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The Beacon TheBeacon April 16, 2015 : Page 1

SUSSEX 5 S ETON ASS O C I A TE S M A RK 25TH A NNIVER SA RY PASSAIC THE A W A RDWINNING NEW S P A PER OF THE R. C . DIO C E S E OF P A TER S ON, N.J. MORRIS APRIL 16, 2015 ‘F AITH , J OY , F AMILY ’ 12 2 4 The Catholic Center for Evangelization at Bayley-Ellard BI S HOP A DMINI S TER S C ONFIRM A TION TO TEEN S A T P AS TOR A L VI S IT TO HIGHL A ND L A KE S P A RI S H S EMIN A RI A N S ERVE S AS DE AC ON A T POPE’ S E AS TER M ASS Religious educators need to evangelize while they catechize, says USCCB official at Diocesan Catechetical Conference By MICHAEL WOJCIK NE WS EDIT OR 6-7 10-1 1 12 14-15 15 DO NOT DELAY — TIME SENSITIVE NEWS Y OUTH V IEWPOINT W HAT T O D O C LASSIFIEDS O BITUARIES CLIFTON Both inside and outside the classroom, reli-gious educators, along with all baptized Catholics, should be engaged in catechizing — teaching their students and other people the specifics of the faith — while also con-tinuing to evangelize — giv-ing them a reason to believe in Jesus and inviting them into a relationship with him. More than 300 parish di-rectors of religious educa -tion, catechists and other ministers of religious forma-tion took away that message and other insights about reli -gious education from Peter Murphy, D.Min., executive director of the Secretariat of Evangelization and Cate -chesis for the U.S. Confer -ence of Catholic Bishops (USCCB), who was the key -note speaker at the 2015 Diocesan Catechetical Con -ference. The conference, which had as its theme, “Faith, Joy, Family,” was held at the John Paul II Pastoral Center here April 11. The diocesan Office of Catechetics sponsored the all-day event, which featured two talks by Murphy. His pre-sentations focused on how religious educators and all Catholics need to practice both pre-evangelizing — cul-tivating relationships with people by extending a warm welcome and engaging them in conversation — and then evangelizing — proclaiming the Gospel and inviting them to get to know Jesus. “We [catechists] often think that our students have been evangelized before they enter the classroom,” said FAITH, JOY, FAMILY At the 2015 diocesan Catechetical Conference April 11, which had as its BEACON PHOTO | JOE GIGLI theme, “Faith, Joy, Family,” are Bishop Serratelli and Society of Our Lady of the Most Holy Trinity Father Derek Anderson, director of the diocesan Office of Catechesis and pastor of St. Mary Parish, Dover, with keynote speaker Peter Murphy, executive director of the Secretariat of Evangelization and Catechesis for the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops and his family, Katie, his wife; Felicity, his daughter; and Andrew, Joshua and Caleb, his sons. Murphy, who lamented that many children today do not receive religious instruction at home or attend Mass regularly with their families. “We need to pre-evangelize and evan-gelize so that people care [about the faith]. If not, the message will get lost, planted on rocky or thorny soil. So while catechists are busy teaching all the required ma-terial for class, they also should keep evangelizing,” he said. CONTINUED on 8 FROM THE VATICAN Pope Francis: ‘Mercy is very foundation of the Church’s life’ Jubilee Year of Mercy to start Dec. 8 By ANN SCHNEIBLE CNA / E W TN NE WS VATICAN CITY Pope Francis officially proclaimed the upcoming Jubilee Year of Mercy by reminding the faithful that mercy cannot be separated from the life and ministry of the Church. “Mercy is the very foundation of the Church’s life,” Pope Francis wrote in the official declaration, released April 11. “All of her pastoral activity should be caught up in the tenderness she makes present to believers; nothing in her preaching and in her witness to the world can be lacking in mercy. The Church’s very credibility is seen in how she shows merciful and compassionate love.” “Wherever the Church is present, the mercy of the Father must be evident,” he said. Pope Francis released the Bull of Indiction of the Extraordinary Ju bilee Year of Mercy, on Satur day, moments before presiding over Vespers in St. Peter’s Basilica for the vigil of Divine Mercy Sunday. The title of the bull is “Miseri cordiae Vultus” — or, “The Face of Mercy.” The pope first announced the Year of Mercy on March 13, the second anniversary of his pon-tifical election, during a Lenten penitential liturgy in St. Peter’s Basilica. The Jubilee, also known as a Holy Year, will open this year on Dec. 8 — the Solemnity of the Immaculate Conception. That feast, during which the Church celebrates that Mary was conceived without Original Sin, “recalls God’s action from the very beginning of the history of mankind,” the pope wrote. “When faced with the gravity of (Adam and Eve’s) sin, God responds with the fullness of mer-cy,” he said. “Mercy will always be greater than any sin, and no one can place limits on the love of God who is ever ready to forgive.” Each of the four papal basilicas in Rome has a holy door, which is normally sealed shut from the inside so that it cannot be opened. The doors are only opened during Jubilee years so that pil-grims can enter through them in order to gain POPE on 13

‘Faith, Joy, Family’

Michael Wojcik

Religious educators need to evangelize while they catechize, says USCCB official at Diocesan Catechetical Conference

CLIFTON Both inside and outside the classroom, religious educators, along with all baptized Catholics, should be engaged in catechizing — teaching their students and other people the specifics of the faith — while also continuing to evangelize — giving them a reason to believe in Jesus and inviting them into a relationship with him.

More than 300 parish directors of religious education, catechists and other ministers of religious formation took away that message and other insights about religious education from Peter Murphy, D.Min., executive director of the Secretariat of Evangelization and Cate chesis for the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops (USCCB), who was the key - note speaker at the 2015 Diocesan Catechetical Conference. The conference, which had as its theme, “Faith, Joy, Family,” was held at the John Paul II Pastoral Center here April 11.

The diocesan Office of Catechetics sponsored the all-day event, which featured two talks by Murphy. His presentations focused on how religious educators and all Catholics need to practice both pre-evangelizing — cultivating relationships with people by extending a warm welcome and engaging them in conversation — and then evangelizing — proclaiming the Gospel and inviting them to get to know Jesus.

“We [catechists] often think that our students have been evangelized before they enter the classroom,” said Murphy, who lamented that many children today do not receive religious instruction at home or attend Mass regularly with their families. “We need to pre-evangelize and evangelize so that people care [about the faith]. If not, the message will get lost, planted on rocky or thorny soil. So while catechists are busy teaching all the required material for class, they also should keep evangelizing,” he said.

Guided by the theme, “How can we use our catechetical programs to build relationships with families and create opportunities for faith?” the conference also featured “break out” sessions after Murphy’s talks. During them, religious educators from the diocese and beyond gave participants suggestions about applying Murphy’s lessons in their own ministries and lives. Between the talks and sessions, an ensemble from Fiat Ventures played contemporary Christian music to place people into a state of prayer and reflection.

“This is a beautiful day made just for us — to pray, learn and share. This day is to thank you catechists for your service and to give you all encouragement and inspiration,” said SOLT Father Derek Anderson, director of the diocesan Office of Catechesis and pastor of St. Mary Parish, Dover, who also thanked Bishop Serratelli; Father Paul Manning, executive director of St. Paul Inside the Walls: the Diocesan Center for Evangelization at Bayley-Ellard, Madison, and the diocesan vicar for evangelization; a special steering committee; St. Paul’s staff; and a legion of volunteers for making the conference possible.

Attending the Catechetical Conference were Bishop Serratelli, Father Manning, Father Anderson and Father Hernan Arias. The bishop was the main celebrant and homilist at a closing Mass, concelebrated by the other three priests, and delivered an introductory address. In it, he proclaimed hope for catechists because recent popes have emphasized the importance of catechesis, but also listed the following challenges that society places in the way of religious education:

• A mindset, fostered by technology, that espouses, “In with the new and out with the old.” This makes it difficult for catechists to pass on the lasting values of the Church.

• A mentality, fostered by science, which accepts only empirical evidence. This makes no room for the spiritual, transcendent or eternal.

• A belief in self-sufficiency that rejects the need for God and the idea that life is meaningless without him.

• A creeping relativism that provides no reference for moral behavior.

• A focus on freedom — the tolerance of all behaviors, so long as they do not harm others. This has ushered in the redefinition of marriage and an acceptance of idea that people can change genders at will.

Catholics should evangelize to a society hostile to the faith and traditional values — which includes articulating the difficult truths that Jesus taught — with the strong “fidelity to the Gospel” of the early disciples, Bishop Serratelli said. He also suggested that catechetical programs require students to memorize vocabulary words related to faith, as well as prayers and the Apostles’ Creed.

“Without knowledge, a deeper understanding is not possible,” Bishop Serratelli said. “We need to give our young people the words to articulate the faith. This can lead to a personal relationship with Jesus, who is the Way, the Truth and the Life,” he said.

In his talks, Murphy offered a model for pre-evangelization: Jesus on the road to Emmaus. Christ builds a relationship with men on the road, asking them questions and listening to them, instead of chastising them for not recognizing him. It is only when Jesus breaks bread with them that they feel inspired to go to Jerusalem to evangelize, he said.

Today, we have opportunities everywhere to pre-evangelize people — from the supermarket to the sidelines of a child’s soccer game. We need to be able to articulate how has Jesus changed our lives — a compelling witness that can change the lives of other people, said Murphy in his talks that included references to Scripture; “Evangelii Gaudim,” the apostolic exhortation of Pope Francis; and USCCB documents.

“If we do not proclaim the life, death and Resurrection of Christ, the catechism has no meaning. The Gospel resonates with our experience, pain and concerns. Only Jesus can offer hope,” said Murphy, adding that we need to invite people to a personal relationship with Jesus. “Experiencing the Lord’s love and mercy will compel us to share the Gospel with others. We should live out the faith in joy. It’s not just knowing ‘stuff’ [in catechism class], but living as Christ,” he said.

In between Murphy’s two talks, Cindy Costello, a high-school catechist at St. Thomas the Apostle Parish, Sandyston, presented one of the “break out” sessions. Her talk for fifth- to eighth-grade religious educators reinforced Murphy’s idea that, in order to evangelize, catechists must become re-evangelized themselves. Costello suggested that participants seek to encounter Jesus through heart-to-heart prayer with him; a rich liturgical life, enjoying the beauty of the Mass; a “custody of the heart,” paying attention to everything that is going on with them and trying to do everything with Jesus’ help; and a devotion to Mary, “helping people love Jesus with his mother’s heart,” she said.

One participant, Theresa Kimball, a fifth — and ninth-grade catechist and youth minister, attended the conference with other ministers from her parish, Our Lady of Fatima, Highland Lakes.

“It was a great day. We learned just how important evangelization is. In the workshops, we learned how to engage people, especially those, who have fallen away from the faith, without being preachy,” Kimball said. “Dr. Murphy shared his experience and showed us the importance of reaching out to people, praying and building relationships with people to help us evangelize.”

Read the full article at http://www.evergreeneditions.com/article/%E2%80%98Faith%2C+Joy%2C+Family%E2%80%99/1981715/254131/article.html.

Pope Francis: ‘Mercy Is Very Foundation Of The Church’s Life’

Ann Schneible

Jubilee Year of Mercy to start Dec. 8

VATICAN CITY Pope Francis officially proclaimed the upcoming Jubilee Year of Mercy by reminding the faithful that mercy cannot be separated from the life and ministry of the Church.

“Mercy is the very foundation of the Church’s life,” Pope Francis wrote in the official declaration, released April 11. “All of her pastoral activity should be caught up in the tenderness she makes present to believers; nothing in her preaching and in her witness to the world can be lacking in mercy. The Church’s very credibility is seen in how she shows merciful and compassionate love.”

“Wherever the Church is present, the mercy of the Father must be evident,” he said.

Pope Francis released the Bull of Indiction of the Extraordinary Ju bilee Year of Mercy, on Satur day, moments before presiding over Vespers in St. Peter’s Basilica for the vigil of Divine Mercy Sunday.

The title of the bull is “Miseri cordiae Vultus” — or, “The Face of Mercy.”

The pope first announced the Year of Mercy on March 13, the second anniversary of his pontifical election, during a Lenten penitential liturgy in St. Peter’s Basilica. The Jubilee, also known as a Holy Year, will open this year on Dec. 8 — the Solemnity of the Immaculate Conception.

That feast, during which the Church celebrates that Mary was conceived without Original Sin, “recalls God’s action from the very beginning of the history of mankind,” the pope wrote.

“When faced with the gravity of (Adam and Eve’s) sin, God responds with the fullness of mercy,” he said. “Mercy will always be greater than any sin, and no one can place limits on the love of God who is ever ready to forgive.”

Each of the four papal basilicas in Rome has a holy door, which is normally sealed shut from the inside so that it cannot be opened. The doors are only opened during Jubilee years so that pilgrims can enter through them in order to gain The plenary indulgence that is connected with the Jubilee.

When it is opened, the pope writes, “the Holy Door will become a Door of Mercy through which anyone who enters will experience the love of God who consoles, pardons, and instills hope.”

One of the characteristics of this Jubilee will be that it not be limited to Rome, but will be extended to churches — and even some sanctuaries — around the world “as a visible sign of the Church’s universal communion.”

The Holy Year will conclude Nov. 20, 2016 with the Solemnity of Our Lord Jesus Christ, King of the Universe.

“On that day, as we seal the Holy Door, we shall be filled, above all, with a sense of gratitude and thanksgiving to the Most Holy Trinity for having granted us an extraordinary time of grace,” the Pope wrote.

“How much I desire that the year to come will be steeped in mercy, so that we can go out to every man and woman, bringing the goodness and tenderness of God!”

Pope Francis also observed the significance that the Jubilee year’s opening will coincide with the 50th anniversary of the closing of the Second Vatican Council, which ushered the Church into “a new phase of her history.”

“The Council Fathers strongly perceived, as a true breath of the Holy Spirit, a need to talk about God to men and women of their time in a more accessible way,” he said. “The Church sensed a responsibility to be a living sign of the Father’s love in the world.”

Pope Francis reminded the faithful that the capacity for mercy begins with learning to listen to God’s Word, which requires “rediscovering the value of silence” in order “to contemplate God’s mercy and adopt it as our lifestyle.”

“This Holy Year will bring to the fore the richness of Jesus’ mission echoed in the words of the prophet: to bring a word and gesture of consolation to the poor, to proclaim liberty to those bound by new forms of slavery in modern society, to restore sight to those who can see no more because they are caught up in themselves, to restore dignity to all those from whom it has been robbed.”

Pope Francis stressed the importance of the Sacrament of Reconciliation during the Jubilee for Mercy. “Let us place the Sacrament of Reconciliation at the center once more in such a way that it will enable people to touch the grandeur of God’s mercy with their own hands,” he said.

Finally, Pope Francis called on the faithful to turn to Mary during the Jubilee for Mercy, on whose feast the Holy Year will be commenced.

“No one has penetrated the profound mystery of the incarnation like Mary,” he said.

“In this Jubilee Year, let us allow God to surprise us. He never tires of throwing open the doors of his heart and repeats that he loves us and wants to share his love with us. The Church feels the urgent need to proclaim God’s mercy. Her life is authentic and credible only when she becomes a convincing herald of mercy.”

Read the full article at http://www.evergreeneditions.com/article/Pope+Francis%3A+%E2%80%98Mercy+Is+Very+Foundation+Of+The+Church%E2%80%99s+Life%E2%80%99/1981723/254131/article.html.

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