some ways that we can make our parishes more vibrant,” Father Murphy said.

‘“Rebuilt” also inspired Our Lady of the Lake (OLL) Parish, Sparta, to consider installing large video screens and cameras in church that display the lyrics of hymns and close ups of the celebrants; re-examining his liturgical music choices; and stationing greeters at Mass, said OLL’s pastor, Father David McDonnell of (OLL) Parish, Sparta, another participant.

“Some things [at OLL] are working and some things can be improved upon,” said Father McDonnell, who added that he felt inspired by the book’s themes of welcome, worship and evangelization. “We want to be of service to people. We want to attract more people to worship. We also want churchgoers to become ministers, who ‘go forth.’ We want to reach people we don’t see on a regular basis,” the pastor said.

Another pastor, Msgr. George Hundt of St. Vincent Martyr Parish, Madison, said that “Rebuilt” has encouraged his parish to look into the areas of music ministry, welcoming, faith development and small faith-sharing groups.

“This is a good time for St. Vincent’s to receive ‘Rebuilt,’ ” said Msgr. Hundt, who noted that the parish recently completed the first round of its “Envision: Planning Our Parish Future” process and a successful capital campaign for the renovation of its church. “This is a time for building up the parish physically and the faith community so it can grow in Christ and in a sense of discipleship,” he said.

Read the full article at http://www.evergreeneditions.com/article/%E2%80%98REBUILT%E2%80%99/1761543/217696/article.html.

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