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The Beacon The Beacon July 30, 2015 : Page 1

3 BI S HOP B A PTIZE S B A BY A T M ASS IN M A DI S ON P A RI S H SUSSEX PASSAIC THE A W A RDWINNING NEW S P A PER OF THE R. C . DIO C E S E OF P A TER S ON, N.J. MORRIS JULY 30, 2015 Cathedral restoration set to enter final stage 10 4 The Catholic Center for Evangelization at Bayley-Ellard C LIFTON TEEN’ S S TRONG F A ITH LE A D S TO S ERVI C E A W A RD TEEN VOLUNTEER S S PRU C E UP CA THOLI C C H A RITIE S BUILDING S 5 6-7 10 1 1-16 16 Overview of historic renovation presented to Diocesan Finance Council, Presbyteral Council By RICHARD SOKERKA EDIT OR PATERSON The historic renovation 5 Y OUTH V IEWPOINT W HAT T O D O C LASSIFIEDS O BITUARIES DO NOT DELAY — TIME SENSITIVE NEWS and restoration of the Cathedral of St. John the Baptist is poised to enter the third and final phase of the proj-ect in the coming months. An overview of the work com-pleted and that which still needs to be done was presented to the Diocesan Finance Council and the Presbyteral Council by Dennis Rodano, diocesan project manager, and Rebeca Ruiz-Ulloa, diocesan ar-chitect, at two separate meetings held recently in the cathedral’s chapel while workers continued to complete the second phase of the project on the exterior of the cathe-dral. Bishop Serratelli told those gath-ered for the meetings that this was “an historical moment for the Diocese. The restoration of the cathedral and the funds being ex-pended for it are significant in this time in the history of our Church, when our religious freedoms are be-FINAL PHASE Dennis Rodano, diocesan project manager, explains the final phase of the Cathedral of St. John’s renovation BEACON PHOTO | JOE GIGLI and restoration project to members of the Diocesan Finance Council and senior staff at a meeting held inside the cathedral. ing challenged again and again. This restoration of our cathedral in one of the poorest areas of our state shows that we are committed to stay and will never retreat from city or from our mission to preach the Word of God and to evangelize in all we do.” Both the Finance Council and the Presbyteral Council voted unani-mously to move forward with the final phase of the project and have the Diocese award the contract to Zucchi & Sons as the general con-CONTINUED on 8 Parishes hold prayer service to honor St. Mary of Magdala By MICHAEL WOJCIK NE WS EDIT OR WAYNE St. Mary of Magdala has gotten an undeserved “bad rap”over the past 2,000 years of history. Somehow, this significant figure in salvation history — known as Mary Magdalene — has acquired a bad and inaccurate reputation that can-not be found anywhere in Scripture: that of a “prostitute,” a “public sin-ner” or a “fallen woman.” So in contrast, the parishes of Our Lady of Consolation (OLC) here and St. Mary, Pompton Lakes, joined together last week to celebrate a much more accurate picture of St. Mary of Magdala and her faithful legacy that many saints and theolo-gians have attempted to promote over the centuries: that of the “Apostle to the Apostles.” About 50 parishioners from the two Passaic County faith communities gathered at OLC for their fifth-annual vigil service, “Celebration of the Feast of St. Mary of Magdala: A Walk with Mary of Magdala,” on the evening of July 22, her feast day. “St. Mary of Magdala gets bad press. Scripture says that she was filled with demons, but when she met Jesus, her life had changed,” said Sister of the Church Arlene Kollar, OLC’s pastoral associate, who started the joint prayer service in honor of St. Mary of Magdala with her friend, Norbert Langer, a mem-ber of St. Mary’s adult choir and Justice and Peace Committee. “Think about how close St. Mary of Magdala was to Jesus. She walked with him during his ministry. She was brave to witness his death on Calvary, when other male disciples ran away. After the Resur rection, Jesus revealed himself to her first and then sent her to tell the other disciples. That’s why St. Jerome and others called St. Mary of Magdala the ‘Apostle to the Apostles,’ ” she said. The hour-long vigil service fol-lowed St. Mary of Magdala’s earthly and spiritual journey through a gen-tly interwoven tapestry of short Scripture passages, prayers, hymns and reflections, based on the Resurrection account in John 20:1-18. The evening concluded with a commissioning service to encourage participants to recommit themselves to “going out and making disciples” just as the honored saint had done, Sister Arlene said. Next to a black-and-white portrait ‘APOSTLE TO THE APOSTLES’ on 2

Cathedral Restoration Set To Enter Final Stage

Richard Sokerka

Overview of historic renovation presented to Diocesan Finance Council, Presbyteral Council

PATERSON The historic renovation and restoration of the Cathedral of St. John the Baptist is poised to enter the third and final phase of the project in the coming months.

An overview of the work completed and that which still needs to be done was presented to the Diocesan Finance Council and the Presbyteral Council by Dennis Rodano, diocesan project manager, and Rebeca Ruiz-Ulloa, diocesan architect, at two separate meetings held recently in the cathedral’s chapel while workers continued to complete the second phase of the project on the exterior of the cathedral.

Bishop Serratelli told those gathered for the meetings that this was “an historical moment for the Diocese. The restoration of the cathedral and the funds being expended for it are significant in this time in the history of our Church, when our religious freedoms are being challenged again and again. This restoration of our cathedral in one of the poorest areas of our state shows that we are committed to stay and will never retreat from city or from our mission to preach the Word of God and to evangelize in all we do.”

Both the Finance Council and the Presbyteral Council voted unanimously to move forward with the final phase of the project and have the Diocese award the contract to Zucchi & Sons as the general contractor at a cost of $7.073 million. The cost of the final phase contract brings the known cost of the restoration and renovations to $14.9 million, of which 70-75 percent of the cost went to immediate life safety concerns while the remaining 25-30 percent was earmarked for design elements.

The final phase, according to Rodano, “is the most complex stage since it involves interior work from the foundation to the ceiling and everything in between.” Once the final phase of the project begins, it is estimated to be completed in the fall of 2016.

The final phase will entail: stabilizing column footings which have been compromised over the decades; making the floor and choir loft structurally sound; replacing the entire plaster ceiling; installing a fire alarm system; bringing the electrical and lighting up to code; installing a limited use, limited access lift to the choir loft; adding two restrooms and relocating/renovating four restrooms for compliance; ensuring a barrier free entrance in the north courtyard; and the reconfiguration of the worship space by returning the altar to the front of the cathedral and creating additional seating for the faithful.

The Cathedral of St. John the Baptist, which was dedicated on July 31, 1870, has been closed since the fall of 2010 when a portion of the ceiling fell. “Numerous investigations were conducted to determine the extent of the issues that caused this, said Rodano. “The reports detailed a sizeable list of issues that we would need to address in order to reopen the cathedral. We then conducted a preliminary planning phase to determine the financial resources required to correct the deficiencies.”

Initial estimates that relied on limited visual inspections and preliminary structural testing/analysis projected the cost of repairs at $8 million, which included renovations that would make the roof trusses, flooring and choir loft structurally sound; repairing the damaged flooring; replacing the plaster ceiling and bringing electricity and lighting up to code as well as fixing exterior masonry. But as work on the first phase and then on the second phase on the cathedral’s exterior went on, more issues arose that had to be addressed. “We have engaged professionals to conduct both physical inspections and structural analyses to ensure that the program being implemented is the best use of our resources,” said Rodano. The first phase involved the tightening of truss connections; the installation of catwalks; the cleaning of the attic of debris from prior projects. The second phase, delayed by the bad weather during the winter, included the tower repointing; additional stone repairs, including the partial chimney demolition to the roofline and capping it, and grouting at top decks of the bell tower.

The cathedral’s restoration was one of the major case elements that were part of the Diocese’s 2012-13 Partners in Faith Capital and Endowment Campaign, with a minimum goal of $8 million to be raised for the cathedral repairs. Work on the cathedral ceased while the campaign was being conducted.

Partners in Faith successfully raised more than $61 million in pledges to be redeemed over the next few years by faithful and committed parishioners across the diocese. As campaign pledges continue to be met, Patrick Brennan, the Diocese’s Chief Finance Officer, projected that “Partners in Faith will generate at least $9.4 million for the cathedral’s repairs.”

“The generosity of the diocesan faithful to the Partners in Faith campaign allowed us to restart the planning of the cathedral renovation project in December 2013,” said Rodano. “Since then we have spent a great deal of time conducting detailed investigations of various elements of our cathedral and an equally substantial period of time developing a very detailed set of plans and specifications.

Brennan told the Finance Council and Presbyteral Council that “the funding gap after Partner in Faith pledges are met will be approximately $5.5 million (based on the cathedral’s anticipated restoration cost of $14.9 million).”

That amount, Brennan said, “can come from additional funding sources, including the Paterson Catholic Mission Fund (created after the sale of the Paterson Catholic property to the state in May).”

At the meeting with the Finance Council, Lori Hricik-DelGuercio, chairperson, praised the work being done by diocesan staff to ensure that the cathedral’s restoration “is being accomplished with every attention to detail and with the best use of its resources.”

Read the full article at http://www.evergreeneditions.com/article/Cathedral+Restoration+Set+To+Enter+Final+Stage/2231543/267553/article.html.

Parishes Hold Prayer Service To Honor St. Mary Of Magdala

Michael Wojcik

WAYNE St. Mary of Magdala has gotten an undeserved “bad rap”over the past 2,000 years of history. Somehow, this significant figure in salvation history — known as Mary Magdalene — has acquired a bad and inaccurate reputation that cannot be found anywhere in Scripture: that of a “prostitute,” a “public sinner” or a “fallen woman.”

So in contrast, the parishes of Our Lady of Consolation (OLC) here and St. Mary, Pompton Lakes, joined together last week to celebrate a much more accurate picture of St. Mary of Magdala and her faithful legacy that many saints and theologians have attempted to promote over the centuries: that of the “Apostle to the Apostles.” About 50 parishioners from the two Passaic County faith communities gathered at OLC for their fifth-annual vigil service, “Celebration of the Feast of St. Mary of Magdala: A Walk with Mary of Magdala,” on the evening of July 22, her feast day.

“St. Mary of Magdala gets bad press. Scripture says that she was filled with demons, but when she met Jesus, her life had changed,” said Sister of the Church Arlene Kollar, OLC’s pastoral associate, who started the joint prayer service in honor of St. Mary of Magdala with her friend, Norbert Langer, a member of St. Mary’s adult choir and Justice and Peace Committee. “Think about how close St. Mary of Magdala was to Jesus. She walked with him during his ministry. She was brave to witness his death on Calvary, when other male disciples ran away. After the Resurrection, Jesus revealed himself to her first and then sent her to tell the other disciples. That’s why St. Jerome and others called St. Mary of Magdala the ‘Apostle to the Apostles,’ ” she said.

The hour-long vigil service followed St. Mary of Magdala’s earthly and spiritual journey through a gently interwoven tapestry of short Scripture passages, prayers, hymns and reflections, based on the Resurrection account in John 20:1-18. The evening concluded with a commissioning service to encourage participants to recommit themselves to “going out and making disciples” just as the honored saint had done, Sister Arlene said.

Next to a black-and-white portrait painting of St. Mary of Magdala at empty tomb of Jesus near OLC’s altar, two lectors led the vigil service, which started with an introduction of the honored saint. Scripture “shows her as the primary witness to the most central events of Christian faith, named in exactly the same way in each of four Gospels written for diverse communities throughout the Mediterranean world,” they said.

“It was impossible to relate the story of the Resurrection without including ‘Mary, the one from Magdala,’ ” the introduction states, adding that Luke 8: 1-3 reports that she traveled with Jesus and supported his mission with her own financial resources. “In the synoptic Gospels, Mary leads the group of women who witness Jesus’ death, burial, the empty tomb and his Resurrection…John’s Gospel names Mary of Magdala as the first to discover the empty tomb and shows the Risen Christ sending her to announce the Good News of his Resurrection to the other disciples.”

The lectors also took participants through several “steps” of St. Mary of Magdala’s experience of the Resurrection. They included: her arrival at the tomb; the Apostles going to see for themselves; their noticing that Jesus was not there; their believing Jesus’ Resurrection after seeing him; their understanding the significance of what they saw; Mary’s weeping at the tomb; her seeing Jesus but not recognizing him; the moment that she recognizes him; and then her going to tell the other disciples.

Each “step” of the vigil service included a brief Scripture passage; reflection questions for participants to ask themselves about what St. Mary of Magdala might have been thinking or feeling and how they might relate to her experience; a prayer read by the lectors, followed by a communal prayer; and then everyone singing verses from a related hymn, “I Have Seen the Lord” by Bob Hurd. One of the steps encouraged participants to reflect on the following concept: “We are people, like Mary, with a mission — to tell people what we have seen, what we have heard, what we believe — not to “cling” to what came before — the earthly Jesus — but to ‘be’ part of the new glorified Body of Christ, who now lives in and through the community of believers.”

Toward the conclusion of the service, Sister Arlene led a commissioning ceremony, anointing the palms of participants and urging them to take up the mission of becoming “witnesses like Mary of Magdala — called to accept the challenge of being a follower of Jesus and to live as He did.” Then, they all sang the hymn, “We Are Called” by David Haas, and recited the Lord’s Prayer.

The vigil service to St. Mary of Magdala started five years ago, after Sister Arlene had attended a similar service at St. Elizabeth Parish, Wyckoff, in the Archdiocese of Newark. She spoke about starting such a service locally with Langer, whom she has known since the days she served St. Mary’s, before moving to OLC. Langer said that, around the same time, he also had been thinking about starting a service in honor of the saint.

“Poor homiletics and confusion with other women in the Bible over the centuries made people in the Church think that St. Mary of Magdala was an adulterer and a fallen woman. But she experienced the Resurrection — an incredible gift to her and the whole Church. It is great to have her as a role model for women today to emulate,” said Langer, who noted that OLC and St. Mary’s alternate hosting the service from year to year. “We are from neighboring towns and coming together in faith is a nice byproduct,” he said.

A first-time participant, Sophie Marshall of OLC, said she found the vigil service “instructive and inspirational.”

“It was prayer from a woman’s point of view. St. Mary of Magdala stayed with Jesus at the Cross and went to the tomb [after the Resurrection]. She was a woman of means, not a harlot,” Marshall said. “It showed how strong women like her are.”

Read the full article at http://www.evergreeneditions.com/article/Parishes+Hold+Prayer+Service+To+Honor+St.+Mary+Of+Magdala/2231544/267553/article.html.

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