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The Beacon The Beacon March 26 2015.pdf : Page 1

SUSSEX 3 AT OLQP, BIBLE STUDY FOCUSES ON EUCHARIST PASSAIC THE AWARDWINNING NEWSPAPER OF THE R.C. DIOCESE OF PATERSON, N.J. MORRIS MARCH 26, 2015 A CIES OF THE L EGION OF M ARY 12 6 The Catholic Center for Evangelization at Bayley-Ellard E VANGELIZING T HROUGH ESL Classes at Boonton parish launch ministry to Hispanics to bring them back to Church By MICHAEL WOJCIK NE WS EDIT OR DIOCESAN ARCHIVIST LEADS PARISHES ON LENTEN DAY OF REFLECTION 9 ROCKAWAY’S SACRED HEART SCHOOL CELEBRATES 50TH ANNIVERSARY 8-9 10-1 1 12-13 14-15 15 BEACON PHOTO | JOE GIGLI Y OUTH V IEWPOINT W HAT T O D O C LASSIFIEDS O BITUARIES Bishop Serratelli censes the Blessed Sacrament during Benediction, which was held at the Legion of Mary’s annual Acies in St. Mary Church in Passaic March 22. In the foreground is a statue of the Blessed Virgin Mary, flowers and the symbolic globe, the Vexilium, before which Legion of Mary members renew their consecration to Mary. For the story and more photos, please turn to page 13. ST. PAUL INSIDE THE WALLS ‘F EMININE , F AITHFUL , F EARLESS ’ 200 women pack diocesan Evangelization Center for annual women’s conference By CECILE SAN AGUSTIN REPOR TER DO NOT DELAY — TIME SENSITIVE NEWS MADISON Women of varying ages and back-grounds from parishes across the diocese came together at the diocesan Evangelization Center, St. Paul’s Inside the Walls, here March 21 for a daylong conference, “Today’s Catholic Woman: Feminine, Faithful and Fearless.” Some 200 women were in attendance for the second annual event. Deborah Savage, professor of philosophy and theology at the University of St. Thomas in St. Paul, Minn. was the keynote speaker for the event. Other speakers included Megan Murphy, a full-time wife, mother, catechist and speaker, and Clare Byrne, an occupational therapist and international aid volunteer. Keaton Douglas, a musician and parishioner of St. Thomas Parish in Sandyston, was mistress of ceremonies for the event. The day also included adoration of the Blessed Sacrament with music by Katie Keogler, small group discussions and a presentation on Blessed Miriam Theresa Demjanovich. Father Paul Manning, director of the evange-lization center, led the opening prayer and wel-comed the women by recalling growing up with six sisters and always being surrounded by women. “As we are on the verge of celebrating the Feast of the Annunciation (March 25), I like to think of it as the beginning of the incarnation. While Christmas is the revelation of God among us, it’s the Annunciation when God enters the ‘FEMININE, FAITHFUL, FEARLESS’ on 2 BOONTON Spanish-speaking immigrants, who open the doors to weekly English-as-a-Second-Language (ESL) classes at Our Lady of Mount Carmel (OLMC) Parish here, are actually stepping into a larger and ever-expanding ministry — one that gives them some important life lessons: ways to get more acclimated to U.S. language and cul-ture, building community, coming back to Mass and get more involved in the life of parish. OLMC offers ESL classes on Mondays at 7 p.m. in the Father Hinds Room of the parish — its first outreach of a growing ministry to Hispanics that now in-cludes a monthly Span -ish-language Mass, a prayer group, a Bible study and sacramental preparation. In fact, the Masses, held on the last Saturday of the month, attract about 100 church -goers and have become so popular that OLMC plans to hold them week-ly starting in June. The next Mass will be held this Saturday, March 28, for Palm Sunday starting at 7 p.m. with Father M ARGARET M AINARDI Thomas Fallone, pastor, said Margaret Mainardi, one of the ESL instructors, who also teaches Spanish at Seton Hall Prep, West Orange. “The classes are a good way for these Spanish speakers to get comfortable with English, which is not their mother tongue. Sometimes, they speak two other languages: Spanish and an indigenous language in their home countries. Most of the “This family, like many others, did not know that there was a Catholic church in Boonton until hearing about the ESL classes.” EVANGELIZING on 7

Evangelizing Through ESL

Michael Wojcik

Classes at Boonton parish launch ministry to Hispanics to bring them back to Church

BOONTON Spanish-speaking immigrants, who open the doors to weekly English-as-a-Second- Language (ESL) classes at Our Lady of Mount Carmel (OLMC) Parish here, are actually stepping into a larger and ever-expanding ministry — one that gives them some important life lessons: ways to get more acclimated to U.S. language and culture, building community, coming back to Mass and get more involved in the life of parish.

OLMC offers ESL classes on Mondays at 7p. m. in the Father Hinds Room of the parish — its first outreach of a growing ministry to Hispanics that now includes a monthly Spanish-language Mass, a prayer group, a Bible study and sacramental preparation. In fact, the Masses, held on the last Saturday of the month, attract about 100 church - goers and have become so popular that OLMC plans to hold them weekly starting in June. The next Mass will be held this Saturday, March 28, for Palm Sunday starting at 7 p.m. with Father Thomas Fallone, pastor, said Margaret Mainardi, one of the ESL instructors, who also teaches Spanish at Seton Hall Prep, West Orange.

“The classes are a good way for these Spanish speakers to get comfortable with English, which is not their mother tongue. Sometimes, they speak two other languages: Spanish and an indigenous language in their home countries. Most of the students do really well,” said Mainardi, who noted that classes begin and end with prayer. “The classes also are a way to bring our students back to Church and pull them into the parish. They all have come back to the Church. There has been good integration of the Spanish speakers into the parish. It [ESL] has become a way to evangelize,” she said.

The students — who come from around the Boonton area and originate mainly from Mexico, Peru, Colombia, El Salvador and Honduras — learn a lot, despite the occasional chaos of the ESL class. Sometimes, they have to answer questions or work together, amid the children whom mothers and fathers bring with them because they have no other childcare. To learn vocabulary, students often enjoy fun activities, such as drawing pictures that correspond with the words or playing an educational form of Bingo, Mainardi said.

“They help each other during Bingo. They are not competitive in class like Americans. They look at themselves as one big team,” said Mainardi, who also noted that hearing about that hardships her students experienced in their native countries makes her realize, “We are very fortunate and undervalue our freedom here in the U.S.”

These classes seat up to 12 students, young and old people, and teach them practical skills that they will use often. They learn how to order at a restaurant and explain to a doctor what ails them. At the end of each academic year, students receive a diploma and have a standing invitation to return for more instruction next year, said Mainardi, who teaches with another instructor, aided by some of her Seton Hall Prep students.

The ESL classes at OLMC join other such classes already offered at parishes in the diocese, among them: St. Ann and St. Peter, both in Parsippany; St. Kateri Tekakwitha, Sparta; and St. Joseph, Newton, she said.

In a short period of time, the ESL classes have become a springboard to a much more expansive outreach to Hispanics at OLMC and the Boonton area. Today, the Morris County parish also offers a prayer group dedicated to the Blessed Mother on Wednesday evenings, a Bible study in Spanish, rehearsals for a choir that sings during the Spanish-language Mass and class for preparation for the sacraments, held during the same time at the ESL classes on Mondays at 7 p.m., Mainardi said.

These outreaches at OLMC take place with the support and encouragement of diocesan Migrant Ministry. In fact, Father Raimundo Rivera, Migrant Ministry’s director, has concelebrated the Masses, which began in February, while Luis Arias, its assistant director, conducts training for liturgical ministers, such as lectors. Already, some members of this new community have received the sacraments of Baptism and first Holy Communion, Mainardi said.

“We have many success stories,” reported Mainardi, who spoke about one man, Heriberto, who came to the U.S. from Mexico alone at 16 with no English skills and started attending Mountain Lakes High School.

While in school, Heriberto worked six days a week as a farm worker and held a second job in retail. One of the Seton Hall Prep students tutored him for four years, and by the student’s senior year, the native Spanish speaker “was getting higher grades in English than his English-speaking peers,” Mainardi said.

“Heriberto went on to attend college here. His sister, Fina, studied basic literacy with us for five years. Currently her son and daughter are preparing to receive their Sacraments of Initiation at Our Lady of Mount Carmel,” she said.

In another instance, a family in Boonton who has been attending ESL class, has gotten involved in OLMC’s Bible study in Spanish and in its Spanish-language Masses and plans to enroll a child in the parish school, Mainardi said.

“This family, like many others, did not know that there was a Catholic church in Boonton until hearing about the ESL classes. Like others, they heard about the classes through word of mouth, through our visiting them and personally inviting them,” she said.

OLMC’s Hispanic outreach, in addition, continues to grow with the full support of Father Fallone, who plans to concelebrate the Spanish-language Masses regularly.

“Boonton is a special town that is diverse and embracing. The Spanish Mass is a natural outgrowth, which we offer through the blessing of the diocese,” said Father Fallone, adding that the liturgy has attracted some non-Spanish speakers. “Many people are coming back to Mass. There is such a joy around town [about the liturgies],” he said.

[Information about OLMC’s Hispanic outreach, (973) 334-1017.]

Read the full article at http://www.evergreeneditions.com/article/Evangelizing+Through+ESL/1963652/251387/article.html.

'Feminine, Faithful, Fearless'

Cecile San Agustin

200 women pack diocesan Evangelization Center for annual women’s conference

MADISON Women of varying ages and backgrounds from parishes across the diocese came together at the diocesan Evangelization Center, St. Paul’s Inside the Walls, here March 21 for a daylong conference, “Today’s Catholic Woman: Feminine, Faithful and Fearless.” Some 200 women were in attendance for the second annual event.

Deborah Savage, professor of philosophy and theology at the University of St. Thomas in St. Paul, Minn. Was the keynote speaker for the event. Other speakers included Megan Murphy, a full-time wife, mother, catechist and speaker, and Clare Byrne, an occupational therapist and international aid volunteer. Keaton Douglas, a musician and parishioner of St. Thomas Parish in Sandyston, was mistress of ceremonies for the event. The day also included adoration of the Blessed Sacrament with music by Katie Keogler, small group discussions and a presentation on Blessed Miriam Theresa Demjanovich.

Father Paul Manning, director of the evangelization center, led the opening prayer and welcomed the women by recalling growing up with six sisters and always being surrounded by women. “As we are on the verge of celebrating the Feast of the Annunciation (March 25), I like to think of it as the beginning of the incarnation. While Christmas is the revelation of God among us, it’s the Annunciation when God enters the world. Like Mary on that day, I invite you to listen to the words you hear today from God to reveal what plan he has for your lives.”

The theme of being “Feminine, Faithful and Fearless” resonated throughout the day as the three main speakers shared their personal witness to the women at the conference.

In her presentation, Savage spoke about “woman as prophet” today and the negativity associated with the word “feminism.”

“The worst thing to become is the angry women everyone fears and that’s what many think about when they hear the word feminism today,” said Savage.

She told the women they shouldn’t give up on the word “feminine” just yet and referenced St. John Paul II’s encyclical, “Evangelium Vitae.” In paragraph No. 99, it states about the role of women: “In transforming culture so that it supports life, women occupy a place, in thought and action, which is unique and decisive. It depends on them to promote a ‘new feminism’ which rejects the temptation of imitating models of male domination, in order to acknowledge and affirm the true genius of women in every aspect of the life of society, and overcome all discrimination, violence and exploitation.”

Savage talked about feminism being possibly an outdated concept, saying it often applies to women in more developed countries and it has a political side, such as the secular idea that there is a “war against women.” Savage said, “Yes, there is a war against women but who really is attacking women? Secular society or the Church? When you think about it, it is the Church that truly loves women.”

She challenged the attendees by having them reflect on women in developing nations. “Ask women in Darfur, who deal with rape, or in Syria, who are in refuge camps or in the Middle East where one pregnant woman was stoned to death,” she said.

Savage talked about women in the United States explaining that one in four women here is a victim of domestic violence. In many homes, dads are missing and a single mom is six times more likely to live in poverty.
“Sexual promiscuity was seen as a women being free and feminine, when in reality it has been a deadly vision,” said Savage.

“Our political system, often times run by men, wants us to be like them. They want women to pretend we don’t have our bodies. It’s time for us to expose this lie.”

To speak like a prophet, Savage said women are to be a messenger of God, messenger of the divine and message of truth. “The Catholic Church has been calling women to speak up,” she said. “It’s time for us to be heard loudly. Mary is the first icon as woman and as prophet.”

The conference inspired women who attended to live out their faith and understand their role as women in the Church.

Devyn Lopez, a student at Drew University here and member of the St. Paul’s Young Adults group at the Evangelization Center, said, “The conference was definitely relevant to my own life as I am on the brink of adulthood. Being in college, there has been this idea that feminism is about being a strong, angry independent woman and that’s not what it’s about. It’s about standing up and embracing who we are as women and speaking the truth.”

Also at the conference was Susan Van Blarcom, a parishioner of St. Paul’s, who is active in many women’s ministries. She attended last year’s conference and was inspired to come again bringing her sisters with her. “It’s really motivating to be here with so many women with the same values and beliefs as you. I had a choice to attend three other things and I chose to come here. I’ve learn so many different things and I appreciate St. Paul’s Inside the Walls hosting so many great programs.”

Eni Honsberger, director of Family Life at St. Paul’s, said, “We are really excited to be here doing this for a second year because the women have asked us to have it again. This is my job to get women together to feel good about who they are as women in Christ and to get closer to him as a community of believers.”

Read the full article at http://www.evergreeneditions.com/article/%27Feminine%2C+Faithful%2C+Fearless%27+/1963654/251387/article.html.

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