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The Beacon The Beacon May 7 2015.pdf : Page 1

7 DIO C E S E L A UN C HE S PILOT PROGR A M FOR IN S PE C TION OF BUILDING S SUSSEX PASSAIC THE A W A RDWINNING NEW S P A PER OF THE R. C . DIO C E S E OF P A TER S ON, N.J. MORRIS MAY 7, 2015 12 The Catholic Center for Evangelization at Bayley-Ellard 5 8 ASS UMPTION C OLLEGE TO HOLD C OMMEN C EMENT EXER C I S E S M A Y 9 DIO C E SA N BLUE M ASS HONOR S F A LLEN OFFI C ER S ‘Love Is Our Mission’ prepares Sparta parishioners for event with Pope Francis By MICHAEL WOJCIK NE WS EDIT OR W ORLD M EETING OF F AMILIES BEACON PHOTO | RICH GIGLI G OD B LESS AND G ODSPEED 9 10-11 12 13 14-15 DO NOT DELAY — TIME SENSITIVE NEWS Y OUTH V IEWPOINT W HAT T O D O O BITUARIES C LASSIFIEDS Msgr. Mark Giordani, rector of the Cathedral of St. John the Baptist, Paterson, and founder of the Christian Riders Motorcycle Club, celebrated the 46th annual Motorcycle Mass May 3 outside the cathedral on the corner of Main and Grand Streets. Riders from all over the diocese and beyond attended the Mass at which there was a blessing of the bikers and their motorcycles. Pictured is Msgr. Giordani blessing bikers with holy water as they ride by him. ST. PAUL INSIDE THE WALLS Author tells how to feed the hungry, give drink to the thirsty, still keep your day job By MICHAEL WOJCIK NE WS EDIT OR MADISON The prayers of the rosary ring from a loudspeaker in the back of a truck that inches down a busy street in New York City one day during this past Lent. Behind the vehicle, a pro-cession of 300 Catholics, prays along with the an-nouncer. Among the faithful is Kerry Weber, man-aging editor of America magazine, who takes up an invitation to head to the front and carry the cross that leads the group — a moment that gives her a perfect metaphor for spiritual reflection. “That opportunity was the challenge: how do I live out my faith in public?” said Weber, a young adult, who visited St. Paul Inside the Walls: the Diocesan Center for Evangelization at Bayley-Ellard here April 15, to participate in the final session of a series of public conversations about faith, life and work, called “Speaking of Faith.” Actually, Weber has been living out her faith in the public arena since she was young, especially in the area of social justice. As a little girl, she would make regular trips to a soup kitchen in her part of northwestern Massachusetts with her mother and two siblings. There, they not only would feed clients, but also eat with them to be in solidarity with the poor they were serving, said Weber, who is lay associate with the Sisters of Mercy Mid-Atlantic Community. “I had faithful parents. My father was ‘Mr. Fix It’ at our parish. It was all part of evangelization that made all of us kids want to be part of the ‘SPEAKING OF FAITH’ on 4 SPARTA Parishioners at Our Lady of the Lake (OLL) here have been getting more acquainted with the importance of making known the joy of realizing God’s plan for building healthy mar-riages and faith-filled Catholic families — es-pecially to a secular so-ciety that continues to move further away from the family and tradition-al values. Tonight, OLL presents the third session of “Love Is Our Mission,” a six-part series to help prepare parishioners for the World Meeting of Fam ilies in Philadelphia, one of by Pope Francis’ stops dur-ing his first visit to the U.S. in September. The parishioners are explor-ing the 10 major themes to be addressed at the world meeting. Guided by the document, “Love Is Our Mis sion: The Fam -ily Fully Alive, a Prepara -tory Cat e chesis for the F ATHER G RZEGORZ World Meeting of Fam -G OLBA ilies,” the gatherings at the Sussex County parish will be held on Thurs days through May 7, from 7-8:30 p.m. in Cassidy Hall. “Today, the traditional family is in crisis. The culture has become a detriment to the families. There is no sense of commitment. The Church is seen as not allowing people to have fun or ex-press themselves,” said Kathryn Faherty, an OLL catechist, who listed some of societal trends that have been chipping away at the family, including divorce, out-of-wedlock births, pornography and “Parents pray with their children. They know that they can pray to change their families and the world, but first, they must change themselves.” MEETING OF FAMILIES on 2

World Meeting Of Families

Michael Wojcik

‘Love Is Our Mission’ prepares Sparta parishioners for event with Pope Francis

SPARTA Parishioners at Our Lady of the Lake (OLL) here have been getting more acquainted with the importance of making known the joy of realizing God’s plan for building healthy marriages and faith-filled Catholic families — especially to a secular society that continues to move further away from the family and traditional values.

Tonight, OLL presents the third session of “Love Is Our Mission,” a six-part series to help prepare parishioners for the World Meeting of Fam ilies in Philadelphia, one of by Pope Francis’ stops during his first visit to the U. S. in September. The parishioners are exploring the 10 major themes to be addressed at the world meeting. Guided by the document, “Love Is Our Mis sion: The Fam - ily Fully Alive, a Prepara - tory Cat e chesis for the World Meeting of Fam - ilies,” the gatherings at the Sussex County parish will be held on Thurs days through May 7, from 7-8:30 p.m. in Cassidy Hall.

“Today, the traditional family is in crisis. The culture has become a detriment to the families. There is no sense of commitment. The Church is seen as not allowing people to have fun or express themselves,” said Kathryn Faherty, an OLL catechist, who listed some of societal trends that have been chipping away at the family, including divorce, out-of-wedlock births, pornography and “same-sex” marriage. “God knows us and what we need to bring us joy. If you give yourself totally to the other [your spouse], you can be happy. Today, we need to re-catechize the Church about marriage,” she said.

In addition to the series, OLL has been praying for the success of the world meeting during holy hours, held on last Sundays in the church, after the noon Mass, where they also listen to prayerful reflections on the chapters of the catechetical document. The next holy hour will be held May 31. The parish also distributed cards that bear the Prayer for the World Meeting of Families, Faherty said.

OLL’s series started on April 23 where Faherty, also a former teacher at Pope John XXIII Regional High School, Sparta, covered the chapter, “Created for Joy,” about the fact that God created us to share his joy. That night, Michael Grace, also a parish catechist, explored the chapter, “Our Mission of Love,” which looked at the fact that Catholics have a purpose: to receive God’s love and to show his love to others. These sessions include prayer; catechesis, including Scripture readings; and open discussions on the topic, said Faherty.

“Both presenters made clear God’s love for us. When we love someone [either the Lord or our spouses], we want to do for them,” said Joanna Mattos, OLL’s secretary, who has been attending the series. “There have been lively discussions and husbands have been attending them with their wives.”

Presented by a team of parishioners, the series continued on April 30 with “The Meaning of Human Sexuality” that explored the idea that sexuality has the power to procreate and shares in the dignity of being created in God’s image. Tonight’s session explores “Two Become One,” about the fact that marriage is a uniquely intimate relationship that calls a man and woman to love each other in the manner of God’s covenant, and “Creating a Future,” about marriage being meant to welcome new life.

The second half of the “Love Is Our Mission” series will continue on the following dates:

• May 14 with “All Love Bears Fruit,” about the fact that even the priesthood, religious life and the celibate lay vocation enrich and are enriched by witness to the married state, and “Light in a Dark World,” about the idea that, at its best, the family serves as a school of love, justice, compassion, forgiveness, mutual patience and humility in a world darkened by selfishness and conflict;

• May 21 with “A Home for the Wounded Heart,” about the fact that the Christian family and networks of families should be sources of mercy, safety, friendship and support for those struggling with issues of same-sex attraction and divorce, and “Mother, Teacher, Family,” about the reality that, even when the Church’s people and leaders sin, we still need the Church’s wisdom, Sacraments, support and proclamation of the truth; and

• May 28 with “Choosing Life,” about our mission of love that requires courage and fortitude, and “Where Do We Go from Here?,” a concluding reflection.

Coordinating the “Love Is Our Mission” sessions and the holy hours have been Elizabeth Heldak, religious education director, who introduced the series to the parish, after receiving information about the program from the diocese, and Father Grzegorz Golba, parochial vicar. OLL expects that the world meeting will bring greater attention to these issues of marriage and family, so the parish anticipates presenting the “Love Is Our Mission” series again in the fall. Developed by the Archdiocese of Philadelphia, the catechetical materials in preparation for the meeting are available online at www.worldmeeting2015.org, Mattos said.

“We are called to acknowledge how beautiful, true and good it is to start a family, to be a family today… We are called to make known God’s magnificent plan for the family… as we accompany them amidst so many difficulties,” Pope Francis said ahead of the September meeting.

Father Golba has been leading the holy hours and has attended “Love Is Our Mission” sessions, which he described as “good in spiritually preparing people.”

“There has been a good response to the holy hours. Parents pray with their children. They know that they can pray to change their families and the world, but first, they must change themselves,” Father Golba said. “The ‘Love Is Our Mission’ series is excellent and has good speakers, who give the people fresh knowledge of God and the faith.”

[Information: (973) 729-6107.]

Read the full article at http://www.evergreeneditions.com/article/World+Meeting+Of+Families/2001146/257810/article.html.

Author Tells How To Feed The Hungry, Give Drink To The Thirsty, Still Keep Your Day Job

Michael Wojcik

MADISON The prayers of the rosary ring from a loudspeaker in the back of a truck that inches down a busy street in New York City one day during this past Lent. Behind the vehicle, a procession of 300 Catholics, prays along with the announcer. Among the faithful is Kerry Weber, managing editor of America magazine, who takes up an invitation to head to the front and carry the cross that leads the group — a moment that gives her a perfect metaphor for spiritual reflection.

“That opportunity was the challenge: how do I live out my faith in public?” said Weber, a young adult, who visited St. Paul Inside the Walls: the Diocesan Center for Evangelization at Bayley- Ellard here April 15, to participate in the final session of a series of public conversations about faith, life and work, called “Speaking of Faith.”

Actually, Weber has been living out her faith in the public arena since she was young, especially in the area of social justice. As a little girl, she would make regular trips to a soup kitchen in her part of northwestern Massachusetts with her mother and two siblings. There, they not only would feed clients, but also eat with them to be in solidarity with the poor they were serving, said Weber, who is lay associate with the Sisters of Mercy Mid-Atlantic Community.

“I had faithful parents. My father was ‘Mr. Fix It’ at our parish. It was all part of evangelization that made all of us kids want to be part of the faith,” said Weber, whose parents’ strong example has inspired her to seek out opportunities for spirituality and serve to others as a Catholic young adult — even challenging herself during Lent to perform the seven Corporal Works of Mercy in the 40 days.

Weber wrote about her experiences of meeting that daunting, yet rewarding, challenge in a book, “Mercy in the City: How to Feed the Hungry, Give Drink to the Thirsty, Visit the Imprisoned and Still Keep Your Day Job,” published by Loyola Press. Weber, who earned a master’s degree from the Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism, spoke about her award-winning book, Catholic upbringing, faith and work at America, a national Catholic journal, published by the Jesuits.

A frequent co-host of a weekly radio program on SiriusXM 129, The Catholic Channel, Weber engaged in a lively conversation with Allan Wright, the center’s academic dean, before an enthusiastic audience of about 100 Catholics. Wright was substituting for Father Paul Manning, St. Paul’s executive director and diocesan vicar for evangelization, who was away.

Wright acknowledged that Weber had been raised solidly in the faith, but asked her, “When did you become a conscious Catholic?” She answered, explaining that it was when she served as a full-time volunteer in the Mercy Volunteer Corps (MVC), after earning her bachelor’s degree from Providence College, R.I. She worked as a special-education teacher in St. Michael’s, Ariz., on the Navajo reservation as part of MVC, which emphasizes “social justice, spirituality and simple living,” said Weber, who said she incorporates those principles into her daily life.

“With MVC, I learned a lot about living in community with people who had all different spiritualities,” said Weber, who admitted to Wright that her image of God changed during her MVC service, while cleaning up the vomit of a Navajo girl one day. “I knelt on the floor. The girl was eye-to-eye with me. She put her hand on my shoulder, in a sense, saying to me, ‘Do what you are supposed to do.’ That is exactly what God is calling all of us to do — serve others,” she said.

Later, Weber said that she challenged herself to perform the seven Corporal Works of Mercy to create her own “lifestyle of mercy.” She felt confused about how she should help the homeless she passes on her way to her Manhattan office, but ultimately realized, “A lack of action can, in itself, be injustice.”

“We need to live out the Corporal Works of Mercy in the way the Gospels call us to do — by meeting the hunger — both physical and spiritual — of people,” said Weber, whose Lenten challenge directed her to undertake outreaches, such as visiting San Quentin State Prison in California, digging graves with a gravedigger and volunteering at a parish-run homeless shelter for men in New York City.

Also inspiring Weber has been her 12 years of Catholic school education, which emphasized “faith as part of everyday life,” and Pope Francis — a Jesuit — “who has energized the Church,” by presenting an “image of humble service by living out that service.” Her appearance at St. Paul’s follows a visit last May by her brother, Matthew, author of “Fearing the Stigmata,” who spoke about evangelizing and faith as part of the center’s “Friday Night Light” series.

In a question-and-answer session, Trevor Jones, who ministers to young adults at St. Paul’s, picked up on Weber’s notion that engaging in service should inspire prayer and engaging in prayer should inspire service. “It’s easy to get young adults to do service, but it’s tough to get them to come to opportunities for prayer,” Jones said.

“Service can open up that conversation. On the way coming back from a service project, you can ask them about prayer, but it can’t be a trick to talk about spirituality. They will see through that,” Weber said.

Afterward, Wright told The Beacon that he took away from his conversation with Weber the idea that “living the faith, especially the Corporal Works of Mercy, must be intentional or they get lost in the mix of our often hectic lives.”

“Kerry made it her ‘Lenten practice’ and ‘mercy’ has overflowed into the fabric of who she is, which is a good challenge for my family and me,” Wright said.

Read the full article at http://www.evergreeneditions.com/article/Author+Tells+How+To+Feed+The+Hungry%2C+Give+Drink+To+The+Thirsty%2C+Still+Keep+Your+Day+Job/2001147/257810/article.html.

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