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The Beacon The Beacon June 25 2015 : Page 1

SUSSEX 5 LONGTIME DIO C E SA N EMPLOYEE TO RETIRE PASSAIC THE A W A RDWINNING NEW S P A PER OF THE R. C . DIO C E S E OF P A TER S ON, N.J. MORRIS JUNE 25, 2015 ‘L AUDATO S I ’ 10 6 6 The Catholic Center for Evangelization at Bayley-Ellard NEWLYORD A INED PRIE S T FULFILL S PROMI S E TO C ELEBR A TE M ASS A T F A TIM A S HRINE BI S HOP VI S IT S W A YNE P A RI S H FOR M ASS ON F A THER’ S D A Y 4 8-9 10 26 27-29 Parishes praise Pope Francis’ latest encyclical By CECILE SAN AGUSTIN REPOR TER Y OUTH V IEWPOINT W HAT T O D O O BITUARIES C LASSIFIEDS CLIFTON In his encyclical, “Laudato Si,” Pope Francis presented every person in the world with a spiritual perspective on caring for God’s creation by giving all a wake-up call on addressing the state of the planet. The Pope, whose chose his name in tribute to St. Francis of Assisi, the patron saint of the environment, titled his encyclical after a quotation from his namesake’s “Canticle of the Sun” — “Laudato Si” translates to “Praise Be.” In “Laudato Si,” Pope Francis writes, “We have to hear both the cry of the earth and the cry of the poor” — much like the message St. Francis preached to his followers in the 13th century. Throughout the Dio -cese, Catholics have been reflecting on the pope’s encyclical since its release June 18. Many parishes with ministries dedicated to the care of creation were grateful the pope released this timely and important message. Father Peter Filipkowski, pastor of St. Catherine of Siena Parish, Mountain Lakes, ad-dressed the encyclical in the parish bulletin last week. “This is a good time to address this moral issue. Pope Francis has frequently linked care for the environment to care for the poor, since it is the poor who suffer most from rising sea levels, from air pollution, from water pollution and from destruction of the rain forests,” the pastor wrote. “On a more basic level, we need to relearn re-spect for creation as the gift of God entrusted to our stewardship but not ours to destroy,” he wrote. “Fostering a sense of wonder and awe at God’s handiwork provides a base for caring for creation, not out of guilt but out of joy and gratitude.” At St. Mary Parish in Pompton Lakes, Jackie Schramm, director of social justice ministry, said, BEACON PHOTO | JOE GIGLI Pope blasts abortion, population control, takes stance on environmental issues, pg. 2 H ATS O FF ! At Morris Catholic High School in Denville, members of the Class of 2015 celebrate their graduation with the traditional tossing of their graduation caps into the air following commencement June 4. Nearly 700 students were graduated from the three diocesan high schools and four private high schools in the Diocese of Paterson. Compete coverage of Catholic school graduations begins on page 11. ST. PAUL INSIDE THE WALLS DO NOT DELAY — TIME SENSITIVE NEWS ‘The Eucharist is synonymous with peace:’ Priest reaffirms importance of 12-Step’s spiritual dimension By MICHAEL WOJCIK NE WS EDIT OR ENCYCLICAL on 25 MADISON People who struggle with drug or al-cohol dependency can find comfort and hope in a simple, yet powerful spiritual message that Pope Emeritus Benedict XVI directed to the universal Church, not only to addicts: “the Eucharist is syn-onymous with peace.” That’s one of many Christ-centered and af-firming teachings that Dominican Father Emmerich Vogt imparted to the more than 50 people who attended his three-day mission about the spiritual component of the 12-step recovery program. The event was held at St. Paul Inside the Walls: the Diocesan Center for Evangelization here, from Friday to Sunday, June 19-21. Participants who came to hear Father Vogt in-cluded those who are participating in recovery programs, friends and family members of addicts, and priests, religious and lay people, who minister to them. “We are sinners, but God takes us into his arms and feeds us with his bread. The Eucharist is the central mystery of our faith, of salvation and of peace and is a mystery to be lived. We need to share our experiences of strength, hope and love in a loving way,” said Father Vogt, during his presentations on “Is Serenity a Necessary Part of Christian Life?” and “The Path to Serenity” on Saturday. Father Vogt delivered two other talks: “The Catholic Connections in the 12-Step Movement” on Friday and “How Do the 12-Steps Relate to Catholic Biblical Spirituality?” on Sunday, which was followed by Mass. The priest, who now lives at St. Dominic Priory in San Francisco, comes from a family with some members who have bat-tled alcohol and drug addiction. 12 STEPS on 7

‘Laudato Si’

Cecile San Agustin

Parishes praise Pope Francis’ latest encyclical

CLIFTON In his encyclical, “Laudato Si,” Pope Francis presented every person in the world with a spiritual perspective on caring for God’s creation by giving all a wake-up call on addressing the state of the planet.

The Pope, whose chose his name in tribute to St. Francis of Assisi, the patron saint of the environment, titled his encyclical after a quotation from his namesake’s “Canticle of the Sun” — “Laudato Si” translates to “Praise Be.”

In “Laudato Si,” Pope Francis writes, “We have to hear both the cry of the earth and the cry of the poor” — much like the message St. Francis preached to his followers in the 13th century.

Throughout the Dio - cese, Catholics have been reflecting on the pope’s encyclical since its release June 18. Many parishes with ministries dedicated to the care of creation were grateful the pope released this timely and important message.

Father Peter Filipkowski, pastor of St. Catherine of Siena Parish, Mountain Lakes, addressed the encyclical in the parish bulletin last week. “This is a good time to address this moral issue. Pope Francis has frequently linked care for the environment to care for the poor, since it is the poor who suffer most from rising sea levels, from air pollution, from water pollution and from destruction of the rain forests,” the pastor wrote.

“On a more basic level, we need to relearn respect for creation as the gift of God entrusted to our stewardship but not ours to destroy,” he wrote. “Fostering a sense of wonder and awe at God’s handiwork provides a base for caring for creation, not out of guilt but out of joy and gratitude.”

At St. Mary Parish in Pompton Lakes, Jackie Schramm, director of social justice ministry, said, “I feel ecstatic about the pope’s encyclical. I believe this is the issue of the moment and I have tremendous gratitude for the pope for taking on this issue. He’s approaching it in a way that everyone needs to hear — the reality is what is happening to our planet and the poor.”

The ministry at St. Mary’s tackles many environmental issues. For the past few years, members have been focusing on climate change, genetically modified organisms or GMOs in food production and fracking or hydraulic fracturing. The parish group has been educating members of the parish and other people in the community through a Care for Creation Fair, a Lenten program, and many community advocacy gatherings such as the Climate Change March that took place last September in New York City.

Schramm felt the the Pope released his message now to prepare for his visit to the United Nations this September and in preparation for world leaders who will meet in Paris in December for the United Nations Climate Change Conference.

“There’s a sign on my desk that states, ‘This Pope gives me hope.’ I look forward to everything he says,” she said.

As Catholics start to focus on ways they can act on the pope’s encyclical, Schramm said a simple way is by signing an online petition found on www.ourvoices.net. The petition urges global leaders to act on climate change. Also at St. Mary’s the parish will participate in the website’s Global Climate Chorus at 1 p.m. on Sunday, June 28. During this time, prayers will be said around the world by all faith communities regarding climate change.

To get the message across about Pope Francis’ encyclical, Phyllis Philips, youth minister at St. Kateri Tekawitha Parish in Sparta, posted online a video by Jesuit Father James Martin sharing 10 points about the Pope’s encyclical. Next September, she plans to get Confirmation candidates at St. Kateri involved with the Pope’s message. “One of the things I love about my Catholic faith is our rich social teaching. ‘Laudato Si’ adds to that teaching by reminding us of our responsibility to care for ‘our common home.’ This encyclical is hugely readable. Pope Francis urges a conversion of heart that includes learning to live with less,” she said.

“He calls us to a mindfulness in the way we consume and use resources that considers the dignity of the poor who often suffer from our choices,” Phillips said.

Read the full article at http://www.evergreeneditions.com/article/%E2%80%98Laudato+Si%E2%80%99/2041012/263750/article.html.

‘The Eucharist Is Synonymous With Peace:’ Priest Reaffirms Importance Of 12-Step’s Spiritual Dimension

Michael Wojcik

MADISON People who struggle with drug or alcohol dependency can find comfort and hope in a simple, yet powerful spiritual message that Pope Emeritus Benedict XVI directed to the universal Church, not only to addicts: “the Eucharist is synonymous with peace.”

That’s one of many Christ-centered and affirming teachings that Dominican Father Emmerich Vogt imparted to the more than 50 people who attended his three-day mission about the spiritual component of the 12-step recovery program. The event was held at St. Paul Inside the Walls: the Diocesan Center for Evangelization here, from Friday to Sunday, June 19-21. Participants who came to hear Father Vogt included those who are participating in recovery programs, friends and family members of addicts, and priests, religious and lay people, who minister to them.

“We are sinners, but God takes us into his arms and feeds us with his bread. The Eucharist is the central mystery of our faith, of salvation and of peace and is a mystery to be lived. We need to share our experiences of strength, hope and love in a loving way,” said Father Vogt, during his presentations on “Is Serenity a Necessary Part of Christian Life?” and “The Path to Serenity” on Saturday.

Father Vogt delivered two other talks: “The Catholic Connections in the 12-Step Movement” on Friday and “How Do the 12-Steps Relate to Catholic Biblical Spirituality?” on Sunday, which was followed by Mass. The priest, who now lives at St. Dominic Priory in San Francisco, comes from a family with some members who have battled alcohol and drug addiction.

On Saturday, Father Vogt emphasized the deepest wish that addicts hold, when praying the famous Serenity Prayer: to be at peace with themselves. We need to understand that there are many circumstances in life that we cannot control, while there are many circumstances that we can. Ultimately, we need to rely on God, the priest said.

“The devil throws the past in people’s faces to make their lives seem hopeless. We can’t control the past. We need to surrender our inability to change the past. Also, we can’t control the future. We can’t have any expectations of what might happen. We need to leave the outcome to God,” said Father Vogt.

A strong faith gives addicts the needed “spiritual and moral antibodies” to help fight their addictions that help them say “no” to drugs and alcohol and build up their own virtue, said Father Vogt. “What we do spirituality affects us psychologically and physically,” said Father Vogt, who noted that the world continues to be fraught with insanity — with horrific crimes like mass murders — because we all have been born with a “lack of felt grace” and “sin has wounded the integrity of our nature.”

“God created us for love and happiness. Only grace and love will save us. St. Paul said that love is the only thing that never passes away. It continues on into eternity,” the priest said.

On Sunday, Father Vogt spoke about the spirituality of each of the 12 Steps, noting that the last step invites participants to evangelize. Having experienced a spiritual awakening, they should carry the message of the 12 Step principles to people, who still suffer, and practice them in all their affairs.

“This means that, if we have been spiritual transformed, people will begin to observe it in our relationships and in our community lives,” Father Vogt said. “We must remember that this growth is a process with one of the growth directions being toward God. The gauge for successful daily living involves honesty, purity, unselfishness and love,” he said.

The three-day mission dovetailed with St. Paul’s weekly “Scripture and the 12 Steps: Recovery with Christ” program, moderated by Father Paul Manning, executive director and diocesan vicar for evangelization, and MaryTheresa Conca, administrative assistant. Sessions — which are only meant to supplement regular 12 Step programs — take place on Sundays, 9:30-10:30 a.m. One participant in the Sunday sessions, who attended the mission, was Dianne Roberts of St. Patrick Parish, Chatham. “When I’m working the program, I feel the Holy Spirit working through me. The most important relationship in my life is the one between God and me and I keep working on that relationship. I’m accountable to life my life to honor God and do his holy will,” Roberts said.

Allan Wright, St. Paul’s academic dean, noted that all Catholics, not only addicts, could do well in applying the principles of the 12 Steps in their own lives. “Who hasn’t admitted that they are powerless and turned their lives over to God? Who hasn’t taken inventory of their lives, admitted their sins and asked for God’s forgiveness?” said Wright, who noted that those spiritual realities are imbedded in the first few 12 Step principles. “We can all spiritually connect with the 12 Steps — whether we call them 12 Steps or not — which can impact our Catholic witness.”

Read the full article at http://www.evergreeneditions.com/article/%E2%80%98The+Eucharist+Is+Synonymous+With+Peace%3A%E2%80%99+Priest+Reaffirms+Importance+Of+12-Step%E2%80%99s+Spiritual+Dimension/2041014/263750/article.html.

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