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The Beacon Beacon March 12 2015 : Page 1

C ONFE SS ION S EVERY MOND A Y NIGHT IN EVERY C HUR C H, 78:30 P.M. UNTIL M A R C H 23 SUSSEX PASSAIC THE A W A RDWINNING NEW S P A PER OF THE R. C . DIO C E S E OF P A TER S ON, N.J. MORRIS MARCH 12, 2015 C ATHEDRAL R ESTORATION ‘F AITH ,J OY ,F AMILY ’ USCCB director of evangelization to lead Diocesan Catechetical Conference April 11 By CECILE SAN AGUSTIN REPOR TER 12 4 The Catholic Center for Evangelization at Bayley-Ellard DPD’ S GOLDEN A NNIVER SA RY BEGIN S WITH BUILDING OF NEW GROUP HOME 16 F A THER KEVIN C OR C OR A N HONORED AS ‘PER S ON OF THE YE A R’ PHOTO | REBECA RUIZ-ULLOA 8-9 10-11 12 13 14-15 DO NOT DELAY — TIME SENSITIVE NEWS Y OUTH V IEWPOINT W HAT T O D O O BITUARIES C LASSIFIEDS Scaffolding envelops the Cathedral of St. John the Baptist in Paterson to facilitate roofing and masonry repairs. Simultaneously, the attic has been cleared from debris to facilitate truss reinforcement repairs. The work is part of the restoration of the cathedral — started last fall — which is being made possible by the generous pledges of the faithful to the diocese’s highly successful Partners in Faith Capital and Endowment Campaign. Along with the cathedral renovation, the Partners in Faith campaign supported Catholic Charities, parishes, schools and healthcare for priests. CLIFTON Faith formation starts with building relationships with families. That’s the important message that will be delivered when the Diocese of Paterson hosts a daylong Cate -chetical Conference on Satur day, April 11 from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. at the St. John Paul II Center here. Themed “Faith, Joy, Family,” Peter J. Murphy, executive director of the Secre tariat for Evangeliza tion and Catechesis for the U.S. Confer -ence of Catholic Bishops (USCCB), will explore the theme and examine the question, “How can we (parish-es) can use our catechetical pro-grams to build relationships with families and create opportunities for faith?” Catechists, priests, religious edu-cation teachers, youth ministers, RCIA coordinators and Catholics in evangelization ministry are invited to the conference to learn about building relationships and igniting the faith among the followers of Jesus Christ. Spanish-speaking cat-echists are also invited as there will be a simultaneous translation of Murphy’s talks from English into Spanish. In a letter to catechists inviting them to the conference, Bishop “Because of today’s fast-paced, technology-driven society, the conference will bring attendees back to the basics when Jesus personally invited people to the faith. SOLT F ATHER D EREK A NDERSON Serratelli wrote: “As you know well, catechesis involves much more than a simple passing on of facts about God and His laws. Effective catech-esis must lead people in all stages of faith formation to an intimate re-lationship with Jesus Christ and his Church so they can discover his per-sonal love for them, learn to live ac-‘FAITH, JOY, FAMILY’ on 5 ST. PAUL INSIDE THE WALLS MADISON Digital technology, which includes email, websites, text mes-saging and social media, has been giving Catholics around the world the tools to get more involved in the mission of the New Evangelization. Learning how to properly use these tools of technology to reach out in new and innovative ways to evangelize was the focus of an all-day conference, “The Digital Church,” March 7 at St. Paul Inside the Walls: the Diocesan Center for Evangeli -zation at Bayley-Ellard here. Catholics learn how to use new media to evangelize at conference including computers, audio and in St. Paul’s auditorium. “Technolo -— featured presentations by gy has drastically changed the way The Digital Church video three Catholic pioneers in Catholic that we communicate. We need to By MICHAEL WOJCIK NE WS EDIT OR More than 125 Catholics came to St. Paul’s, including clergy, reli-gious, teachers and laity from around the diocese and beyond, to understand how to craft messages that inform and inspire people, spark conversation, generate greater participation in their parishes, schools or Catholic organization and make communications more effi-cient and effective for people the Church serves. The anticipated event — which showcased the use of multimedia, digital media: Josh Simmons, founder and CEO of eCatholic; Brandon Vogt, blogger, author and speaker; and Matthew Warner, founder and CEO of Flocknote. Participants came from as far away as Washington, D.C. and West Point, N.Y. “The question for the Church is ‘How can we tell our story in fresh and creative ways?’ We need to pro-claim the Gospel, not from the rooftops, but the laptops,” said Vogt, during the conference that was held change the way that we communi-cate. We must be speaking the same language,” he said. Today, Catholics can reach peo-ple, who have fallen away from the Church effectively through a number of digital technologies. YouTube, a popular video-sharing site, attracts 1 trillion views per year. FaceBook boasts 1 billion users, who enjoy sharing posts, photos, stories and videos. Twitter, which limits posts to 140 characters each, fields 400 mil-CONFERENCE on 2

USCCB Director Of Evangelization To Lead Diocesan Catechetical Conference April 11

Cecile San Agustin

‘FAITH, JOY, FAMILY’

CLIFTON Faith formation starts with building relationships with families. That’s the important message that will be delivered when the Diocese of Paterson hosts a daylong Cate-chetical Conference on Saturday, April 11 from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. at the St. John Paul II Center here.

Themed “Faith, Joy, Family,” Peter J. Murphy, executive director of the Secretariat for Evangelization and Catechesis for the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops (USCCB), will explore the theme and examine the question, “How can we (parishes) can use our catechetical programs to build relationships with families and create opportunities for faith?”

Catechists, priests, religious education teachers, youth ministers, RCIA coordinators and Catholics in evangelization ministry are invited to the conference to learn about building relationships and igniting the faith among the followers of Jesus Christ. Spanish-speaking catechists are also invited as there will be a simultaneous translation of Murphy’s talks from English into Spanish.

In a letter to catechists inviting them to the conference, Bishop Serratelli wrote: “As you know well, catechesis involves much more than a simple passing on of facts about God and His laws. Effective catechesis must lead people in all stages of faith formation to an intimate relationship with Jesus Christ and his Church so they can discover his personal love for them, learn to live according to his will within the Church, and invite others to join in this journey.”

The bishop will celebrate a 4 p.m. vigil Mass marking Divine Mercy Sunday to end the conference.

During the conference, Murphy will lead two sessions. The morning session will focus on the vital role of relationships as the first step of the evangelization process and how to accompany students and their parents on this faith journey. In the afternoon session, he will discuss new and practical ideas to spark a genuine faith and commitment to Jesus’ teachings.

According to SOLT Father Derek Anderson, pastor of St. Mary Parish in Dover and director of the diocesan Office of Catechesis, which is organizing and sponsoring the conference, the theme surrounding family was inspired by Acts of the Apostles 16:34, “And with his household they rejoiced at having come to faith in God.”

“We came up with the theme a year ago realizing we wanted to focus on these three aspects of faith, joy and family,” Father Anderson said. “Many times we think CCD programs are just meant for children. We discussed how we can use our parish CCD programs and reach out to families. This whole conference will discuss the first two steps and phases of evangelization.”

Father Anderson said the first step for evangelization isn’t about teaching but about encountering the person, building relationships, listening and understanding them and learning about their lives. From there, “It’s the second phase where we begin to communicate the very simple and basic terms of the heart of the Gospel message,” he said.

The third step is the actual catechesis followed by ongoing formation. The final phase is leading those who went through the process to be evangelizers themselves.

“We can no longer presume the first two phases have taken place before people come to religious education classes,” said Father Anderson. “Whether they are a child or an adult, it is a process every baptized Catholic should pass through.”

Following each session by Murphy, breakout sessions will take place facilitated by catechists in the diocese and beyond in the pastoral center’s classrooms. Catechists will be grouped according to those they serve: elementary-aged students, high school Confirmation candidates and youth ministry, adult faith formation and RCIA. There will also be breakout sessions for clergy and parish staff. The breakout sessions will also offer separate English and Spanish tracks for all participants. The first session will focus on Murphy’s talk while the second session will give catechists the opportunity to brainstorm, share ideas and gain practical information to use for their parish’s religious education programs.

For those in Basic Catechist Certifi cation/Validation programs, the conference counts for six credit hours in “Scripture and Theology” or “Catechetics and Methodology.”

Shannon Civetta, one of the break-out session leaders, is a catechist and volunteer of the children’s ministry at Resurrection Parish in Randolph. “As catechists, we are always looking for new ways to share our faith to others,” she said. “It’s great when we are able to talk to other catechists and learn practical things to bring back to our parishes. I remember learning a new way to teach about the Sacrament of Reconciliation and it really connected with the children. The conference will allow us to come together and learn new, fresh ideas.”

During the event, publishers will set up booths to display their catechetical books and materials. Many of the materials will focus specifically on the beginning phases of evangelization.

Because of today’s fast-paced, technology- driven society, Father Anderson said, “The conference will bring attendees back to the basics when Jesus personally invited people to the faith. Personal relationships have a greater meaning than the digital connections many young people are familiar with. We are looking for a conversion and transformation that does bring joy and a greater communion in the family.”

The $50 cost per person includes lunch.

[Register at www.insidethewalls.org or call the Diocesan Office of Catechesis (973) 437-2129. Registration closes March 27.]

Read the full article at http://www.evergreeneditions.com/article/USCCB+Director+Of+Evangelization+To+Lead+Diocesan+Catechetical+Conference+April+11/1951375/249701/article.html.

Catholics Learn How To Use New Media To Evangelize At Conference

Michael Wojcik

The Digital Church

MADISON Digital technology, which includes email, websites, text messaging and social media, has been giving Catholics around the world the tools to get more involved in the mission of the New Evangelization.

Learning how to properly use these tools of technology to reach out in new and innovative ways to evangelize was the focus of an all-day conference, “The Digital Church,” March 7 at St. Paul Inside the Walls: the Diocesan Center for Evangelization at Bayley-Ellard here.

More than 125 Catholics came to St. Paul’s, including clergy, religious, teachers and laity from around the diocese and beyond, to understand how to craft messages that inform and inspire people, spark conversation, generate greater participation in their parishes, schools or Catholic organization and make communications more efficient and effective for people the Church serves.

The anticipated event — which showcased the use of multimedia, including computers, audio and video — featured presentations by three Catholic pioneers in Catholic digital media: Josh Simmons, founder and CEO of eCatholic; Brandon Vogt, blogger, author and speaker; and Matthew Warner, founder and CEO of Flocknote. Participants came from as far away as Washington, D.C. and West Point, N. Y.“

The question for the Church is ‘How can we tell our story in fresh and creative ways?’ We need to proclaim the Gospel, not from the rooftops, but the laptops,” said Vogt, during the conference that was held in St. Paul’s auditorium. “Technology has drastically changed the way that we communicate. We need to change the way that we communicate. We must be speaking the same language,” he said.

Today, Catholics can reach people, who have fallen away from the Church effectively through a number of digital technologies. YouTube, a popular video-sharing site, attracts 1 trillion views per year. FaceBook boasts 1 billion users, who enjoy sharing posts, photos, stories and videos. Twitter, which limits posts to 140 characters each, fields 400 million “tweets” per day. Text messaging has become the most popular way that young people communicate; people send about 8 million texts per day, Vogt said.

Before any Catholic organization starts to use any form of new media, it must ask a fundamental question that will help it assess its communication needs: Why does it exist?

Then it should start planning, using the POST method in determining: People — who is your audience? Objectives — what do you want to achieve by interacting with the audience? Strategy — how do you connect with the audience? And Technology — which media tools will help you achieve that? Vogt said.

“Your website is the first impression of your organization. If it’s boring or ugly or has out-of-date information, people will think that your parish is boring or has nothing going on,” said Simmons, who emphasized the importance of maintaining an informative and attractive website, noting that most people, who move into a new town use search engines, such as Google to find local parishes. “Your Web site is your home base. It has to be great. It’s open 24/7, even you are sleeping. It’s about engagement — how to use your website to plug people into your parish,” he said.

When designing a website, parishes need to consider what the two types of visitors — first-timers and returning — are looking for on the site. The site should sport a “clear, simple” layout with consistent colors, fonts and ways of navigating through the pages and sections. The home page should feature no more that five pieces of information, especially items that they most often want to see, such as Mass times. Pages should be adorned with “beautiful and rich imagery” — more pictures, perhaps of the parish church or its stained-glass windows, and less text. Also, the website should be easily readable on mobile devices, such as smart phones, Vogt said.

A successful website contains dynamic content that keeps visitors coming back, Vogt told the crowd. “Continue to update the site with fresh content and up-to-date news items. Consider using a more engaging format such as videos to communicate the importance of an upcoming event, rather than writing a long description of it,” Vogt, a convert to Catholicism, said.

“We need to break through the noise of the Internet and engage people in dialogue, talking with others, listening to them and relating to them,” said Warner, who urged parishes to encourage people to reply to open comments. “In the end, we should be asking if there is a meaningful relationship, if they are coming back and if they are benefiting from what we are posting.”

Parishes should consider joining social networks, such as FaceBook, Google +, Twitter, LinkedIn, Pinterest and Instagram, but should also consider using email and texting, which people still read in large numbers. In fostering two-way communication, parishes should ask people for their email addresses and cell phone numbers, so faith communities have a way to reach out to them, Warner said.

“People want information, inspiration and conversation [when they use digital media]. Jesus calls us to radical service. New media gives us the tools to reach out to people more effectively. Now, we must be inspiring, get excited about what we are doing and tell our story,” said Warner.

The conference also included presentations on “The Five Secrets to Evangelizing Online” and “The Game Plan” — ways that participants can apply the lessons leaned that day, along with a question-and-answer session.

During the conference, Father Paul Manning, St. Paul’s executive director and diocesan vicar for evangelization, suggested that the event dovetails with the mission of the diocesan evangelization center: to be “a leader, model and catalyst for the New Evangelization, inspiring people of all ages, backgrounds, beliefs, professions and perspectives” to a deeper relationship with Jesus and “to find a place in the Church.”

“Pope Benedict XVI encouraged Catholics to share the saving truth of Jesus with the tools available,” said Father Manning, who noted that St. Paul’s plans to hold a follow-up session to “The Digital Church” for parishes and other Catholic organizations.

Read the full article at http://www.evergreeneditions.com/article/Catholics+Learn+How+To+Use+New+Media+To+Evangelize+At+Conference/1951378/249701/article.html.

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