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The Beacon August 28, 2014 : Page 1

16 M ASS FOR SC HOOL A DMINI S TR A TOR S BEGIN S NEW SC HOOL YE A R 8/28/2014 SUSSEX PASSAIC THE A W A RDWINNING NEW S P A PER OF THE R. C . DIO C E S E OF P A TER S ON, N.J. MORRIS Bishop leads pilgrimage to France, Spain 13 3 8 BI S HOP BLE SS E S S T. CAS IMIR C RO SS NOW ON DPD’ S PROPERTY Pilgrims learn about the saints, ask for healing on journey to Lourdes By MICHAEL WOJCIK NE WS EDIT OR CEDAR KNOLLS When Carmela BI S HOP BLE SS E S NEW C H A PEL A T S W A RT S WOOD P A RI S H 7 10-1 1 13 14-15 Y OUTH V IEWPOINT W HAT T O D O C LASSIFIED Aquino of Notre Dame of Mount Carmel Parish here has a bad day, she remembers the joy she felt on a faith-affirming pilgrimage to France and Spain this summer with 24 other Catholics, led by Bishop Serratelli. This July 24–Aug. 2 spiritual journey brought these pilgrims closer to their faith and devotion to the saints from that region of Western Europe and God’s peace and healing at the world-renowned Our Lady of Lourdes Shrine in France. Bishop Serratelli served as spiritual director of the this pilgrimage, called “A Spiritual Journey to France and Spain” that was organized by Great Experiences Inc., Ramsey. These pil-grims — including two priests and seven lay people from the Paterson SANCTUARY At Lourdes, France, the Sanctuary of Our Lady of Lourdes, also known as the Domain, welcomes pilgrims, who visit the nearby grotto where the Blessed Mother appeared to St. Bernadette in 1858. Last month, 24 pilgrims, led by Bishop Serratelli, visited Lourdes and Barcelona, Spain. Diocese — toured impressive cathe-drals and basilicas in Toulouse and Lourdes, France, and Barcelona, Spain. Some of these religious sites are related to saints, such as St. Thomas Aquinas. They also went to Lourdes, the most visited pilgrimage site in the world, where they experi-enced the spiritual power of gathering together with thousands of people the world over to pray, asking for the Lord’s peace and healing. “The pilgrimage strengthened my faith a lot. There were so many beau-tiful places on the trip,” said Aquino, who traveled with husband, Vincenzo. “Bishop Serratelli is such a wonderful man. He told us stories [about the sites they visited] and was available to answer our questions,” she said. Having led pilgrimages to many devotional sites over the years, Bishop Serratelli called this latest pilgrimage “a truly spiritual experience.” He ex-plained to pilgrims the history and spirituality of these sites. The sojourn-ers from the dioceses originated from Morristown, Cedar Knolls, Whippany, Parsippany, Paterson and Hawthorne. Others came from much farther away, such as a priest from Lansing, Mich. “The pilgrimage was prayerful and enjoyable,” said Bishop Serratelli of the journey, which also included vis-iting secular cultural and historical sites and relaxing. “The three days in Lourdes set the proper tone for us. We combined learning about some saints in France, such as St. Thomas Aquinas, with learning about several other saints in Barcelona,” the bishop said. Bishop Serratelli led the pilgrims on a journey to Toulouse, France PILGRIMAGE on 2 DO NOT DELAY — TIME SENSITIVE NEWS SPIRITUAL ROAD TRIP THROUGH THE DIOCESE Labyrinth at Wayne parish helps people connect with God [ EDITOR’ S NOTE: This story is the sixth in a series featuring many of the shrines, prayer gardens, rosary walks and other devotional sites that local faithful can visit on their travels throughout the diocese this summer. ] By MICHAEL WOJCIK NE WS EDIT OR WAYNE Emotions sometimes can run high, even in the peace and quiet of the labyrinth at Our Lady of Consolation Parish (OLC) here. Occasionally, parishioners and vis-itors to OLC cry as they pray or med-itate, walking the meandering, yet pur-poseful stone path of this peaceful — and striking — labyrinth, which sits on a grassy plain next to the rectory. That’s because they make connections between their slow journey from the outside to the center of the circuitous pattern of this devotional space and their own journey in life — filled with lots of hope and disappointment — all the while walking with God. “Praying and walking the labyrinth can be overwhelming,” said Sister of the Church Arlene Kollar, OLC’s pas-toral associate for outreach, standing on intricate pattern of the red and charcoal grey paving stones of the labyrinth, near a stand of tall trees. “Sometimes, while walking the labyrinth, you feel further away from the center, like in life — when you feel further away from your goals or from the Lord. You wonder where He is in your life. But if you continue to the center, you will find your inner self and God. The path becomes a metaphor for our journey through life, as it awakens us to the deep rhythm that unites us to ourselves and the in-ner Spirit within,” she said. That powerful journey actually starts at one corner of the parking lot next to the rectory, where a concrete sidewalk greets visitors and brings them to a stone walk that leads them to the labyrinth. People can pray, med-itate or reflect, as they walk the nine circuits — or revolutions — around the 32-foot wide circle. In the center, they can stand or kneel in prayer, Sister Arlene said. Eventually, the journey takes visi-tors to each of the labyrinth’s four sections, called quadrants, enabling them to cover the entire area of the devotional space. Then, they retrace their steps from the center and back out to the edge, again symbolizing life itself — returning to the routine of the everyday, after having been in-volved in an exhilarating spiritual ex-perience, Sister Arlene said. A few metal benches sit at the edge of the labyrinth, located in a se-cluded spot that soaks up the natural ROAD TRIP on 4

Bishop Leads Pilgrimage To France, Spain

Michael Wojcik

Pilgrims learn about the saints, ask for healing on journey to Lourdes

CEDAR KNOLLS When Carmela Aquino of Notre Dame of Mount Carmel Parish here has a bad day, she remembers the joy she felt on a faithaffirming pilgrimage to France and Spain this summer with 24 other Catholics, led by Bishop Serratelli. This July 24–Aug. 2 spiritual journey brought these pilgrims closer to their faith and devotion to the saints from that region of Western Europe and God’s peace and healing at the worldrenowned Our Lady of Lourdes Shrine in France.

Bishop Serratelli served as spiritual director of the this pilgrimage, called “A Spiritual Journey to France and Spain” that was organized by Great Experiences Inc., Ramsey. These pilgrims — including two priests and seven lay people from the Paterson Diocese — toured impressive cathedrals and basilicas in Toulouse and Lourdes, France, and Barcelona, Spain. Some of these religious sites are related to saints, such as St. Thomas Aquinas. They also went to Lourdes, the most visited pilgrimage site in the world, where they experienced the spiritual power of gathering together with thousands of people the world over to pray, asking for the Lord’s peace and healing.

“The pilgrimage strengthened my faith a lot. There were so many beautiful places on the trip,” said Aquino, who traveled with husband, Vincenzo. “Bishop Serratelli is such a wonderful man. He told us stories [about the sites they visited] and was available to answer our questions,” she said.

Having led pilgrimages to many devotional sites over the years, Bishop Serratelli called this latest pilgrimage “a truly spiritual experience.” He explained to pilgrims the history and spirituality of these sites. The sojourners from the dioceses originated from Morristown, Cedar Knolls, Whippany, Parsippany, Paterson and Hawthorne. Others came from much farther away, such as a priest from Lansing, Mich.

“The pilgrimage was prayerful and enjoyable,” said Bishop Serratelli of the journey, which also included visiting secular cultural and historical sites and relaxing. “The three days in Lourdes set the proper tone for us. We combined learning about some saints in France, such as St. Thomas Aquinas, with learning about several other saints in Barcelona,” the bishop said.

Bishop Serratelli led the pilgrims on a journey to Toulouse, France home to the Jacobins Church, a Romanesque structure that houses the relics of St. Thomas Aquinas and a shrine dedicated to him at its center. Later, the group toured the Basilica of St. Sernin, an 11th century Romanesque structure, where the bodies of St. Sernin and St. Honoratus are buried.

Then, the pilgrims visited Lourdes. Many felt God’s peace and healing, taking part in the evening candlelight procession with thousands of faithful; praying before the “grotto,” where 14-year-old Bernadette Soubiroux witnessed apparitions of the Blessed Mother in 1858; stepping into the healing waters of the famed “baths” within the shrine’s large complex of buildings; and praying the Stations of the Cross. There, Bishop Serratelli celebrated Masses at the Chapel of St. Gabriel, the Chapel of St. Anne and the crypt of the Basilica of Our Lady of Lourdes.

“For me, Lourdes was the best part of the trip. It’s a place of holiness and peace. You can see the faith and spirituality of the people,” said Rich Taylor of Guardian Angel Parish, Allendale, and member of the board of directors of Eva’s Village, a non-profit, Catholic-affiliated social-service organization in Paterson. “My wife, Aleta, and I were inspired by the gratitude and the humility of the [ill] people being helped and those who were helping [them at many of the shrine’s sites]. I was amazed to see thousands of wheelchairs there,” he said.

These pilgrims also traveled to nearby Bartres, a small village. There, St. Bernadette attended St. Jean Batiste Church, which contains one of her relics. They also visited a sheepfold, where she tended sheep.

Later, the pilgrims moved on to Barcelona, a cosmopolitan Spanish city and home to many cultural attractions and works of art by Pablo Picasso, Antoni Gaudi and Salvador Dali.
Bishop Serratelli celebrated morning Mass in La Sagrada Familia, a minor basilica, which Gaudi designed and the group toured. Then, they went to Montserrat to visit Santa Maria de Montserrat Monastery, a Benedictine abbey that is notable for enshrining the image of the Virgin of Monteserrat.

On the group’s last full day of touring, Bishop Serratelli celebrated Mass in the Cathedral of Barcelona, a Gothic structure built between the 13th and 15th centuries that houses the bodies of St. Eulalia, St. Olegarius and St. Raymond of Penyafort.

Many of the faithful, such as Taylor, came to enjoy the companionship and spiritual leadership of Bishop Serratelli on the pilgrimage. Owner of an electrical and mechanical contracting business in Paterson, Taylor said he got to know the bishop before his first pilgrimage with him to the Holy Land last year.

“Bishop Serratelli knows his history. He is a brilliant theologian. He also has a great sense of humor and is fun to be around,” Taylor said. “The bishop is a humble servant of God, who is dedicated to infusing the faith in anyone he meets. He is tremendous shepherd of the Church. His life is built on God and Christ,” he said.home to the Jacobins Church, a Romanesque structure that houses the relics of St. Thomas Aquinas and a shrine dedicated to him at its center. Later, the group toured the Basilica of St. Sernin, an 11th century Romanesque structure, where the bodies of St. Sernin and St. Honoratus are buried.

Then, the pilgrims visited Lourdes. Many felt God’s peace and healing, taking part in the evening candlelight procession with thousands of faithful; praying before the “grotto,” where 14-year-old Bernadette Soubiroux witnessed apparitions of the Blessed Mother in 1858; stepping into the healing waters of the famed “baths” within the shrine’s large complex of buildings; and praying the Stations of the Cross. There, Bishop Serratelli celebrated Masses at the Chapel of St. Gabriel, the Chapel of St. Anne and the crypt of the Basilica of Our Lady of Lourdes.

“For me, Lourdes was the best part of the trip. It’s a place of holiness and peace. You can see the faith and spirituality of the people,” said Rich Taylor of Guardian Angel Parish, Allendale, and member of the board of directors of Eva’s Village, a non-profit, Catholic-affiliated social-service organization in Paterson. “My wife, Aleta, and I were inspired by the gratitude and the humility of the [ill] people being helped and those who were helping [them at many of the shrine’s sites]. I was amazed to see thousands of wheelchairs there,” he said.

These pilgrims also traveled to nearby Bartres, a small village. There, St. Bernadette attended St. Jean Batiste Church, which contains one of her relics. They also visited a sheepfold, where she tended sheep.

Later, the pilgrims moved on to Barcelona, a cosmopolitan Spanish city and home to many cultural attractions and works of art by Pablo Picasso, Antoni Gaudi and Salvador Dali. Bishop Serratelli celebrated morning Mass in La Sagrada Familia, a minor basilica, which Gaudi designed and the group toured. Then, they went to Montserrat to visit Santa Maria de Montserrat Monastery, a Benedictine abbey that is notable for enshrining the image of the Virgin of Monteserrat.

On the group’s last full day of touring, Bishop Serratelli celebrated Mass in the Cathedral of Barcelona, a Gothic structure built between the 13th and 15th centuries that houses the bodies of St. Eulalia, St. Olegarius and St. Raymond of Penyafort.

Many of the faithful, such as Taylor, came to enjoy the companionship and spiritual leadership of Bishop Serratelli on the pilgrimage. Owner of an electrical and mechanical contracting business in Paterson, Taylor said he got to know the bishop before his first pilgrimage with him to the Holy Land last year.

“Bishop Serratelli knows his history. He is a brilliant theologian. He also has a great sense of humor and is fun to be around,” Taylor said. “The bishop is a humble servant of God, who is dedicated to infusing the faith in anyone he meets. He is tremendous shepherd of the Church. His life is built on God and Christ,” he said.

Read the full article at http://www.evergreeneditions.com/article/Bishop+Leads+Pilgrimage+To+France%2C+Spain/1796744/223007/article.html.

Labyrinth At Wayne Parish Helps People Connect With God

Michael Wojcik

[EDITOR’S NOTE: This story is the sixth in a series featuring many of the shrines, prayer gardens, rosary walks and other devotional sites that local faithful can visit on their travels throughout the diocese this summer.]

WAYNE Emotions sometimes can run high, even in the peace and quiet of the labyrinth at Our Lady of Consolation Parish (OLC) here.

Occasionally, parishioners and visitors to OLC cry as they pray or meditate, walking the meandering, yet purposeful stone path of this peaceful — and striking — labyrinth, which sits on a grassy plain next to the rectory. That’s because they make connections between their slow journey from the outside to the center of the circuitous pattern of this devotional space and their own journey in life — filled with lots of hope and disappointment — all the while walking with God.

“Praying and walking the labyrinth can be overwhelming,” said Sister of the Church Arlene Kollar, OLC’s pastoral associate for outreach, standing on intricate pattern of the red and charcoal grey paving stones of the labyrinth, near a stand of tall trees. “Sometimes, while walking the labyrinth, you feel further away from the center, like in life — when you feel further away from your goals or from the Lord. You wonder where He is in your life. But if you continue to the center, you will find your inner self and God. The path becomes a metaphor for our journey through life, as it awakens us to the deep rhythm that unites us to ourselves and the inner Spirit within,” she said.

That powerful journey actually starts at one corner of the parking lot next to the rectory, where a concrete sidewalk greets visitors and brings them to a stone walk that leads them to the labyrinth. People can pray, meditate or reflect, as they walk the nine circuits — or revolutions — around the 32-foot wide circle. In the center, they can stand or kneel in prayer, Sister Arlene said.

Eventually, the journey takes visitors to each of the labyrinth’s four sections, called quadrants, enabling them to cover the entire area of the devotional space. Then, they retrace their steps from the center and back out to the edge, again symbolizing life itself — returning to the routine of the everyday, after having been involved in an exhilarating spiritual experience, Sister Arlene said.

A few metal benches sit at the edge of the labyrinth, located in a secluded spot that soaks up the natural beauty of the wooded parish property for visitors to sit to pray, read or relax, said Sister Arlene, who conceived of and developed the labyrinth project, which was completed in 2010.

“The labyrinth — based on an ancient form of spirituality — is a haven for silence and reflection,” said Sister Arlene, who noted that up to 20 people can walk and pray the devotional space at once. “Again, the labyrinth is like life. Maybe you will meet someone on the path and you can walk together,” she said.

Already, the labyrinth has attracted OLC parishioners, who visit in the morning; religious education students; women, making their Cornerstone Retreat; and even young people from Our Lady of Lourdes Parish, Paterson, who came to the parish for a retreat, Sister Arlene said.

“I think the labyrinth is a great addition to our entire area. It is a really peaceful and contemplative place,” said Father Michael Lombardo, OLC pastor, who added that the parish has been undertaking work to improve the walkway system throughout the campus, so it will “knit together” these devotional spaces. “I couldn’t be happier. The labyrinth is a great asset to the parish and I compliment Sister Arlene on her diligence in getting it to happen. It’s a win-win all the way around,” he said.

“The labyrinth was a moving experience,” said Karen Casiello, who walked a temporary labyrinth, when it was laid down on the floor of the auditorium of the former parish school during a recent Cornerstone retreat, and looks forward to visiting the outdoor devotional space. “As I walked, my thoughts quieted down. Even though I didn’t communicate with anyone else [walking the labyrinth], people would give me a smile or a hug. I realized that it was a metaphor for life. Some - times, I feel closer to or further from Jesus, but he always at the center that never moves,” she said.

Walking and praying OLC’s labyrinth takes Sister Arlene back to her visits to two labyrinths that gave her the inspiration to take on this project: one at the cathedral in Chartres, France, another at Grace Episcopal Cathe - dral in San Francisco. An anonymous donor funded the materials for the labyrinth. With the approval of Father Michael Lombardo, OLC pastor, main tenance personnel installed it from a kit by the Connecticut-based Laby rinth Company, which included the pattern and pre-cut stones, Sister Arlene said.

The labyrinth joined other devotional spaces on OLC’s campus. It overlooks a large white cross that stands at the edge of the parish’s picnic grounds. The labyrinth also leads to a wooded path, flanked by images of Stations of the Cross, that brings visitors to the church. A walk back to the parking lot reveals a statue of the Blessed Mother holding the Baby Jesus, the result of an Eagle Scout project.

The wooded path of the Stations of the Cross also leads visitors to the parish’s refurbished Prayer and Memorial Garden, located at the side of the church and dedicated to Msgr. Carl Wolsin, the founding pastor. It contains another statue of Mary and the Christ Child and monuments. The most striking is a twisted piece of steel from the World Trade Center, alongside a shorter black granite monument, that together were dedicated to those who died in the Sept. 11, 2001 terrorists’ attacks.

Standing in the center of the labyrinth one recent afternoon, Sister Arlene talked about further plans: sprucing up the labyrinth; an official dedication of it this fall; and the installation of lighting, so visitors can walk at night, and a mailbox next to the rectory that contains instructions about how to pray, using the labyrinth. She invited people from parishes far and near to come visit, Sister Arlene said.

“When I walk and pray the labyrinth, I let God speak to me. That can be challenging and cause a great deal of emotion, because God can be pushing us to get out of our comfort zones and go out and embrace life,” Sister Arlene said. “It could be about letting go and letting God walk with us on our journey through life.”

Read the full article at http://www.evergreeneditions.com/article/Labyrinth+At+Wayne+Parish+Helps+People+Connect+With+God/1796747/223007/article.html.

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