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The Beacon The Beacon May 14 2015 : Page 1

4 NET C ONG P A RI S HIONER S WE A R OR A NGE IN S OLID A RITY WITH C HRI S TI A N M A RTYR S SUSSEX PASSAIC THE A W A RDWINNING NEW S P A PER OF THE R. C . DIO C E S E OF P A TER S ON, N.J. MORRIS MAY 14, 2015 L AST S TEP B EFORE C ALL TO P RIESTHOOD 12 9 The Catholic Center for Evangelization at Bayley-Ellard Bishop ordains 10 men as deacons By MICHAEL WOJCIK NE WS EDIT OR BI S HOP DEDI CA TE S NEW A LT A R A T TOTOW A P A RI S H FR A N C I SCA N S I S TER S HONOR FOUNDER WHO I S NOW A SA INT 10-11 12 13 14-15 15 16 V IEWPOINT W HAT T O D O O BITUARIES C LASSIFIEDS Y OUTH DO NOT DELAY — TIME SENSITIVE NEWS CLIFTON Bishop Serratelli ordained 10 diocesan seminarians to the tran-sitional diaconate May 8 in St. Philip the Apostle Church here, which brought the men a step closer to the priesthood. During the Celebration of Or -din ation to the Order of Deacon, steeped in the rich traditions of the early Church, Bishop Serratelli or-dained the following men as tran-sitional deacons: Rev. Mr. Dominik Bakowski, Rev. Mr. Marcin Bradtke, Rev. Mr. Przemyslaw Karol Gawlik, Rev. Mr. Krzysztof Piotr Liwarski, Rev. Mr. Michal Jan Szwarc, Rev. Mr. Slawomir Tomaszewski, Rev. Mr. Artur Zaba and Rev. Mr. Dawid Zajecki, all from Poland, and Rev. Mr. Jeider Smith Barraza Jimenez and Rev. Mr. Duberney Villamizar Gonzalez, both from Colombia. He was the main celebrant and hom -ilist of the Mass with numerous priests as concelebrants before a standing-room-only throng in St. Philip’s. All 10 men received the Holy Spirit, during the rite with Bishop Serratelli, who anticipates ordaining the seminarians to priesthood next CLOSER TO PRIESTHOOD Bishop Serratelli ordained 10 diocesan seminarians as transitional deacons on May 8 in St. Philip BEACON PHOTO | JOE GIGLI the Apostle Church, Clifton, bringing the deacons a step closer to the priesthood. The bishop poses with the deacons after ordination: (top, from left) Przemyslaw Karol Gawlik, Krzysztof Piotr Liwarski, Michal Jan Szwarc, Artur Zaba, Dominik Bakowski and Slawomir Tomaszewski and (bottom, from left) Marcin Bradtke, Jeider Smith Barraza Jimenez, Duberney Villamizar Gonzalez and Dawid Zajecki. year were prayers, hymns and read-ings in English during the Cele -bration of Ordination to the Order of Deacon. Near the beginning of the ordi-nation, Father Hubert Jurjewicz, diocesan vocations director, asked the bishop to ordain the candidates for the diaconate. Then, the bishop asked about their worthiness. Father Jurjewicz replied, “After inquiry among the Christian people and up-on the recommendation of those re-sponsible, I testify that they have been found worthy.” After accepting them, the bishop asked for the approval of the assembly, which it enthusiastically granted with its applause. Bishop Serratelli listed a deacon’s responsibilities: to proclaim the Gospel, to dispense the Eucharist, to give instruction in holy doctrine, to prepare the Holy Sacrifice and to preside over Baptisms, marriages, funerals and public prayer. A deacon also carries out acts of charity in ‘LAST STEP’ on 8 Quadruple amputee is ‘instrument of grace and redemptive force’ Strong faith guides Sparta parishioner to share story with others By MICHAEL WOJCIK NE WS EDIT OR STANHOPE Richard Fritzky never thought that one day he would end up on the other side of the hospital gurney, facing death, suffering un-bearable pain and ultimately learn-ing to live with a host of debilitating disabilities — including the ampu-tation of all four of his limbs. Fritzky still remembers when he was 14 and he was the one pushing stretchers and wheelchairs. At that time, his “saintly” aunt, Mary Varick, enlisted him to join her “Simons and Veronicas,” who cared for a group of severely disabled people on pil-grimage to the great Catholic shrines of Quebec, Canada. For Fritzky, now 65, there would be many more such pilgrimages to religious sites in Canada, New England, New York, and New Jersey. Five decades later, Fritzky finds himself navigating what many peo-ple might consider a cruel fate. Now, he is the one, confined to a wheel-chair, after fighting a fierce battle with Neisseria Meningitis — acute inflammation of the protective mem-branes that cover the brain and spinal cord — that left him a quadruple amputee. This long jour-ney started in 2006 and inevitably led Fritzky to deal with 36 major surgeries, end-stage renal disease, colon cancer, bouts with death and excruciating pain. Yet, he is filled with a joy that most people could never understand and with a strong belief that God has blessed him with the “gift of suffering.” “The recovery has been long and agonizing. But I was never mad at God. I was in a coma for four months and my brain should have been fried and my heart should have given out. At times, I had a 107-de-AMPUTEE on 2

Last Step Before Call To Priesthood

Michael Wojcik

Bishop ordains 10 men as deacons

CLIFTON Bishop Serratelli ordained 10 diocesan seminarians to the transitional diaconate May 8 in St. Philip the Apostle Church here, which brought the men a step closer to the priesthood.

During the Celebration of Or - din ation to the Order of Deacon, steeped in the rich traditions of the early Church, Bishop Serratelli ordained the following men as transitional deacons: Rev. Mr. Dominik Bakowski, Rev. Mr. Marcin Bradtke, Rev. Mr. Przemyslaw Karol Gawlik, Rev. Mr. Krzysztof Piotr Liwarski, Rev. Mr. Michal Jan Szwarc, Rev. Mr. Slawomir Tomaszewski, Rev. Mr. Artur Zaba and Rev. Mr. Dawid Zajecki, all from Poland, and Rev. Mr. Jeider Smith Barraza Jimenez and Rev. Mr. Duberney Villamizar Gonzalez, both from Colombia. He was the main celebrant and hom - ilist of the Mass with numerous priests as concelebrants before a standing-room-only throng in St. Philip’s.

All 10 men received the Holy Spirit, during the rite with Bishop Serratelli, who anticipates ordaining the seminarians to priesthood next year were prayers, hymns and readings in English during the Cele - bration of Ordination to the Order of Deacon.

Near the beginning of the ordination, Father Hubert Jurjewicz, diocesan vocations director, asked the bishop to ordain the candidates for the diaconate. Then, the bishop asked about their worthiness. Father Jurjewicz replied, “After inquiry among the Christian people and upon the recommendation of those responsible, I testify that they have been found worthy.” After accepting them, the bishop asked for the approval of the assembly, which it enthusiastically granted with its applause.

Bishop Serratelli listed a deacon’s responsibilities: to proclaim the Gospel, to dispense the Eucharist, to give instruction in holy doctrine, to prepare the Holy Sacrifice and to preside over Baptisms, marriages, funerals and public prayer. A deacon also carries out acts of charity in name of bishop or pastor, he said.

Then, during the ordination, each candidate stood before the Bishop Serratelli, who questioned him on the Office of Deacon. Each candidate declared his intention to be ordained to the diaconate and to fulfill its duties. They each knelt before the bishop and placed his hands between his, promising obedience and respect to him and to his successors.

After, the candidates prostrated themselves before the altar, symbolizing their humility and dependence on God’s grace. The bishop invited the assembly to join in praying the Litany of the Saints to ask God to bless the candidates.

In keeping with the practice of the Apostolic Church, Bishop Serratelli laid his hands on the head of each candidate to signify the conferral of the Holy Spirit and the commission to service. He asked God to dedicate these men to the service of the Church and to renew the spirit of holiness within them.

“Send forth upon them, Lord, we pray, the Holy Spirit, that they may be strengthened by the gift for your grace for the faithful carrying out of the work of the ministry,” the bishop said. “Look with favor on these servants of yours, who minister at your holy altar and whom we humbly dedicate to the Office of Deacon.”

Then, invited priests helped the deacons put on their stoles and then a dalmatics, before Bishop Serratelli handed the Book of the Gospels to the candidates. He told them, “Receive the Gospel of Christ, whose herald you have become. Believe what you read, teach what you believe and practice what you teach.” After, the bishop and other deacons gave the newly ordained the fraternal sign of peace, welcoming them into the Order of Deacon.

In his closing remarks, Bishop Serratelli offered a prayer for the newly ordained transitional deacons and thanked those who supported the new deacons.

A broad congregation of well-wishers, including family, friends, priests and religious of the diocese, members of parishes where the seminarians have served and other supporters, attended the ordination as a sign of encouragement to the new transitional deacons.

Read the full article at http://www.evergreeneditions.com/article/Last+Step+Before+Call+To+Priesthood/2006147/258523/article.html.

Quadruple Amputee Is ‘Instrument Of Grace And Redemptive Force’

Michael Wojcik

Strong faith guides Sparta parishioner to share story with others

STANHOPE Richard Fritzky never thought that one day he would end up on the other side of the hospital gurney, facing death, suffering unbearable pain and ultimately learning to live with a host of debilitating disabilities — including the amputation of all four of his limbs.

Fritzky still remembers when he was 14 and he was the one pushing stretchers and wheelchairs. At that time, his “saintly” aunt, Mary Varick, enlisted him to join her “Simons and Veronicas,” who cared for a group of severely disabled people on pilgrimage to the great Catholic shrines of Quebec, Canada. For Fritzky, now 65, there would be many more such pilgrimages to religious sites in Canada, New England, New York, and New Jersey.

Five decades later, Fritzky finds himself navigating what many people might consider a cruel fate. Now, he is the one, confined to a wheelchair, after fighting a fierce battle with Neisseria Meningitis — acute inflammation of the protective membranes that cover the brain and spinal cord — that left him a quadruple amputee. This long journey started in 2006 and inevitably led Fritzky to deal with 36 major surgeries, end-stage renal disease, colon cancer, bouts with death and excruciating pain.

Yet, he is filled with a joy that most people could never understand and with a strong belief that God has blessed him with the “gift of suffering.”

“The recovery has been long and agonizing. But I was never mad at God. I was in a coma for four months and my brain should have been fried and my heart should have given out. At times, I had a 107-degree fever and my heart raced like a marathon runner in the 26th mile,” said Fritzky, who recently authored a book about his aunt. “A Pilgrim’s Song: Mary Varick and Her Theology of Suffering” pays tribute to his faith-filled aunt, who insisted that God’s greatest gifts included pain, denial, suffering and sacrifice.

“I feel blessed,” he said. “Neisseria Meningitis kills 90 percent of its victims. Out of all this suffering, madness and darkness, I am improbably still here. The prayers of many and the grace of God alone saw me through.”

In fact, Fritzky — who shared his experiences at a retreat/reflection at St. Jude Parish, Budd Lake, May 2 — looks back on assisting with his aunt’s pilgrimages as “on-the-job training.”

“Those pilgrimages prepared me for the life I live now,” said Fritzky, who remembers the many pilgrimages of deep faith and love that he made. He recalled Jeanette, a blind woman, who was confined to a stretcher and only able to move her head. “She was the most powerful woman on Earth, since Joan of Arc. She would say, ‘I still have such great work to do.’ Jeanette would listen each hour for the bells of Holy Rosary Church in Jersey City to peal and pray for specific things, such a vocations or a neighbor who was sick,” he said.

Jeanette’s prayerful example — along with the wise words of a quadriplegic friend — inspired Fritzky to let go of those feelings of powerlessness and to give into an even stronger sense of mission that fills his life with great joy and purpose.

“I realized that I could become an instrument of grace and a redemptive force myself, doing my part to take on the sufferings of the world and especially of those, who are suffering and asking, ‘Why the hell is this happening to me?’ ” said Fritzky of Stan hope, who is a parishioner at St. Kateri Tekak witha, Sparta, and draws strength from his Catholic faith.

Fritzky said that he also draws strength from the faith and love of Varick who taught him about grace in suffering. She was blessed with a loving husband and four children, when bone cancer threatened her life — a ravaging disease that was miraculously cured during a visit to Sainte-Anne-de-Beaupre on July 21, 1951. For the remaining 37 years of her life, Varick “went on the relentless sojourn of an unabashed pilgrim, determined to bring others, especially her disabled, to ‘God’s inner circle,’ ” Fritzky said.

“Aunt Mary made all these suffering people feel better. She told them that they had time to pray because of their gift of disability. She said that they had the precious opportunity to help Jesus carry the Cross for redemption’s sake,” said Fritzky. She also established several ministries, such as the Our Lady of Fatima First Saturday Club, which brings disabled people together for Mass, the rosary and a meal. “Mary also brought them together for companionship, joy and hope and to share in the great grace and goodness of God.”

Fritzky — a father of 12 and grandfather of 12 — fondly remembers feeding, washing, bathing and talking to the pilgrims. Leading the pilgrimages was Varick, who had befriended Mother Teresa and had two brothers who were priests of the Arch - diocese of Newark: Fathers Francis and John Cassidy.

These pilgrimages prepared Fritzky for his own severe illnesses and disabilities, which included amputation of portions of both legs and most of the fingers on both hands. He also suffered with painful bedsores, a kidney transplant that was followed by a pulmonary embolism and other challenges. Soon, he will undergo surgery — his 37th — for a double hernia, Fritzky said.

Today, all of these seemingly debilitating disabilities have not slowed down Fritzky, who spins around on the main level of his house in his special wheelchair. He has written several books — including “What Must Needs Come: a Legacy of Gettysburg.” now in production — and he teaches three online courses at Fairleigh Dickinson University, typing away on his computer with the nub of one of his fingers. He calls “A Pilgrim’s Song” a “labor of love” and expressed hope that the book could “breathe new life” into Our Lady of Fatima First Saturday Club and the annual pilgrimage.

One of the retreatants at St. Jude’s was Mike Sabella, the parish’s evangelization coordinator, who called Fritzky’s presentation “a powerful witness.”

“It’s an incredible story. Rich should have died,” Sabella said. “Even with everything he went through, he is positive and happy. He demonstrates a level of gratitude to God that most other people never do. Rich feels that he is blessed to be able to bring this message to other people,” he said.

[“A Pilgrim’s Song” is available at wwwtatepublishing.com/bookstore/book. The link to the book’s website is http://richardfritzky.tateauthor.com/. It will be available at Amazon.com on May 26. Fritzky is available for speaking engagements. Call him at (973) 446-0789.]

Read the full article at http://www.evergreeneditions.com/article/Quadruple+Amputee+Is+%E2%80%98Instrument+Of+Grace+And+Redemptive+Force%E2%80%99/2006162/258523/article.html.

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