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The Beacon The Beacon July 2 2015 : Page 1

3 BI S HOP I SS UE S LETTER ON S UPREME C OURT DE C I S ION SUSSEX PASSAIC THE A W A RDWINNING NEW S P A PER OF THE R. C . DIO C E S E OF P A TER S ON, N.J. MORRIS JULY 2, 2015 8 The Catholic Center for Evangelization at Bayley-Ellard Casa Guadalupe blessed with vocations as several young women enter religious orders By CECILE SAN AGUSTIN REPOR TER M EETING THE B ISHOP 6 CA RMELITE S I S TER, OLDE S T OF 10 IN F A MILY, M A KE S FIN A L VOW S CLIFTON When Casa Guadalupe 9 S ERR A C LUB HO S T S A NNU A L M ASS A ND BEEF S TE A K DINNER 5 8 10-1 1 12-1 6 Y OUTH W HAT T O D O V IEWPOINT C LASSIFIEDS opened in 2011 with Bishop Serratelli’s blessing, it provided a one-of-a-kind residence for young women. The concept of Casa Guadalupe is simple — a house of discernment for women in their 20s to 40s offering community life, prayer and the opportunity to serve the Church while the women work or study full-time. The home opened with eight res-idents and since that time, many of the women have found their calling with several entering religious life. In the last 10 months alone, four women at Casa Guadalupe have joined different religious orders and another became a missionary serv-ing in Mexico. Now, five more women are getting ready to move into Casa Guadalupe to begin their discernment period next month. “There are many houses of dis-cernment for men to reflect on their vocations, but when Casa Guadalupe opened we were one of the few for women,” said Holly Wright, director of Casa Guadalupe. “Discernment is fundamental to re-alizing you a have vocation and we have been really blessed. There’s a real need for houses of discernment for women and we are very grateful to Bishop Serratelli for allowing us “These vocations are clearly a manifestation of God’s mercy ... God always calls. Casa Guadalupe is a place where we are learning how to live that call.” F RANCISCAN F ATHER OF THE R ENEWAL A GUSTINO T ORRES to have this home.” For 23-year-old Rocio Perez, who entered the Monastery of Our Lady of Mount Carmel and St. Joseph in Brooklyn, in June, living at Casa Guadalupe allowed her to fully dis-cover her vocation. “Being surround-BLESSED WITH VOCATIONS on 4 BEACON PHOTO | JOE GIGLI Following Mass at St. Elizabeth Ann Seton Parish in Flanders June 28, Bishop Serratelli greets the Bileci family. For more photos from the Bishop’s pastoral visit to Flanders, turn to page 2. DO NOT DELAY — TIME SENSITIVE NEWS ST. PAUL INSIDE THE WALLS E QUIPO E VANGELIZACION H ISPANO By MICHAEL WOJCIK NE WS EDIT OR Diocese expands outreach to Hispanics by founding new ministry listening to the needs of the pastors in their outreach to Hispanics. Equipo Evangelizacion Hispano also will coordinate the diocesan Hispanic Commission; train leaders for parish ministry in liturgical min-istries, adult formation, marriage preparation, evangelization, catech-esis, family and youth ministry; and serve as liaison to diocesan Migrant Ministry, Catholic Charities, Catholic Charismatic Ministry and to the Office of Cultural Diversity. Last year, the ministry began to crystallize, thanks to the enthusiastic support of Bishop Serratelli. The newly formed Hispanic Evangelization Team has been developing the new outreach. “There is a renewed effort to reach out to the Spanish-speaking community that has been embraced by Bishop Serratelli. We are giving this our 100 percent attention,” said Ivannia Vega-McTighe, associate ac-ademic dean of St. Paul Inside the Walls: the Catholic Center for Evangelization at Bayley-Ellard here, Hispanic Leadership Team member and a Spanish speaker. “We want to serve the Hispanic community by welcoming them, helping them and being in solidarity with them,” she said. The team hopes to inspire Office of Evangelization staff to “think in an integrated way” between the English-and Spanish-speaking com-ST. PAUL INSIDE THE WALLS on 6 MADISON The Paterson Diocese has begun to revitalize its outreach to the local Spanish-speaking commu-nity, in part, by developing a new ministry, Equipo Evangelizacion Hispano, which seeks to direct, man-age and coordinate outreach efforts by the Office of Evangelization and to formulate and implement a co-hesive pastoral plan for Hispanic ministry in the Diocese. But first, the ministry plans to spend the next year, traveling to local parishes and

Casa Guadalupe Blessed With Vocations As Several Young Women Enter Religious Orders

Cecile San Agustin

CLIFTON When Casa Guadalupe opened in 2011 with Bishop Serratelli’s blessing, it provided a one-of-a-kind residence for young women. The concept of Casa Guadalupe is simple — a house of discernment for women in their 20s to 40s offering community life, prayer and the opportunity to serve the Church while the women work or study full-time.

The home opened with eight residents and since that time, many of the women have found their calling with several entering religious life. In the last 10 months alone, four women at Casa Guadalupe have joined different religious orders and another became a missionary serving in Mexico. Now, five more women are getting ready to move into Casa Guadalupe to begin their discernment period next month.

“There are many houses of discernment for men to reflect on their vocations, but when Casa Guadalupe opened we were one of the few for women,” said Holly Wright, director of Casa Guadalupe. “Discernment is fundamental to realizing you a have vocation and we have been really blessed. There’s a real need for houses of discernment for women and we are very grateful to Bishop Serratelli for allowing us to have this home.”

For 23-year-old Rocio Perez, who entered the Monastery of Our Lady of Mount Carmel and St. Joseph in Brooklyn, in June, living at Casa Guadalupe allowed her to fully discover her vocation. “Being surrounded by this great group of women has taught me so much,” she said. “Just being with other women, who have experienced the same feelings as me gave me so much encouragement. We lived together, we prayed together, we cried together and we laughed together.”

The house also gave Perez a great transition to learning about how to adapt to community life and a rhythm about what daily religious life would be like. But the idea of community life and religious life was far from Perez’s mind when she was growing up, even though during her enitre life Perez was told she was going to be a religious sister.

Perez, who was born in the Dominican Republic and grew up in Perth Amboy, said, “When I was young, I never wanted to be a nun. I would say, ‘anything but that.’”

She went to Catholic school and she would witness the work of the Felician Sisters at her elementary school. “I would see them and I would think, ‘Is God speaking to me?’ But it was something I was running from and I didn’t see it as a beautiful calling.”

In high school, Perez began thinking more about her vocation in life. She started attending retreats and the question about her vocation started to mean something to her. During her first years at Felician College, she began mission work and then the question became, “What community should she serve?”

That question was answered during a pilgrimage with college students to Rome and Assisi. The thought of cloistered life entered her mind during prayer. As a cloistered nun, she would live a life of prayer and meditation in a monastery with little physical contact with the outside world. She said her reaction was, “God, absolutely not. You are asking way too much.”

She prayed about it and at first, she thought about the superficial things. “I wouldn’t have my iPod anymore or travel,” she laughed. “But then, He began to make it clear to me. I began to love silence and realized how necessary it is. Within the next couple of weeks, I realized I had been preparing my whole life for this. People need prayers all over the world, sometimes more than preaching.”

At Casa Guadalupe, Perez isn’t the first resident to enter a cloistered order. Marysia Czaplinski entered in 2012 and is now Carmelite Sister Isha. Judith Guzman also entered earlier this year. Both women are now at the Monastery of the Blessed Virgin Mary of Mount Carmel in Morristown. The other two women who decided to enter religious life are Julissa Espinal, currently with the Sisters of Life in the Bronx N.Y., and Claudia Salazar, who entered the Dominican Sisters of the Most Holy Trinity in Lima, Peru.

As part of living at Casa Guadalupe, the women commit to live there for one year and are allowed to renew for another year, if they need to continue the discernment process. They are involved in several apostolates, which include a women’s discernment group; mission trips across the country and overseas; and Corazon Puro, a chastity ministry.

The women can often be found attending daily Mass at St. Philip Church nearby. They are all Associates of St. Michael Friary in Paterson and partner with the Franciscan Friars of the Renewal serving there. Franciscan Father of the Renewal Agustino Torres is spiritual director to the women and helped start the Clifton residence, which is located in a home that formerly served as the diocesan Office for Clergy Personnel and Vocations on Valley Road next to the Diocesan Center and the St. Pope John Paul Center.

With the many vocations coming from Casa Guadalupe, Father Agustino thinks this is a blessing for the diocese as the world celebrates the Year of Consecrated Life. “When I approached Bishop Serratelli about the idea of Casa Guadalupe he was so incredibly receptive, but I do not think anyone could have expected this response,” the priest said. “These vocations are clearly a manifestation of God’s mercy especially since I can vouch that these are not flippant decisions these woman are taking. Every vocation is a mystery. It is a process of discovery. Learning to listen to God means a whole bunch of things including teaching ourselves to listen through prayer, community, service and spiritual direction. God always calls. Casa Guadalupe is a place where we are learning how to live that call.”

Read the full article at http://www.evergreeneditions.com/article/Casa+Guadalupe+Blessed+With+Vocations+As+Several+Young+Women+Enter+Religious+Orders/2047145/264486/article.html.

Equipo Evangelizacion Hispano

Michael Wojcik

Diocese expands outreach to Hispanics by founding new ministry

MADISON The Paterson Diocese has begun to revitalize its outreach to the local Spanish-speaking community, in part, by developing a new ministry, Equipo Evangelizacion Hispano, which seeks to direct, manage and coordinate outreach efforts by the Office of Evangelization and to formulate and implement a cohesive pastoral plan for Hispanic ministry in the Diocese. But first, the ministry plans to spend the next year, traveling to local parishes and listening to the needs of the pastors in their outreach to Hispanics.

Equipo Evangelizacion Hispano also will coordinate the diocesan Hispanic Commission; train leaders for parish ministry in liturgical ministries, adult formation, marriage preparation, evangelization, catechesis, family and youth ministry; and serve as liaison to diocesan Migrant Ministry, Catholic Charities, Catholic Charismatic Ministry and to the Office of Cultural Diversity. Last year, the ministry began to crystallize, thanks to the enthusiastic support of Bishop Serratelli. The newly formed Hispanic Evangelization Team has been developing the new outreach.

“There is a renewed effort to reach out to the Spanish-speaking community that has been embraced by Bishop Serratelli. We are giving this our 100 percent attention,” said Ivannia Vega-McTighe, associate academic dean of St. Paul Inside the Walls: the Catholic Center for Evangelization at Bayley-Ellard here, Hispanic Leadership Team member and a Spanish speaker. “We want to serve the Hispanic community by welcoming them, helping them and being in solidarity with them,” she said.

The team hopes to inspire Office of Evangelization staff to “think in an integrated way” between the English- and Spanish-speaking communities. This new approach will develop in the office “advocates for Spanish-speaking communities in the Diocese,” said Father Paul Manning, St. Paul’s executive director of St. Paul Inside the Walls: the Diocesan Center for Evangelization at Bayley-Ellard, Madison, diocesan vicar for evangelization and a team member.

Team members took to first step in developing Equipo Evangelizacion Hispano by getting to know each other. Members also include: Marla Martinez, Evangelization Office administrative assistant; Deacon Guido Pedraza of the Cathedral of St. John the Baptist, Paterson, who has worked there for the past 10 years; and Eric Munoz, a former missionary with the Fellowship of Catholic University Students (FOCUS). He joined the team July 1, Father Manning said.

Deacon Pedraza, who has served as evangelization coordinator and has worked with small Christian communities at St. John’s, will travel around the diocese to identify current programs, opportunities and needs, Father Manning said.

“We want to spend a year listening and find out the needs in the parishes. We want to find out how we can coordinate and support them better,” Father Manning said.

In September, Equipo Evangelizacion Hispano will reconstitute the Spanish Commission. The team also is hoping to coordinate efforts with Father Raimundo Rivera, Migrant Ministry director, and Father Enrique Corona, pastor of St. Agnes and St. Michael the Archangel parishes, both in Paterson, and director of Diocesan Catholic Charismatic Center, Paterson, Father Manning said.

Already, Equipo Evangelizacion Hispano has started to put together an events calendar that includes an open house on Oct. 24; a day to talk about Catholic apologetics on April 2, 2016; the training of religious educators and pre-Cana leaders; the hosting of a visit from the pilgrim image of Our Lady of Guadalupe; and a formation program in Spanish, Vega-McTighe said.

In the future, the team plans to review resources on Hispanic ministry by the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops, work to form a diocesan pastoral plan for multicultural ministries and possibly make arraignments to attend Encuentro, a national gathering of Hispanic Catholics that takes place every three years, Vega-McTighe said.

“We want our department [the Office of Evangelization] to have sensitivity to the needs of Hispanic people,” Vega- McTighe said.

[Equipo Evangelizacion Hispano can be found on FaceBook at St. Paul Inside the Walls in Espanol with plans for a website in Spanish. Information: Deacon Guido Pedraza at gpedraza@patersondiocese.org.]

Read the full article at http://www.evergreeneditions.com/article/Equipo+Evangelizacion+Hispano/2047149/264486/article.html.

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