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The Beacon The Beacon September 11 2014 : Page 1

7 FILIPINO CATHOLICS TO HONOR MARTYR SAINTS AT MASS SUSSEX PASSAIC THE AWARDWINNING NEWSPAPER OF THE R.C. DIOCESE OF PATERSON, N.J. MORRIS 9/11/2014 S TEP -B Y -S TEP U PDATING AN A GING I NFRASTRUCTURE Partners in Faith gifts help Catholic Charities improve its facilities By CECILE SAN AGUSTIN REPOR TER 8 9 SS. CYRIL & METHODIUS PARISH IN BOONTON WELCOMES BISHOP 17 BISHOP MAKES PASTORAL VISIT TO OLMC PARISH IN PASSAIC 8 10-1 1 13 14-15 18-19 W HAT T O D O Y OUTH O BITUARIES V IEWPOINT C LASSIFIEDS BEACON PHOTO | JOE GIGLI Bishop Serratelli blesses the front steps of St. Joseph Church in Newton Sept. 6 as the color guard of Don Bosco Knights of Columbus Council 7784 stands at attention. The steps are part of the parish’s new front step plaza project, which also included a new entrance space leading to the entrance to the church. For story and more photos, see page 16. PATERSON Urgent work to aging facilities has begun at diocesan Catholic Charities facilities. At Catholic Family and Community Services (CFCS) upgrades have started, made possible by a $100,000 allocation from Partners in Faith (PIF), the recent capital and endow-ment campaign of the Paterson Diocese. The priority facility im-provements are currently being done at CFCS’ main office here, Hope House in Dover, Mount St. Joseph Children’s Center in Totowa, Friendship Corner One here and Father English Center here. These needs include replacing boilers, repairing roofs and basements caused by water damage, in-stalling security systems, removing asbestos and PIF on 3 SPIRITUAL ROAD TRIP THROUGH THE DIOCESE DO NOT DELAY — TIME SENSITIVE NEWS Statue of Mary now visible to all in prayer garden at Little Falls parish By MICHAEL WOJCIK NE WS EDIT OR [ EDITOR’S NOTE: This is the seventh in a series featuring many of the shrines, prayer gardens, rosary walks and other devotional sites at parishes across the diocese. ] LITTLE FALLS Once again, a tall, white statue of the Blessed Mother has found a rightful place in the sun outside Our Lady of the Holy Angels Church here. Earlier this year, reloca-tion of the striking devotional object brought it from behind a thicket of overgrown bushes and into an open to a space on the side of the church, where visitors can pray. Yet the pastor of this Passaic County faith commu-nity thinks that the marble statue of Mary shines brightest at night in the glow of a new spotlight. Today, that statue stands in Holy Angels’ new prayer gar-den dedicated to the Blessed Virgin, located on the side of the church between one of the front stairs and a two-story elevator tower. Several green shrubs and a row of yellow flowers surround the statue and invite people to pray and reflect be-fore the sacred image. Fittingly, Msgr. T. Mark Condon, Holy Angels’ pastor, dedicated this new sacred space on Aug. 22, the Feast of the Queenship of Mary. “People have taken to the prayer garden. They come before and after Mass to pray. They come all through-out the course of the day. It’s a beautiful and peaceful place and is a sign of encouragement to people,” Msgr. Condon said. “Also, the statue of Mary reminds us that the Blessed Virgin Mary is always our Mother and intercessor. It looks even more impressive at night with the new light on her,” he said. For years, that statue was hidden in plain sight. Originally located on a landing between the two main staircases in front of Holy Angels Church, it got so completely covered by shrubbery that many parishioners passed by it with-out even knowing it was there. Earlier this year, the shrubs were removed from around the statue and it was re-located to a small patch of land be-tween the church and a driveway that leads from Route 23 to the parking lot at the rear of the church. This statue of Mary originally came from afar — the former St. Joseph Seminary of the Holy Name Province of the Order of the Friars Minor in Calicoon, N.Y., when it closed in the 1990s — thanks to Franciscan Father Thomas Gallagher, one of Holy Angels’ former pastors. The Franciscans had served the parish for 125 years, since its founding, be-fore they turned its administration PRAYER GARDEN on 2

Updating An Aging Infrastructure

Cecile San Agustin

Partners in Faith gifts help Catholic Charities improve its facilities

PATERSON

Urgent work to aging facilities has begun at diocesan Catholic Charities facilities. At Catholic Family and Community Services (CFCS) upgrades have started, made possible by a $100,000 allocation from Partners in Faith (PIF), the recent capital and endowment campaign of the Paterson Diocese.

The priority facility improvements are currently being done at CFCS’ main office here, Hope House in Dover, Mount St. Joseph Children’s Center in Totowa, Friendship Corner One here and Father English Center here. These needs include replacing boilers, repairing roofs and basements caused by water damage, installing security systems, removing asbestos and replacing handicapped ramps. For the next three years as pledges are met, CFCS will continue to make needed repairs and renovate the aging buildings.

“All of these buildings are more than 100 years old,” said Diane Silbernagel, executive director of CFCS, “The gifts to Partners in Faith make it possible to make these immediate and needed repairs. Our agencies never have money in the budget to make facilities improvements because funding is usually used for direct services and programming to help our clients, especially in the case of an emergency. For example, if they need groceries or are at risk of losing their homes.”

Many of the CFCS buildings were used for other diocesan operations and were handed down to Catholic Charities as the need for social service agencies grew over the decades. Some of these buildings include the CFCS main office on DeGrasse Street, which was built in 1896 and is the former Chancery office for the Paterson Diocese, and Father English Center, which was built in 1904 and is the former St. Boniface Church, which was closed in 1976.

CFCS falls under one of diocesan Catholic Charities three main umbrellas. The other two are the Department for Persons with Disabilities (DPD), which provides group homes and programs in all three counties for those with developmental disabilities, and Straight and Narrow in Paterson, which helps individuals with mental health and substance abuse issues.

Silbernagel said, “Every year, we see an increase in the amount of people who need help. At the same time funding from the government and other resources is less every year. Last year, we saw Morris County have the largest jump of people needing direct services. A number of these individuals are adults in his or her 50s, who lost jobs or hours were cut. Often, they have families with children going to college. They are not eligible for government assistance because they are not yet a senior or disabled.”

Future plans for the next few years include also working at the facilities of the Partnership for Social Services in Franklin, the Passaic Teen Center in Passaic, the Hispanic Information Center in Passaic and some of the agency’s daycare centers and preschools in Paterson.

“Most of the work is repairing roofs, fixing water damage, replacing windows and installing security systems. In the future, we also hope to upgrade our phone system so all of our CFCS agencies are under one system,” said Silbernagel.

In addition to Catholic Charities, PIF is also supporting parishes, diocesan schools, the Cathedral of St. John the Baptist and healthcare for diocesan priests.

“We are grateful for the donations and pledges made to PIF and we will stretch it as far as we can. Just as it is important that we help the people in need, it is important we are able to maintain safe facilities. The people are always so generous to Catholic Charities,” said Silbernagel.

Read the full article at http://www.evergreeneditions.com/article/+Updating+An+Aging+Infrastructure/1808382/224845/article.html.

Statue Of Mary Now Visible To All In Prayer Garden At Little Falls Parish

Michael Wojcik

[EDITOR’S NOTE: This is the seventh in a series featuring many of the shrines, prayer gardens, rosary walks and other devotional sites at parishes across the diocese.]

LITTLE FALLS Once again, a tall, white statue of the Blessed Mother has found a rightful place in the sun outside Our Lady of the Holy Angels Church here. Earlier this year, relocation of the striking devotional object brought it from behind a thicket of overgrown bushes and into an open to a space on the side of the church, where visitors can pray. Yet the pastor of this Passaic County faith community thinks that the marble statue of Mary shines brightest at night in the glow of a new spotlight.

Today, that statue stands in Holy Angels’ new prayer garden dedicated to the Blessed Virgin, located on the side of the church between one of the front stairs and a two-story elevator tower. Several green shrubs and a row of yellow flowers surround the statue and invite people to pray and reflect before the sacred image. Fittingly, Msgr. T. Mark Condon, Holy Angels’ pastor, dedicated this new sacred space on Aug. 22, the Feast of the Queenship of Mary.

“People have taken to the prayer garden. They come before and after Mass to pray. They come all throughout the course of the day. It’s a beautiful and peaceful place and is a sign of encouragement to people,” Msgr. Condon said. “Also, the statue of Mary reminds us that the Blessed Virgin Mary is always our Mother and intercessor. It looks even more impressive at night with the new light on her,” he said.

For years, that statue was hidden in plain sight. Originally located on a landing between the two main staircases in front of Holy Angels Church, it got so completely covered by shrubbery that many parishioners passed by it without even knowing it was there. Earlier this year, the shrubs were removed from around the statue and it was relocated to a small patch of land between the church and a driveway that leads from Route 23 to the parking lot at the rear of the church.

This statue of Mary originally came from afar — the former St. Joseph Seminary of the Holy Name Province of the Order of the Friars Minor in Calicoon, N.Y., when it closed in the 1990s — thanks to Franciscan Father Thomas Gallagher, one of Holy Angels’ former pastors. The Franciscans had served the parish for 125 years, since its founding, before they turned its administration over to the Paterson Diocese in 2008.

The creation of the prayer garden follows a series of major and minor improvements to Holy Angels Church in recent years, including renovation of the worship space, installation of an elevator and repair of the church hall after extensive flooding. Its statue of Mary joins other devotional areas on Holy Angles campus, including an image of Our Lady of the Holy Angels in mosaics above the doors of the church and the Shrine to Our Lady of the Highway on the front lawn of the church [see related story at right].

“I think the prayer garden is wonderful. Mary welcomes you into the church as you pull into the parking lot. It’s an invitation to spend time with Jesus and Mary,” said Betty Gallagher, a Holy Angels parishioner and the mother of Father Gallagher. “When I pray to Mary — not just at the prayer garden, it makes me feel calm and peaceful. It reminds me that whatever happens in life, I will get through it,” she said.

Read the full article at http://www.evergreeneditions.com/article/Statue+Of+Mary+Now+Visible+To+All+In+Prayer+Garden+At+Little+Falls+Parish/1808383/224845/article.html.

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