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The Beacon January 22, 2015 : Page 1

3 POPE C ONFIRM S CA NONIZ A TION IN D. C ., VI S IT TO NEW YORK C ITY SUSSEX PASSAIC THE A W A RDWINNING NEW S P A PER OF THE R. C . DIO C E S E OF P A TER S ON, N.J. MORRIS JANUARY 22, 2015 ‘Proclaim the Good News!’ 5 2 P A TER S ON FEDER A TION KNIGHT S OF C OLUMBU S HOLD A NNU A L BI S HOP’ S NIGHT C ELEBR A TING CA THOLI C SC HOOL S WEEK IN THE P A TER S ON DIO C E S E Bishop issues challenge to young adults during Mass at St. Paul Inside the Walls By MICHAEL WOJCIK NE WS EDIT OR MADISON Bishop Serratelli chal-8-21 22 RELIGIOU S S ET OPEN HOU S E S FOR YE A R OF C ON S E C R A TED LIFE lenged young adults of the Pater -son Diocese to follow the example of Andrew, the first Apostle of Jesus, who realized that Christ was the Messiah after having cultivated a close relationship with him and immediately began proclaiming the “Good News” of the Gospel to people. This past Saturday, Bishop Serratelli issued that challenge dur-ing his Mass with the young adults of the diocese at 5:30 p.m. at St. Paul Inside the Walls: the Catholic Center for Evangelization Center at Bayley-Ellard here. The staff expect-ed 50 young adults, but scrambled to accommodate the more than 200 people, who eventually filled the center’s chapel. The vigil Mass for the Second Sunday in Ordinary Time was followed by a reception, also attended by the bishop, who was main celebrant and homilist of the special liturgy. “Only when there is a purpose in what we are doing is there sat-isfaction in our hearts and joy in our lives,” said Bishop Serratelli, who re-counted the story (Jn. 1:35-42) when John the Baptist points out Jesus at the Messiah to Andrew, his first Apostle, who, with great joy, goes to spend time with him. “One on one, Andrew encounters Jesus and knows immediately that his work preparing for the Messiah has not be in vain, for this is the road that brought him to Jesus. He sees even more clearly those conversa-tions with Jesus, where he could en-ter into a deeper friendship with LIVES OF FAITH Bishop Serratelli was the main celebrant and homilist of a BEACON PHOTO | JOE GIGLI Mass with the young adults of the diocese on Jan. 17 at St. Paul Inside the Walls, Madison. During a reception after, (from left) Brian Honsberger, coordinator of diocesan youth and young adult ministry; Eniola Honsberger, his wife and director of the diocesan Office of Family Life; Marianne Mpakarakes; Julie Buechner; and Beatriz Capella, enjoy the smiles and joyful sounds of Capella’s twins and the Honsbergers’ godchildren, Sebastian and Oliver. For more photos, see page 24. Jesus and, therefore, into a deeper relationship with God himself,” the bishop said. Then, Andrew shouts the “Good News,” after he realizes that, though New Chief Finance Officer named for diocese CLIFTON Bishop Serratelli an-nounced the appointment Jan. 20 of Patrick Brennan of Glen Rock as the Diocese of Paterson’s new Chief Finance Officer (CFO). “I am happy to welcome Patrick as our new Chief Finance Officer. The heart of our diocese is evange-lization. We cannot spread the mes-5 6-7 25-27 23 W HAT T O D O V IEWPOINT C LASSIFIEDS O BITUARIES DO NOT DELAY — TIME SENSITIVE NEWS sage of Jesus without the wise ad-ministration of our temporal re-sources. I know that Patrick will help us continue to invest wisely, manage prudently, and focus best practices in every area of our dio-cese’s financial life,” the bishop said. “Patrick’s reputation as a collabora-tive leader should be an asset to our entire diocese.” According to the bishop, at their last meeting members of the Diocesan Finance Council “spoke with great approval on the positive strides that have been made in the financial management and practices of the diocese. Challenges, which might have seemed insurmountable in the past, have now been turned around. With Patrick, I know that we will continue to make great progress. Our forward direction is a tribute to the work of our diocesan staff, pastors, administrators, agen -cies, and offices.” Brennan brings to the diocesan post extensive management and leadership experience and best prac-tices knowledge in non-profit ad-ministration, finance, accounting, planning and budgeting, communi-cations and reporting, advancement, operations, facility management, and information technology. “Being named the CFO of the Paterson Diocese,” Brennan said, “is a capstone of my life-long vocation to serve the Church and its people. It’s a terrific and unique opportunity to contribute my financial and man-agement experience to help build up and sustain the Kingdom of God in the Paterson Diocese now and for future generations.” He comes to the diocese from CFO on 4 a personal relationship with Jesus, he is the Messiah. “So too when each of us knows the Lord Jesus personally, others will come to Jesus because of our faith. And then, there will be great joy,” Bishop Serratelli said. The Mass attracted members of St. Paul Young Adults — one of St. Paul’s first outreaches — and young adults from other parish-based groups or individually. Concele -brating were: Father Paul Manning, St. Paul’s executive director and diocesan vicar for evangelization; Father Kevin Corcoran, priest-secre-tary to the bishop and diocesan vice chancellor; and Father Przemyslaw Nowak, parochial vicar of As sump -tion Parish, Morristown, who brought members of the Morris County faith community’s Young Catholic Professionals group. The music ministry of St. Paul’s Young Adults led congregants in songs of praise. “So many people have come — young adults who come to our reg-ular 11 a.m. Mass on Sundays and others. I welcome all of you,” said Father Manning, who thanked YOUNG ADULT MASS on 24

‘Proclaim The Good News!’

Michael Wojcik

Bishop Issues Challenge To Young Adults During Mass At St. Paul Inside The Walls

MADISON Bishop Serratelli challenged young adults of the Pater - son Diocese to follow the example of Andrew, the first Apostle of Jesus, who realized that Christ was the Messiah after having cultivated a close relationship with him and immediately began proclaiming the “Good News” of the Gospel to people.

This past Saturday, Bishop Serratelli issued that challenge during his Mass with the young adults of the diocese at 5:30 p.m. at St. Paul Inside the Walls: the Catholic Center for Evangelization Center at Bayley-Ellard here. The staff expected 50 young adults, but scrambled to accommodate the more than 200 people, who eventually filled the center’s chapel. The vigil Mass for the Second Sunday in Ordinary Time was followed by a reception, also attended by the bishop, who was main celebrant and homilist of the special liturgy.

“Only when there is a purpose in what we are doing is there satisfaction in our hearts and joy in our lives,” said Bishop Serratelli, who recounted the story (Jn. 1:35-42) when John the Baptist points out Jesus at the Messiah to Andrew, his first Apostle, who, with great joy, goes to spend time with him. “One on one, Andrew encounters Jesus and knows immediately that his work preparing for the Messiah has not be in vain, for this is the road that brought him to Jesus. He sees even more clearly those conversations with Jesus, where he could enter into a deeper friendship with Jesus and, therefore, into a deeper relationship with God himself,” the bishop said.

Then, Andrew shouts the “Good News,” after he realizes that, though a personal relationship with Jesus, he is the Messiah. “So too when each of us knows the Lord Jesus personally, others will come to Jesus because of our faith. And then, there will be great joy,” Bishop Serratelli said.

The Mass attracted members of St. Paul Young Adults — one of St. Paul’s first outreaches — and young adults from other parish-based groups or individually. Concelebrating were: Father Paul Manning, St. Paul’s executive director and diocesan vicar for evangelization; Father Kevin Corcoran, priest-secretary to the bishop and diocesan vice chancellor; and Father Przemyslaw Nowak, parochial vicar of As sumption Parish, Morristown, who brought members of the Morris County faith community’s Young Catholic Professionals group. The music ministry of St. Paul’s Young Adults led congregants in songs of praise.

“So many people have come — young adults who come to our regular 11 a.m. Mass on Sundays and others. I welcome all of you,” said Father Manning, who thanke Bishop Serratelli for visiting St. Paul’s for the Mass. “Young adult ministry is one of our priorities [at St. Paul’s and in the diocese]. The bishop [who dedicated St. Paul’s in 2010] decided that this could be a place, where the Gospel is heard, loved and proclaimed.”

St. Paul’s Young Adults group has helped bring young people back to the faith through activities geared for their generation, including socials, faith-based discussions; liturgies, service projects and contemporary Catholic music concerts. Members of this tight-knit group support each other in the significant milestones during this time in their lives, including jobs, marriages, children — and even vocations. Ultimately, St. Paul’s strives to inspire these young adults to become active in their local parishes.

After last Saturday’s Mass, Trevor Jones, who ministers to young adults at St. Paul’s, called Bishop Serratelli’s visit with the young adults “a good sign for the diocese and the Church.” The bishop “makes people feel important in the Church,” which will encourage them to come back — to St. Paul’s and the Church, he said.

During the reception, 32-year-old Peter Palumbo from St. Paul’s Young Adults talked to The Beacon about how he discovered a revitalized faith — and love — through the group. This infrastructure project manager has driven up from the Metuchen Diocese to participate in the group’s activities and helps plan its social outreaches. Palumbo said that his participation at St. Paul’s also led him to meet his girlfriend.

“Four years ago, I was looking to get back into the faith. I loved the wonderful homilies and music at the Sunday morning Masses here. It was energetic and drove me to know more about my faith,” said Palumbo, who noted that St. Paul Young Adults fills an critical need — sponsoring an outreach to young adults that most parishes do not offer. “The people here genuinely care about your journey of faith.”

Toward the end of Mass, Bishop Serratelli called the presence of the young adults, who filled St. Paul’s chapel “a great encouragement to me and my brother priests with me here tonight” and “a sign of your faith and personal response to Jesus.” He told the congregation that in the Gospel, Jesus often called people, who were in relation to one another, like his call to his cousin, John the Baptist.

“Families and relationships are important and that’s why we need to come together with our families as often as we can or with the family of God that is the Church,” said Bishop Serratelli, who made note of both recent violent attacks on religious freedom around the world and the ongoing “hollowing out of traditional Christianity.”

“If there is any time for us to know the Lord, know his Gospel and witness to it, it is today,” the bishop said.

Read the full article at http://www.evergreeneditions.com/article/%E2%80%98Proclaim+The+Good+News%21%E2%80%99/1911405/243253/article.html.

New Chief Finance Officer Named For Diocese

CLIFTON Bishop Serratelli announced the appointment Jan. 20 of Patrick Brennan of Glen Rock as the Diocese of Paterson’s new Chief Finance Officer (CFO).

“I am happy to welcome Patrick as our new Chief Finance Officer. The heart of our diocese is evangelization. We cannot spread the message of Jesus without the wise administration of our temporal resources. I know that Patrick will help us continue to invest wisely, manage prudently, and focus best practices in every area of our diocese’s financial life,” the bishop said. “Patrick’s reputation as a collaborative leader should be an asset to our entire diocese.”

According to the bishop, at their last meeting members of the Diocesan Finance Council “spoke with great approval on the positive strides that have been made in the financial management and practices of the diocese. Challenges, which might have seemed insurmountable in the past, have now been turned around. With Patrick, I know that we will continue to make great progress. Our forward direction is a tribute to the work of our diocesan staff, pastors, administrators, agencies, and offices.”

Brennan brings to the diocesan post extensive management and leadership experience and best practices knowledge in non-profit administration, finance, accounting, planning and budgeting, communications and reporting, advancement, operations, facility management, and information technology.

“Being named the CFO of the Paterson Diocese,” Brennan said, “is a capstone of my life-long vocation to serve the Church and its people. It’s a terrific and unique opportunity to contribute my financial and management experience to help build up and sustain the Kingdom of God in the Paterson Diocese now and for future generations.”

He comes to the diocese from KIPP NYC, a non-profit network of free, public charter schools that prepare students for success in college and life. It is comprised of five middle schools, five elementary schools, one high school, and KIPP Through College, a comprehensive support program for alumni. KIPP NYC currently serves more than 5,400 students and alumni; 88 percent are from low-income families in the South Bronx, Harlem and Crown Heights and 97 percent are African American or Latino. KIPP also employs more than 600 professionals, and has a combined operating budget of more than $80 million. In the non-profit field, he has also worked for the Newark public school system, and the international Jewish humanitarian fund, which manages compensation for victims of the Holocaust.

Brennan, who earned his bachelor’s degree in economics from New York University and his MBA in general management from the Amos Tuck School of Business Administration at Dartmouth College, Hanover, N.H., spent several years working with PricewaterhouseCoopers in its CFO practice. He has also worked for Mellon Asset Management as Chief Financial and Administrative Officer and for Morgan Stanley as Chief Administrative Officer.

His wife of 27 years, Ann Marie (O’Malley) Brennan, whom he met at the Newman Catholic Center at NYU when they were students, is a mathematics teacher at St. Joseph Regional High School in Montvale. They are active at their parish, St. Catharine’s in Glen Rock, and its inter-parochial grammar school, Academy of Our Lady. Brennan has served as chair of the parish’s technology committee; as co-chair of Renew; as a member and chair of its buildings and grounds committee, and as vice president of the school advisory board. They have four children, three boys and a girl, ranging in age from 26 to 17.

In addition to their work at the parish, both he and his wife have been active leaders with Christian Life Community (CLC) in the New York area and nationally since they were engaged. CLC is a worldwide Ignatian lay association, formerly known as the Sodalities of Mary, whose members pray, discern and act to live out Gospel values in their daily lives. He has served as national secretary of CLC-USA and he has led strategic planning and new community formation and worked with CLC Kenya to help fund education for Kibera AIDS orphans.

According to Msgr. James Mahoney, vicar general and moderator of the Curia, the diocesan search committee for a new Chief Finance Officer was able to select 10 candidates to interview from a pool of 105 applicants.

“The search committee, composed of persons representing various segments of diocesan life and boards, became quite comfortable with the fact that a number of the final candidates could have done the job,” said Msgr. Mahoney. “This made the ultimate decision very difficult in terms of choosing, but very comforting in terms of knowing that great people were available.” He said the committee focused on four areas: breadth and depth of financial experience and administration; technical competency; emotional intelligence with a clear record of collaboration and team building; professional employment with non-profit organizations and volunteer work with non-profit organizations.

Msgr. Mahoney said, “Patrick should be an outstanding Chief Finance Officer for the diocese. His background includes a very unique mix of job experiences: Chief Operating Officer for non-profit charter schools serving the poor; CFO and COO for major financial firms; global administrator for a major consulting firm’s CFO consulting practice.”

The bishop added “I am very grateful to Jolanta Londene, our diocesan Controller, who has assumed the responsibilities of Acting Chief Finance Officer until Patrick actually begins his responsibilities on March 15.”

Read the full article at http://www.evergreeneditions.com/article/New+Chief+Finance+Officer+Named+For+Diocese/1911411/243253/article.html.

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