Background Image

The Beacon The Beacon July 9 2015 : Page 1

BISHOP’S LETTER MARKS AUGUST AS MONTH OF PRAYER FOR THOSE PERSECUTED FOR THEIR FAITH SUSSEX PASSAIC THE AWARDWINNING NEWSPAPER OF THE R.C. DIOCESE OF PATERSON, N.J. 3 MORRIS JULY 9, 2015 8 The Catholic Center for Evangelization at Bayley-Ellard ‘I GNITING ’ P ARISHIONERS Ministry seeks to revitalize Flanders parish during 30th anniversary year By MICHAEL WOJCIK NE WS EDIT OR 2 EXCITEMENT BUILDS AS DETAILS OF POPE’S VISIT ARE RELEASED BEACON PHOTO | JOE GIGLI 7 BISHOP VISITS ST. JOSEPH’S REST HOME IN PATERSON 6 7 8 9-1 1 12-16 V ISIT TO V ERNON Y OUTH O BITUARIES W HAT T O D O V IEWPOINT C LASSIFIEDS Bishop Serratelli greets Robert and Aleksandra Jamiolkowski and their baby daughter, Izabella. Behind them is Denise Soto with her daughter, Adriana. All are parishioners at St. Francis De Sales Parish in the McAfee section of Vernon in Sussex County where the Bishop celebrated Mass July 5 during his pastoral visit. For more photos, see page 5. HOLY HOUR FOR FAMILIES DO NOT DELAY — TIME SENSITIVE NEWS Diocesan parishes pray for promotion, stability of traditional marriage, family By MICHAEL WOJCIK NE WS EDIT OR OGDENSBURG Several parishes around the dio-cese have responded to the increasingly intense focus on issues about marriage and family in so-ciety and the Church this year — including the fiery debate over gay “marriage” and the antici-pation of the 2015 World Meeting of Families with Pope Francis in September — by holding holy hours, Adoration of the Blessed Sacrament and Benediction to pray for the promotion and stability of traditional marriage and family and the success of the upcoming historic papal visit to Washington, New York City and Philadelphia. St. Thomas of Aquin Parish here has been holding a Holy Hour for Families on first Fridays after the 7 p.m. Mass, since May. Father John Pilipie, pastor, presides over the service, which includes Eucharistic adoration and recitation of the rosary for the intentions of “life and families.” The next two holy hours will take place Fridays, Aug. 7 and Sept. 4, the priest said. “We have been praying together for our fam-ilies, for the success of the World Meeting of Families and for a safe trip for the pope. Prayer is a powerful and praying for our families is es-sential,” said Father Pilipie, who said that he got the idea for the holy hour from Our Lady of the Lake (OLL) Parish, Sparta. That’s because OLL faithful have been praying for the success of the World Meeting of Families at holy hours held on last Sundays of the month HOLY HOUR on 4 FLANDERS This year, St. Elizabeth Ann Seton Parish here has decided to celebrate its 30th an-niversary by undertaking a major renovation — not by replacing the church steeple or refurbishing the worship space — but instead, by giving its already dynamic parishioners and staff a top-to-bottom spiritual makeover. This rural Morris County faith community — one of the youngest in the diocese — plans to mark this milestone by embarking on a major process of revitalization that looks inward — to its own rich history and legacy so far and to ways of enriching parishioners’ spiritual-ly — but also looks outward — to discover new and varied ways of spreading the Gos -pel and welcoming new people. Taking the lead in formulating these am-bitious plans has been Ignite, a new minis -try at St. Elizabeth’s, charged with doing T HE I GNITE T EAM what the name im-plies: “firing up” its parishioners about deepening their faith, getting involved in the parish, evan-gelizing the Gospel and inviting people to Church. The Ignite “team” is working to put together a series of programs and activities that will give this 1,600-family faith community its “spiritual makeover” throughout the course of its anniver-sary year. The celebration will kick off on Sunday, Sept. 20 with a noon opening Mass, said Joy Rastiello, St. Elizabeth’s communications coordi-nator and a team member. We invite each parishioner to make visible the youthful joy of love of God and unselfish love for every neighbor. IGNITING on 4

Diocesan Parishes Pray For Promotion, Stability Of Traditional Marriage, Family

Michael Wojcik

OGDENSBURG Several parishes around the diocese have responded to the increasingly intense focus on issues about marriage and family in society and the Church this year — including the fiery debate over gay “marriage” and the anticipation of the 2015 World Meeting of Families with Pope Francis in September — by holding holy hours, Adoration of the Blessed Sacrament and Benediction to pray for the promotion and stability of traditional marriage and family and the success of the upcoming historic papal visit to Washington, New York City and Philadelphia.

St. Thomas of Aquin Parish here has been holding a Holy Hour for Families on first Fridays after the 7 p.m. Mass, since May. Father John Pilipie, pastor, presides over the service, which includes Eucharistic adoration and recitation of the rosary for the intentions of “life and families.” The next two holy hours will take place Fridays, Aug. 7 and Sept. 4, the priest said.

“We have been praying together for our families, for the success of the World Meeting of Families and for a safe trip for the pope. Prayer is a powerful and praying for our families is essential,” said Father Pilipie, who said that he got the idea for the holy hour from Our Lady of the Lake (OLL) Parish, Sparta.

That’s because OLL faithful have been praying for the success of the World Meeting of Families at holy hours held on last Sundays of the month in the church after the noon Mass. Participants listen to prayerful reflections on the chapters of catechetical document, “Love Is Our Mission: The Family Fully Alive, A Preparatory Catechesis for the World Meeting of Families,” which will guide the groundbreaking meeting, during Pope Francis’ first visit to the U.S. The next holy hour will be held July 26.

OLL’s holy hours originally were part of a larger program to get the Sussex County parish’s faithful more acquainted with the importance of making known the joy of realizing God’s plan of building healthy marriages and faith-filled Catholic families — especially to a secular society that continues to move further away from religion and traditional values. On May 28, the parish finished a sixpart series, “Love Is Our Mission,” that explored topics to be covered at the meeting, including the meaning of human sexuality, according to God’s plan, and the fact that marriage is meant to welcome new life, Kathryn Faherty, an OLL catechist, told The Beacon in a story on the program in its May 7 issue. The parish has also distributed to its faithful cards that bear the Prayer for the World Meeting of Families, Faherty said.

“Today, the traditional family is in crisis. The culture has become a detriment to the families. There is no sense of commitment. The Church is seen as not allowing people to have fun or express themselves,” said Faherty, who listed some of societal trends that have been chipping away at the family, including divorce, out-of-wedlock births, pornography and same-sex “marriage,” which the U.S. Supreme Court, affirmed in a slim 5-4 vote on June 26. “God knows us and what we need to bring us joy. If you give yourself totally to the other [your spouse], you can be happy. Today, we need to recatechize the Church about marriage,” she said.

Last month, St. Patrick Parish, Chatham, held a Holy Hour and Benediction in Prayer for Marriage — part of its monthly series of services, each dedicated to a different intention, such as vocations, religious liberty, life and persecuted Christians. Father Christopher Barkhausen, parochial vicar, led the holy hour on June 21, which included an opening prayer, his reflection and recitation of the rosary interspersed with reading quotes from popes and saints about marriage. About 25 faithful attended the holy hour, which was held on Father’s Day — “a way to celebrate fathers with our Heavenly Father,” the priest said.

“During the holy hour, we were praying about the upcoming U.S. Supreme Court decision,” Father Barkhausen said. “In my reflection, I talked about the times, when the family is misunderstood — as in the cases of divorce, infidelity, contraception and abortion — and there are problems and a breakdown in the marital union and families. I talked about the importance of the family as a building block of society, which is the fruit of marriage,” he said.

[Information on the Holy Hour for Families at St. Thomas of Aquin Parish, call (973) 827-3190; the holy hour for the success of the World Meeting on Families at Our Lady of the Lake Parish, call (973) 729-6107; and for the holy hour and Benediction at St. Patrick’s, call (973) 635-0625.]

Read the full article at http://www.evergreeneditions.com/article/Diocesan+Parishes+Pray+For+Promotion%2C+Stability+Of+Traditional+Marriage%2C+Family/2052303/265109/article.html.

‘Igniting’ Parishioners

Michael Wojcik

Ministry seeks to revitalize Flanders parish during 30th anniversary year

FLANDERS This year, St. Elizabeth Ann Seton Parish here has decided to celebrate its 30th anniversary by undertaking a major renovation — not by replacing the church steeple or refurbishing the worship space — but instead, by giving its already dynamic parishioners and staff a top-to-bottom spiritual makeover.

This rural Morris County faith community — one of the youngest in the diocese — plans to mark this milestone by embarking on a major process of revitalization that looks inward — to its own rich history and legacy so far and to ways of enriching parishioners’ spiritually — but also looks outward — to discover new and varied ways of spreading the Gospel and welcoming new people.

Taking the lead in formulating these ambitious plans has been Ignite, a new minis - try at St. Elizabeth’s, charged with doing what the name implies: “firing up” its parishioners about deepening their faith, getting involved in the parish, evangelizing the Gospel and inviting people to Church. The Ignite “team” is working to put together a series of programs and activities that will give this 1,600-family faith community its “spiritual makeover” throughout the course of its anniversary year. The celebration will kick off on Sunday, Sept. 20 with a noon opening Mass, said Joy Rastiello, St. Elizabeth’s communications coordinator and a team member.

"This will be a parish renovation and revitalization,” said Father Stanley Barron, pastor of St. Elizabeth’s since 2005 and diocesan vicar for education. “We are trying to get people more involved in ministries in the parish and to address concerns about evangelization that Bishop Serratelli has raised. People here are interested in making the parish grow,” he said.

The 40-person Ignite Team has divided the “spiritual makeover” into four “pillars” — or areas of focus: prayer and worship; faith formation; service and charity; and sharing our faith with others. It has been planning programs and events to coincide with each pillar — including guest speakers, religious services and social-justice projects — that will take place throughout the anniversary year. Ignite — headed by Father Barron — will distribute flyers that explain the new ministry and list the anniversary activities on the day of the opening Mass, said Rastiello, a member of the service and charity committee.

To unify all these efforts, the team crafted a new parish mission statement that calls for the transformation of St. Elizabeth’s “through prayer, worship, service, charity and growth in knowledge of our faith, while being guided by the Holy Spirit.” Father Barron and Father Cely wrote an Ignite Prayer [see related story], which is being recited at each Mass, meeting and class. The team selected a theme song for the year, “God, Light Your World” by Chris Rice, which is being sung at Masses. Youth group member Taylor Beck even created a logo for Ignite [pictured below], Rastiello said.

The team has demonstrated its dedication to the Ignite process by committing to a busy schedule of meetings. The four pillar committees convene as often as needed, usually bi-weekly. The steering committee — which consists of leaders of the pillar committee, Father Barron and Father Hernan Cely, parochial vicar — meets twice monthly. Then, all 40 members come together once a month. The two priests conducted a retreat in March to commemorate the establishment of the team and “to pull in the Holy Spirit to guide us and to give us something inspirational,” Rastiello said.

Helping to guide some of these meetings has been Allan Wright, academic dean of St. Paul Inside the Walls: the Diocesan Center for Evangelization at Bayley-Ellard, Madison. He has been encouraging the team to “think strategically” about its efforts to help revitalize the parish and evangelize by “focusing on a narrow set of goals that it can accomplish.” Wright has visited St. Elizabeth’s twice as part of St. Paul’s ongoing outreach to parishes.

“The two priests of St. Elizabeth’s have been spearheading the effort, but it’s the 40 people of the team together, who are collaborating and searching for ways to get the parish ignited,” Wright said. “They are asking the right questions. They understand that we are to evangelize in everything we do. Bishop Serratelli says, ‘Evangelization is not one thing that the Church does, among many things, it’s the only thing it does,’ ” Wright said.

So far, the Ignite Team organized a recent garage sale, which already started to promote some of its goals ahead of the anniversary. It encouraged community building as people “came from around town to check out St. Elizabeth’s” and as it included involvement from Sacred Heart Parish, Dover and a local Methodist church, Rastiello said.

“With Ignite, we at St. Elizabeth’s want to provide a better experience for existing parishioners and encourage new members to join us,” she said.

The idea for Ignite came from Father Barron and members of the parish Administrative Board, who read, “Rebuilt: Awakening the Faithful, Reaching the Lost and Making Church Matter.” The blockbuster book tells the story of the Church of the Nativity in Timonium, Md., which embarked on a total makeover that helped it come alive in the Spirit again and refocus on its true mission — a dramatic several-year transformation that serves as a model for parishes far and wide. The book inspired Father Barron and the board members to start thinking about “ways to get people back to church,” Rastiello said.

The website of St. Elizabeth’s, www.stelizabethschurch.org, contains a page that describes the mission of Ignite, which it says was built on a “legacy of optimism and hospitality” of the founding in 1985.

“We want to begin to create a state of Christian growth with purpose-filled activities,” the Ignite Team writes on its webpage, noting that every pope since St. John XXIII, has urged us to look back to our baptismal promise of becoming disciples, in deed, as well as word. “As we continue to write our story over the next ‘todays,’ we invite every parishioner to participate in the effort to revitalize his or her personal faith in Jesus Christ. We invite every parishioner to remember that each of us promised to ‘Go out’ to all nations, whether those nations are neighbors, friends, co- workers, children, or grandchildren. We invite each parishioner to make visible the youthful joy of love of God and unselfish love for every neighbor,” it states.

Read the full article at http://www.evergreeneditions.com/article/%E2%80%98Igniting%E2%80%99+Parishioners/2052306/265109/article.html.

Next Page


Publication List
Using a screen reader? Click Here