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The Beacon The Beacon March 19 2015 : Page 1

CONFESSIONS EVERY MONDAY NIGHT IN EVERY CHURCH, 78:30 P.M. UNTIL MARCH 23 SUSSEX PASSAIC THE AWARDWINNING NEWSPAPER OF THE R.C. DIOCESE OF PATERSON, N.J. MORRIS MARCH 19, 2015 At 250, St. Joseph Parish in West Milford celebrates distinction as oldest faith community in diocese, N.J. 12 3 7 The Catholic Center for Evangelization at Bayley-Ellard RANDOLPH PARISHIONER LEADS GROWING BIBLE STUDY PROGRAM DIOCESAN SEMINARIANS INSTITUTED IN MINISTRY OF ACOLYTE 4-6 10-11 12-13 13 14-15 DO NOT DELAY — TIME SENSITIVE NEWS Y OUTH V IEWPOINT W HAT T O D O O BITUARIES C LASSIFIEDS pastor of St. Anthony Parish, Hawthorne. From those hum-ble beginnings, St. Joseph has WEST MILFORD This past Sat -grown to a parish of 800 fam-ur day, Bishop Serratelli con-ilies, who also used this land-cluded celebrations for a mile-mark anniversary to celebrate stone of truly superlative pro-its faith-filled present and portions both historically and bright future. Msgr. Kupke was spiritually: the 250th anniver-a concelebrant of the Mass sary of St. Joseph Parish here, March 14 along with Father which encouraged the faith Sigmund Peplowski, a former community to explore its legacy pastor of St. Joseph’s, who is as the “The Cradle of the now pastor of Sacred Heart of Catholic Church in New Jersey.” Jesus and St. Cecilia parishes The rural Passaic County in Rock away. parish holds the distinction of “We are proud of the being the oldest Catholic faith strength of the mothers and fa-community, not only in the thers who founded St. Joseph’s Paterson Diocese, but also in without much equipment [or in-New Jersey. frastructure],” said Father Bishop Serratelli was the Steven Shadwell, St. Joseph’s BEACON PHOTO | JOE GIGLI main celebrant and homilist of pastor, about the anniversary, the 5 p.m. Mass March 14 in HAPPY ANNIVERSARY Bishop Serratelli blesses a new Book of Gospels and a new lectern which opened with a Mass by St. Joseph Church, filled to ca-honoring St. Luke during a Mass on March 14 at St. Joseph Parish, West Milford. The Mass Bishop Serratelli last March. pacity, to celebrate a watershed marked the conclusion of the Passaic County faith community’s 250th anniversary cele -“Today, there is still a strength moment: the end of yearlong brations. With the bishop are Father Sigmund Peplowski, former pastor; altar server Theresa of spirit and great love at St. 250th anniversary observations Santa Lucia and seminarian Henry Pinto. Joseph’s. The people are so easy that enabled the Passaic County to minister to. They see this as parish to revisit its rich missionary and pioneer looked back at the German immigrants, who their parish, not just a church that they go to. history. That day, the bishop also dedicated a founded the Catholic settlement that would be-They are heirs to a great history and they intend new lectern in honor of St. Luke, the first parish’s come St. Joseph’s, upon their arrival in the U.S. to propel it forward,” he said. in 1765 — and would become what is believed original namesake. Today, parishioners “dare to live their faith” Guided by the anniversary theme, “Daring to to be N.J.’s oldest faith community, according to through St. Joseph’s broad spectrum of spiritual 250 on 8 Practice Our Faith for 250 Years,” St. Joseph’s Msgr. Raymond Kupke, diocesan archivist and NE WS EDIT OR By MICHAEL WOJCIK FROM THE VATICAN ‘A J UBILEE OF M ERCY ’ By ELISE HARRIS CNA / E W TN NE WS On second anniversary, Pope Francis declares Extraordinary Holy Year of ‘God’s Forgiveness’ woman of our time,” Pope Francis said. The “Extraordinary Holy Year of Mercy, he said, “will be a moment for the entire Church to spread the word of God’s forgiveness.” The Jubilee, also called a Holy Year, will open this year on Dec. 8 — the Solemnity of the Immaculate Conception — and will close Nov. 20, 2016 with the Solemnity of Our Lord Jesus Christ, King of the Universe. It will also coincide with the 50th POPE on 2 ROME Pope Francis announced an extraordinary Jubilee to start at the end of the year, which will be ded-icated to a theme close to the pon-tiff’s heart: mercy. “Dear brothers and sisters, I have thought about how the Church can make clear its mission of being a witness of mercy,” the pope told those at his penitential liturgy in St. Peter’s Basilica on March 13, which Mercy “is the best thing we can feel: it changes the world.” P OPE F RANCIS also marked the two-year anniver-sary of his election as pontiff. “It’s a journey that starts with a spiritual conversion. For this reason I have decided to declare an Extraordinary Jubilee that has the mercy of God at its center. It will be a Holy Year of Mercy.” The biblical passage for the Holy Year’s theme is from Luke Chapter 6 verse 36, in which Jesus tells his disciples, “Be merciful as your Father is merciful.” “I am convinced that the whole Church will be able to find in this Jubilee the joy of rediscovering and making fruitful the mercy of God, with which we are all called to give consolation to every man and every

At 250, St. Joseph Parish In West Milford Celebrates Distinction As Oldest Faith Community In Diocese, N.J.

Michael Wojcik

WEST MILFORD This past Saturday, Bishop Serratelli concluded celebrations for a milestone of truly superlative proportions both historically and spiritually: the 250th anniversary of St. Joseph Parish here, which encouraged the faith community to explore its legacy as the “The Cradle of the Catholic Church in New Jersey.”

The rural Passaic County parish holds the distinction of being the oldest Catholic faith community, not only in the Paterson Diocese, but also in New Jersey.

Bishop Serratelli was the main celebrant and homilist of the 5 p.m. Mass March 14 in St. Joseph Church, filled to capacity, to celebrate a watershed moment: the end of yearlong 250th anniversary observations that enabled the Passaic County parish to revisit its rich missionary and pioneer history. That day, the bishop also dedicated a new lectern in honor of St. Luke, the first parish’s original namesake.

Guided by the anniversary theme, “Daring to Practice Our Faith for 250 Years,” St. Joseph’s looked back at the German immigrants, who founded the Catholic settlement that would become St. Joseph’s, upon their arrival in the U.S. in 1765 — and would become what is believed to be N.J.’s oldest faith community, according to Msgr. Raymond Kupke, diocesan archivist and pastor of St. Anthony Parish, Hawthorne. From those humble beginnings, St. Joseph has grown to a parish of 800 families, who also used this landmark anniversary to celebrate its faith-filled present and bright future. Msgr. Kupke was a concelebrant of the Mass March 14 along with Father Sigmund Peplowski, a former pastor of St. Joseph’s, who is now pastor of Sacred Heart of Jesus and St. Cecilia parishes in Rock away.

“We are proud of the strength of the mothers and fathers who founded St. Joseph’s without much equipment [or infrastructure],” said Father Steven Shadwell, St. Joseph’s pastor, about the anniversary, which opened with a Mass by Bishop Serratelli last March. “Today, there is still a strength of spirit and great love at St. Joseph’s. The people are so easy to minister to. They see this as their parish, not just a church that they go to. They are heirs to a great history and they intend to propel it forward,” he said.

Today, parishioners “dare to live their faith” through St. Joseph’s broad spectrum of spiritual Ministries, including religious education for young people and the popular Generations of Faith program, which provides faith formation across generations. On Sundays, children, who attend the 10:30 a.m. Mass are encouraged to leave the worship space during the Liturgy of the Word for some age-appropriate religious instruction and return to their families for the Liturgy of the Eucharist, said Father Shadwell.

St. Joseph’s parishioners also bring their faith out into the community through many social ministries, including its food pantry, and many outreaches to the poor and the homebound, the pastor said.

Over the last year, St. Joseph’s celebrated the anniversary through a broad range of activities. These included the publication of a cookbook, a pictorial calendar and reminiscences by parishioners in the bulletin; a Christmas concert; a parish picnic; a visit to the faith community’s mother parish, St. Joseph Church, Philadelphia; the opening of a time capsule from the parish’s 225th anniversary; and historical presentations on St. Joseph’s, including one by Msgr. Kupke. Also, St. Joseph’s participated in a town “history road rally,” which encouraged participants to answer questions about local history by visiting various local sites for clues, including the parish. St. Joseph’s will continue anniversary observances with the publication of a photo directory and the burying of a new time capsule, Father Shadwell said.

St. Joseph’s long history of faith begins in 1764, when Peter Hasenclever, a German merchant, began working for an English mine in the area of Ringwood and Greenwood Lake. He invited workers from his homeland to come and settle here; their families soon followed. These families became the founders of what would become St. Joseph’s, where many of their descendants now worship, the parish history states.

In time, Jesuit Father Ferdinand Farmer, also born in Germany, was the first missionary to muster up the courage to ride by horse through forests and over trials along the Delaware River from his parish, St. Joseph, Philadelphia, to West Milford. In between Father Farmer’s twice-yearly visits, these pioneers would gather together in the homes to pray, according to the history.

“St. Joseph’s has a missionary history that is typical. Priests were few and far between, so the parishioners kept the church going by praying and teaching the faith,” Father Shadwell said.

After Father Farmer’s last visit to Macopin in 1786, no Masses were celebrated in the area for 25 years, yet the faithful continued to pray and catechize, according to the history.

The year 1829 saw the building of the first church, which was originally dedicated to St. Luke, not St. Joseph. In 1887 a larger church was built, but was burnt to the ground in 1904 in a fire, caused by an accident that involved the furnace. That church was replaced by the current structure today, which opened in 1905 and contains many relics and pieces salvaged from the second church, the parish history states.

Back in 1880, before the fire, St. Joseph Parish was considered a mission church, part of Anthony Parish, Butler, and was administered by Franciscan friars, who remained at the parish for 120 years. These friars included Father Mychal Judge, former pastor from 1979 to 1985, and chaplain of the New York City Fire Department, who died in the terrorist attacks at the World Trade Center on Sept. 1, 2001.

Over the years, St. Joseph’s also completed other buildings, including a rectory and convent, and expanded the cemetery several times. In 1956, the Sisters of Charity arrived to administer the parish school, which opened that year. In 1985, the Sisters of Charity left, ushering in the arrival of two Presentation Sisters, Sister Janet Brisky, pastoral associate, and Sister Geraldine Corio, director of faith formation, who still minister at the parish.

Other changes to St. Joseph’s included the Franciscans returning the parish to administration of the Paterson Diocese in 2003 and the closing of the school in 2006.

One active parishioner and staff member, Mary Beth Ferriola remembers arriving in West Milford with her family in 1989 and immediately starting to attend St. Joseph’s. She first joined the Moms & Tots program and got increasingly more active in the parish over the years. Also, her children were graduated from the former St. Joseph School. Today, she serves as the parish business and cemetery administrator and chaired its anniversary committee.

“The people at St. Joseph’s are down-toearth, kind and giving people. It’s a warm, welcoming atmosphere here,” Ferriola said. “The anniversary celebrations taught us that parishioners are hungry for more than weekly worship. They want more activities where they are gathered together in social settings. They [these activities] have strengthened our sense of community,” she said.

Read the full article at http://www.evergreeneditions.com/article/At+250%2C+St.+Joseph+Parish+In+West+Milford+Celebrates+Distinction+As+Oldest+Faith+Community+In+Diocese%2C+N.J./1958026/250575/article.html.

A Jubilee Of Mercy

Elise Harris

Mercy “is the best thing we can feel: it changes the world.”

On Second Anniversary, Pope Francis Declares Extraordinary Holy Year Of ‘God’s Forgiveness

ROME Pope Francis announced an extraordinary Jubilee to start at the end of the year, which will be dedicated to a theme close to the pontiff’s heart: mercy.

“Dear brothers and sisters, I have thought about how the Church can make clear its mission of being a witness of mercy,” the pope told those at his penitential liturgy in St. Peter’s Basilica on March 13, which also marked the two-year anniversary of his election as pontiff. “It’s a journey that starts with a spiritual conversion. For this reason I have decided to declare an Extraordinary Jubilee that has the mercy of God at its center. It will be a Holy Year of Mercy.”

The biblical passage for the Holy Year’s theme is from Luke Chapter 6 verse 36, in which Jesus tells his disciples, “Be merciful as your Father is merciful.”

“I am convinced that the whole Church will be able to find in this Jubilee the joy of rediscovering and making fruitful the mercy of God, with which we are all called to give consolation to every man and every woman of our time,” Pope Francis said. The “Extraordinary Holy Year of Mercy, he said, “will be a moment for the entire Church to spread the word of God’s forgiveness.”

The Jubilee, also called a Holy Year, will open this year on Dec. 8 — the Solemnity of the Immaculate Conception — and will close Nov. 20, 2016 with the Solemnity of Our Lord Jesus Christ, King of the Universe.

It will also coincide with the 50th anniversary of the closing of the Second Vatican Council in 1965.

Sunday readings during Ordinary Time for the Holy Year will be taken from the Gospel of Luke, as he is often referred to as “the evangelist of mercy.” Among the wellknown parables of mercy present in Luke’s Gospel are those of the lost sheep, the lost coin and the merciful father.

The official announcement of the Jubilee will take place on Divine Mercy Sunday, the Sunday after Easter, with a public proclamation in front of the Holy Door of St. Peter’s Basilica.

Each of the four papal basilicas in Rome has a holy door, which are normally sealed shut from the inside so that they cannot be opened. The doors are only opened during Jubilee years so that pilgrims can enter through them in order to gain the plenary indulgence that is connected with the Jubilee.

The rite of the opening of the Holy Door is intended to symbolically illustrate the idea that the Church’s faithful are offered an “extraordinary path” toward salvation during the time of Jubilee.

After the Holy Door opens in St. Peter’s Basilica, those of the other three Roman basilicas, St. John Lateran, St. Paul Outside the Walls and St. Mary Major, will be opened.

In ancient Hebrew tradition, the Jubilee Year was celebrated every 50 years and was intended to restore equality among the children of Israel by providing opportunities for families who had lost their property and even their personal freedom to regain them.

It was also a year in which the wealthy were reminded that their Israelite slaves would again become their equals and regain their rights.

The Catholic tradition of practicing the Holy Year began with Pope Boniface VIII in 1300, and since 1475 an Ordinary Jubilee has been celebrated every 25 years in order to allow each generation to experience at least one during their lifetime.

However, as is the case with Pope Francis’ 2016 Holy Year of Mercy, an extraordinary Jubilee can be called for a special occasion or for an event that has a particular importance.

Until now there have only been 26 ordinary Jubilee celebrations, the last of which was the Jubilee of 2000.

The first extraordinary Jubilee was called in 16th century, and the most recent have been in 1933, when Pope Pius XI called one to celebrate 1900 years of Redemption, and in 1983 when St. John Paul II proclaimed one to honor 1950 years of Redemption.

Mercy is a theme that is dear to Francis, and is the central topic of his episcopal motto “miserando atque eligendo,” which he chose when ordained a bishop in 1992.

One translation of the motto, taken from a homily given by St. Bede on Jesus’ calling of St. Matthew, is “with eyes of mercy.”

In his first Angelus address as the Bishop of Rome, March 17, 2013, Pope Francis spoke of “Feeling mercy this word changes everything.”

Mercy, he said then, “is the best thing we can feel: it changes the world. A little mercy makes the world less cold and more just. We need to understand properly this mercy of God, this merciful Father who is so patient.”

In the English version of his first Apostolic Exhortation “Evangelii Gaudium,” the word “mercy” appears 32 times.

Read the full article at http://www.evergreeneditions.com/article/+A+Jubilee+Of+Mercy/1958034/250575/article.html.

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