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The Beacon The Beacon September 24, 2015 : Page 1

12-13 BI S HOP BLE SS E S ACS ’ NEW CA MPU S , M C S PORT S FIELD SEPTEMBER 24, 2015 SUSSEX PASSAIC THE A W A RDWINNING NEW S P A PER OF THE R. C . DIO C E S E OF P A TER S ON, N.J. MORRIS 11 The Catholic Center for Evangelization at Bayley-Ellard ‘F AMILIES F ULLY A LIVE IN C HRIST ’ Bishop meets with families at Evangelization Center prior to Pope’s arrival at World Meeting of Families By CECILE SAN AGUSTIN REPOR TER 8-9 14 M ASS HONOR S TWO FILIPINO SA INT S WHO WERE M A RTYR S A T 85, C HE S TER WOM A N BE C OME S A CA THOLI C 10 11 15 16-17 18-23 DO NOT DELAY — TIME SENSITIVE NEWS Y OUTH W HAT T O D O O BITUARIES V IEWPOINT C LASSIFIEDS MADISON For families, there is no place like home. To share that message and stress the importance of families in the life of the Church, Bishop Serratelli met with families from across the diocese in the first-ever dioce-san event, “Families Fully Alive in Christ,” Sept. 20. The event, held at St. Paul’s Inside the Walls, the diocesan Evangelization Center here, was emceed by Relevant Radio 1430 AM host John Harper who did a live broadcast. The diocesan Office of Family Life coordinated the day. The diocesan event for families coincided with the World Meeting of Families taking place this week in Philadelphia where Pope Francis will cel-ebrate the clos-ing Mass Sept. 27. The gather-ing that cele-brated family life also had music provided by a family — Jim and Coleen Caulfield and their twin sons, Michael and Christopher, of St. Peter the Apostle Parish in Parsippany Bishop Serratelli told the families, “We know there is nothing more important than a good family life. That is the very basis of civi-lization. Our Holy Father, Pope Francis, has said that the family is necessary for the sur-vival of humanity. Without the family the cul-tural survival of the human race is at risk. In fact, his predecessor, Pope Emeritus Benedict XVI, said that the family is the irreplaceable school of virtue. We are made for love.” He talked about a recent study on teen-agers and how the majority said it was more important to have a good marriage and to raise a healthy family than to have lots of WMF on 2 FAMILY FUN Father Brian Ditullio, chaplain/teacher at Pope John XXIII High School in Sparta, who is a BEACON PHOTO | JOE GIGLI trained circus performer, does a juggling act as families gather around him during the diocesan event, “Families Fully Alive in Christ,” at St. Paul’s Inside the Walls in Madison Sept. 20. Bishop’s Annual Appeal helps those who battle addictions By CECILE SAN AGUSTIN REPOR TER PATERSON Addiction doesn’t discriminate — it affects the young and old, the poor and rich, and people of every race, religion and background. In the fore-front of helping those addict-ed to drugs and alcohol for the last 60 years is Straight & Narrow (S&N), an agency of diocesan Catholic Charities. With its main headquar-ters located in downtown Pater son, S&N has saved countless lives. Since its in-ception more than 60,000 people, who have been ad-dicted to drugs and alcohol, those living with HIV/AIDS, and children and families with the desire to become stronger have been served by the agency. Under the theme, “Serving Christ Among Us,” S&N is one of the recipients of the 2015 2015 Bishop’s Annual Appeal. The Appeal will also support diocesan Catholic Charities’ two other agencies — Catholic Family and Community Services and the Department for Persons with Disabilities. In addition, students attending Catholic schools in and around the inner city, the education of diocesan semi-narians and Nazareth Village, the retired priest’s residence, will also be assist-ed by the Appeal. Joe Duffy, who is execu-tive director of S&N and president of diocesan Catholic Charities, said, “The Bishop’s Annual Appeal con-tinues to provide more than $1 million to our Catholic Charities agencies each year. While we receive a great deal of government funds, we could not make ends meet without the support of the Appeal, without your support. The gifts that you BAA on 4

‘Families Fully Alive In Christ’

Cecile San Agustin

Bishop meets with families at Evangelization Center prior to Pope’s arrival at World Meeting of Families

MADISON For families, there is no place like home. To share that message and stress the importance of families in the life of the Church, Bishop Serratelli met with families from across the diocese in the first-ever diocesan event, “Families Fully Alive in Christ,” Sept.20.

The event, held at St. Paul’s Inside the Walls, the diocesan Evangelization Center here, was emceed by Relevant Radio 1430 AM host John Harper who did a live broadcast. The diocesan Office of Family Life coordinated the day. The diocesan event for families coincided with the World Meeting of Families taking place this week in Philadelphia where Pope Francis will celebrate the closing Mass Sept.27.

The gathering that celebrated family life also had music provided by a family — Jim and Coleen Caulfield and their twin sons, Michael and Christopher, of St. Peter the Apostle Parish in Parsippany

Bishop Serratelli told the families, “We know there is nothing more important than a good family life. That is the very basis of civilization. Our Holy Father, Pope Francis, has said that the family is necessary for the survival of humanity. Without the family the cultural survival of the human race is at risk. In fact, his predecessor, Pope Emeritus Benedict XVI, said that the family is the irreplaceable school of virtue. We are made for love.”

He talked about a recent study on teenagers and how the majority said it was more important to have a good marriage and to raise a healthy family than to have lots of money or fame. “Our young people get it. They want home sweet home. They know its value instinctively — the importance of a happy home and good marriage,” the Bishop said.

Tragically, there are many forces in society ready to tear down the very foundation of family life, the Bishop told families. He cited the high divorce rates among baby boomers; the many children who are not living with their natural fathers; how marriage isn’t seen as sacred as destination weddings have become a popular trend; and the number of couples living together outside of marriage.

“I thank the many families today rebelling against this culture by giving a witness to good family life,” said the Bishop. “A house is merely a place where families love each other and make it a home. A home is all about friendship, sacrifice, about caring, and most especially, about faith — faith in one another and faith in God. Love makes a home a place of peace and joy and it is always the love of God that does so. Marriage is not always easy to live especially in today’s culture but marriage — good marriage — is gospel for our secularized world. A good marriage is the only force that can transform the world in a word, “ ’mid pleasures and palaces though we may roam, be it ever so humble, there’s no place like home.’ ”

Following his talk, family members were invited to ask the Bishop questions, many of which were centered on family life.

Sandy Clark from St. Mary Parish in Dover asked the Bishop, “How can parents strengthen their families in today’s world and continue to live out the sanctity of marriage?”

The Bishop responded by answering, “Prayer. Common prayer together. This is one of the joys of my family. My family went to Mass together every Sunday. Every single Sunday. From my mother, who lived to 99, to my youngest great grandnephew, so I think the family that prays together stays together. Sunday Eucharist has to be shared at the Lord’s table and the table at home. Family meals together are important. Another thing is family prayer. Don’t be afraid as a family to come together every evening and pray. The family who is always united to the Lord will always be united to each other.”

Eight-year-old Gianna Nelson from Sacred Heart Parish in Rockaway, asked the Bishop what was his favorite Catholic family tradition. The Bishop responded, “My favorite is Sunday Mass. We always went together as a family and then there was always a treat — we had spaghetti afterward.”

Gianna also answered the question from the Bishop about her favorite tradition. She said, “Christmas.”

Another question was asked by Larry Scienski from Our Lady of Good Counsel Parish in Pompton Plains: “How do we continue to engage our children to continue to practice their Catholic faith?”

The Bishop answered, “We lose a lot of our young people for some reason. I think the most effective way is by example of our faith. If young people see that their faith matters to their parents, even when they go away for college and they gradually fall away, the example of their parents will come back to speak to them very strongly. I think also involvement in parish life through youth groups when they are very young is important. We can’t just have catechetical instruction for our young people. There has to be something more in the Church.”

Following the Bishop’s talk and the question and answer session, the celebration moved outside to the lawn of St. Paul’s as families enjoyed games, cotton candy and popcorn and had the opportunity to take a photo with “Pope Francis” via a life size cut-out of the pope. Families also were invited to take part in an activity featuring a seashell to take home to remember the day.

The Bishop ended the day by giving a blessing to all the families in attendance.

Read the full article at http://www.evergreeneditions.com/article/%E2%80%98Families+Fully+Alive+In+Christ%E2%80%99/2275743/273971/article.html.

Bishop’s Annual Appeal Helps Those Who Battle Addictions

Cecile San Agustin

PATERSON Addiction doesn’t discriminate — it affects the young and old, the poor and rich, and people of every race, religion and background. In the forefront of helping those addicted to drugs and alcohol for the last 60 years is Straight & Narrow (S&N), an agency of diocesan Catholic Charities.

With its main headquarters located in downtown Pater son, S&N has saved countless lives. Since its inception more than 60,000 people, who have been addicted to drugs and alcohol, those living with HIV/AIDS, and children and families with the desire to become stronger have been served by the agency.

Under the theme, “Serving Christ Among Us,” S&N is one of the recipients of the 2015 Bishop’s Annual Appeal. The Appeal will also support diocesan Catholic Charities’ two other agencies — Catholic Family and Community Services and the Department for Persons with Disabilities. In addition, students attending Catholic schools in and around the inner city, the education of diocesan seminarians and Nazareth Village, the retired priest’s residence, will also be assisted by the Appeal.

Joe Duffy, who is executive director of S&N and president of diocesan Catholic Charities, said, “The Bishop’s Annual Appeal continues to provide more than $1 million to our Catholic Charities agencies each year. While we receive a great deal of government funds, we could not make ends meet without the support of the Appeal, without your support. The gifts that you will pledge to the Appeal are very important to us.”

The largest and oldest rehabilitation facility of its kind in the state, Straight and Narrow provides a diversity of programs to those affected by substance abuse as well as community programs to build stronger families. The one-of-a-kind agency is known across the nation for its specialized services to those battling drug and alcohol addiction. Through its residential facilities, men, women — including those who are pregnant or with infants — and teen boys receive around-the-clock help for six to 12 months. Programs, such as the 12-step program and individual and group counseling, help clients overcome addictions by seeking the source of their behavior.

Funds for the Appeal directly help about 250 men, women, adolescents and even infants and toddlers living at S&N’s residential treatment programs. Something as basic as undergarments and personal hygiene products can be expensive and often are taken for granted, said Duffy.

“BAA is one of the money sources we go to for this,” said Duffy. “The majority of our clients live below the poverty line and many are completely indigent. One true story, we had a new admission, who had no clothes but those on his back and they needed to be replaced. There was virtually nothing that fit him in our warehouse. While we rely heavily on clothes donations for clients in need, we occasionally need to buy clothes and footwear for the smallest of sizes to the largest. And we never give clients used undergarments. Out of respect for human dignity and sanitary reasons we only give new items.”

In addition to these basic necessities, BAA also helps cover the costs for clients striving for their GED. S&N offers GED classes four times a week and most of the clients cannot afford the $100 it costs for the study guide and to take the test.

“A client’s chances of remaining sober and drug free are better if he or she has a job,” Duffy said. “And getting a job is easier if a person has a high school diploma.”

With donations to the Appeal, S&N also gives every client that comes into its residential program a life-saving book. “We give each client his or her own copy of the ‘AA Big Book’ or ‘NA Basic Text.’ We hope they will keep that gift for the rest of a long life and use it as a resource to help them remain sober. This past year, we again spent more than $10,000 for these books.”

In addition to the treatment facilities, S&N provides outpatient counseling, medical detox, an intoxicated driver resource center, methadone maintenance, housing for persons with HIV/AIDS, a family success center and two day care centers for children living in Paterson. S&N welcomes visits to its facilities for those who want to witness firsthand their Appeal donations at work.

Read the full article at http://www.evergreeneditions.com/article/Bishop%E2%80%99s+Annual+Appeal+Helps+Those+Who+Battle+Addictions/2275746/273971/article.html.

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