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The Beacon The Beacon November 5, 2015 : Page 1

SUSSEX 3 C LIFTON P A RI S H S ET TO IN S T A LL ELEV A TOR PASSAIC THE A W A RDWINNING NEW S P A PER OF THE R. C . DIO C E S E OF P A TER S ON, N.J. MORRIS NOVEMBER 5, 2015 12 2 The Catholic Center for Evangelization at Bayley-Ellard Appeal donors are investing in the future of the Diocese by supporting seminarians By CECILE SAN AGUSTIN REPOR TER DIOCESAN SEMINARIAN BI S HOP VI S IT S S T. FR A N C I S OF ASS I S I P A RI S H IN H AS KELL 10 YOUTH FROM C ITY P A RI S HE S A TTEND RETRE A T ON C H AS TITY 8 10-1 1 12 13-14 15-20 O BITUARIES Y OUTH W HAT T O D O V IEWPOINT C LASSIFIEDS CLIFTON Over the years, the Paterson Diocese has been blessed with many men answering the call to the priesthood carrying out the ministry of Jesus Christ. Last May, the Diocese was recognized as having the largest ordination class in the country, along with the Archdiocese of Chicago, when Bishop Serratelli or-dained 14 men to the priesthood. Also, earlier this year, 10 men were ordained by the Bishop as transitional deacons and will be ordained to the priesthood next May. Currently there are 59 seminarians in the formation process for the Diocese of Paterson studying at different seminaries around the country and abroad. Since Bishop Serratelli was in-stalled as the Diocese’s seventh 2015 Bishop in 2004, the increase in vocations to the priesthood and religious life has risen dramatical-ly. The opportunity for diocesan seminarians to be educated and to be fully prepared to serve as priests relies on the help of the laity. Because of this, seminarian education is one of the beneficiar-ies of the 2015 Bishop’s Annual Appeal. This year, under the theme, “Serving Christ Among Us,” the Bishop’s Annual Appeal not only sup-ports seminarians studying for the priesthood but also diocesan Catholic Charities agencies; inner city area Catholic schools in the diocese; and Nazareth Village, the retired diocesan priests’ residence in Chester. Father Hubert Jurjewicz, dioce-san director of vocations, said, “The diocesan priesthood is a call, not a career. It is a way of life, not a job and it is an identity, not Cesar Jaramillo, a seminarian of the Diocese of Paterson and a parishioner of St. Anthony Parish in Passaic, received the Ministry of Lector from Coadjutor Archbishop Bernard Hebda of Newark last year in the Chapel of the Immaculate Conception at the Pontifical North American College in Rome, where he is studying for the priesthood. PHOTO | COURTESY OF THE PONTIFICAL NORTH AMERICAN COLLEGE just a role. Priests are called to be accessible, approachable and available to people and their con-cerns. I thank all our priests for their hard work and for their ex-ample as we remind ourselves that our young people are in-spired to the priesthood by priests who themselves live joyful, happy lives serving the Church. It re-mains true that the best examples of priesthood are joyful priests who love their faith and who love the Church.” Last year, the Diocese allocated $751,997 to help fund the cost of seminarian education. On average, one year of priestly formation for one seminarian costs $47,000. Father Jurjewicz said, “The bless-ing of these many vocations pres-ents one particular challenge — we need help in meeting the cost to educate our seminarians. Would you be willing to make an investment in the future of the Diocese by helping support the ANNUAL APPEAL on 5 ‘A BEACON OF TRUTH IN A CULTURE THAT HAS LOST ITS WAY’ DO NOT DELAY — TIME SENSITIVE NEWS Bethlehem Hermitage celebrates 40 years as place of peace By MICHAEL WOJCIK NE WS EDIT OR CHESTER Nestled in southern Morris County’s rustic landscape, the Bethlehem Hermitage here celebrated 40 years of serving the Paterson Diocese as a “place of peace and prayer” for guests and the residing hermits and, more broadly, of shining as “a beacon of truth in a culture that has lost its way” during a well-attended anniversary Mass on Oct. 31 at St. Lawrence the Martyr Church, also in Chester. The main celebrant of the 10 a.m. Mass was retired Auxiliary Bishop Dominic Marconi of Newark and was concelebrated by more than a dozen priests from the diocese and religious orders, including from the hermitage, which is located on Pleasant Hill Road here. They included “Desert” Father Eugene Romano, the her-mitage’s founder; Father Mariusz Koch of the Franciscan Friars of the Renewal, who oversees Bethlehem part-time; and Father Nicholas Bozza, St. Lawrence’s pas-tor. Also in attendance were many clergy, religious and laity, who have prayed at the hermitage over the years, as well as benefactors and volunteers. “On this 40th anniversary of Bethlehem Hermitage, we give thanks to God for the many bless-ings for those who have come for retreats,” Bishop Marconi said at the start of Mass, which conclud-ed with a slide show of the histo-ry, people and events of the her-mitage. Founded March 5, 1975, Bethlehem Hermitage sits on 18 acres of land and consists of sev-eral small wooden cottages. Each of the five hermits here lives in his or her solitary cabin, combin-ing hours of work with hours of prayer. The hermitage has cot-tages for guests and also houses a central building with a chapel. “Today, we thank God for his blessings over these 40 years — his generosity, kindness, protec-tion and providence and the good people, who have made Bethlehem a place of peace and the treasure that it is,” said Father Koch, who credited Father Romano for following God’s provi-dence and the Holy Spirit’s guid-ance as a young man in “dream-ing a great dream.” “Bethlehem is a place of miracles for priests, re-ligious and laity. It’s not only a place to find God, but also a place to be found by God. It’s a HERMITAGE on 6

Appeal Donors Are Investing In The Future Of The Diocese By Supporting Seminarians

Cecile San Agustin

CLIFTON Over the years, the Paterson Diocese has been blessed with many men answering the call to the priesthood carrying out the ministry of Jesus Christ. Last May, the Diocese was recognized as having the largest ordination class in the country, along with the Archdiocese of Chicago, when Bishop Serratelli ordained 14 men to the priesthood. Also, earlier this year, 10 men were ordained by the Bishop as transitional deacons and will be ordained to the priesthood next May. Currently there are 59 seminarians in the formation process for the Diocese of Paterson studying at different seminaries around the country and abroad.

Since Bishop Serratelli was installed as the Diocese’s seventh Bishop in 2004, the increase in vocations to the priesthood and religious life has risen dramatically. The opportunity for diocesan seminarians to be educated and to be fully prepared to serve as priests relies on the help of the laity. Because of this, seminarian education is one of the beneficiaries of the 2015 Bishop’s Annual Appeal.

This year, under the theme, “Serving Christ Among Us,” the Bishop’s Annual Appeal not only supports seminarians studying for the priesthood but also diocesan Catholic Charities agencies; inner city area Catholic schools in the diocese; and Nazareth Village, the retired diocesan priests’ residence in Chester.

Father Hubert Jurjewicz, diocesan director of vocations, said, “The diocesan priesthood is a call, not a career. It is a way of life, not a job and it is an identity, not just a role. Priests are called to be accessible, approachable and available to people and their concerns. I thank all our priests for their hard work and for their example as we remind ourselves that our young people are inspired to the priesthood by priests who themselves live joyful, happy lives serving the Church. It remains true that the best examples of priesthood are joyful priests who love their faith and who love the Church.”

Last year, the Diocese allocated $751,997 to help fund the cost of seminarian education. On average, one year of priestly formation for one seminarian costs $47,000. Father Jurjewicz said, “The blessing of these many vocations presents one particular challenge — we need help in meeting the cost to educate our seminarians. Would you be willing to make an investment in the future of the Diocese by helping support the men who will bring the Sacraments, priestly presence and spiritual guidance to you, your children and your grandchildren?”

Seminarians experience long days of study during the week with times of prayer and Mass. They also have meetings throughout the week with spiritual directors, formation advisers and small group formation. Many times, seminarians also help out at local parishes to serve God’s people through various ministries on the weekend.

In addition to tuition and room and board, the Bishop’s Annual Appeal helps with retreat costs, books and a small stipend that seminarians are paid to help with incidental expenses.

Father Jurjewicz invites young people to consider the priesthood. “It offers an opportunity to live a meaningful life with a clear purpose in a variety of different situations,” he said. “Priesthood offers you the opportunity to make a valuable contribution to the Christian community by bringing hope and healing to many.”

To support the 2015 Bishop’s Annual Appeal, parishioners can make a one-time gift or make a pledge to be paid over several months.

“The number of seminarians now in formation is a blessing. We need priests but with such an increase in number of seminarians there comes an increased need for funding,” Father Jurjewicz said. “Thank you to all of you who pray for and promote vocations at the parish level. Sometimes all that is necessary is for someone in the parish or diocese to suggest the notion of vocation to a young person. You can be that someone today. Parents and friends need to encourage, not discourage. Young people need permission and reassurance to talk about and consider the priesthood. My prayer is that conversation will begin now. If the priesthood appeals to you, please contact me directly for a conversation or contact any of the priests in your parish or the diocese,” he said.

Read the full article at http://www.evergreeneditions.com/article/Appeal+Donors+Are+Investing+In+The+Future+Of+The+Diocese+By+Supporting+Seminarians/2315400/279692/article.html.

Bethlehem Hermitage Celebrates 40 Years As Place Of Peace

Michael Wojcik

CHESTER Nestled in southern Morris County’s rustic landscape, the Bethlehem Hermitage here celebrated 40 years of serving the Paterson Diocese as a “place of peace and prayer” for guests and the residing hermits and, more broadly, of shining as “a beacon of truth in a culture that has lost its way” during a well-attended anniversary Mass on Oct. 31 at St. Lawrence the Martyr Church, also in Chester.

The main celebrant of the 10 a.m. Mass was retired Auxiliary Bishop Dominic Marconi of Newark and was concelebrated by more than a dozen priests from the diocese and religious orders, including from the hermitage, which is located on Pleasant Hill Road here. They included “Desert” Father Eugene Romano, the hermitage’s founder; Father Mariusz Koch of the Franciscan Friars of the Renewal, who oversees Bethlehem part-time; and Father Nicholas Bozza, St. Lawrence’s pastor. Also in attendance were many clergy, religious and laity, who have prayed at the hermitage over the years, as well as benefactors and volunteers.

“On this 40th anniversary of Bethlehem Hermitage, we give thanks to God for the many blessings for those who have come for retreats,” Bishop Marconi said at the start of Mass, which concluded with a slide show of the history, people and events of the hermitage.

Founded March 5, 1975, Bethlehem Hermitage sits on 18 acres of land and consists of several small wooden cottages. Each of the five hermits here lives in his or her solitary cabin, combining hours of work with hours of prayer. The hermitage has cottages for guests and also houses a central building with a chapel.

“Today, we thank God for his blessings over these 40 years — his generosity, kindness, protection and providence and the good people, who have made Bethlehem a place of peace and the treasure that it is,” said Father Koch, who credited Father Romano for following God’s providence and the Holy Spirit’s guidance as a young man in “dreaming a great dream.” “Bethlehem is a place of miracles for priests, religious and laity. It’s not only a place to find God, but also a place to be found by God. It’s a place to find peace of heart. It’s a place to let go of the hurt and begin again and to listen to God in the silence and clearly hear his will,” the priest said.

In his Plan for Bethlehem Hermits, Father Romano wrote: “The Hermit of Bethlehem is not in isolation but in communion with the Body of Christ with the serious responsibility to pray for the Church.” Later, he remarked that a hermit is “a servant of the Church who stands in the presence of the triune God, seeking life of greater separation from the world, of unceasing prayer and penance in the silence of solitude for the praise of God and the salvation of the world.”

For the hermits, each day begins at 4 a.m., with several hours of prayer and worship, including Adoration of the Blessed Sacrament in their individual hermitages and Mass in the chapel. The hermits eat their meals in solitude, except on Sundays and solemnities when they gather for the main meal, said Father Romano, who now lives at St. Joseph Home for the Elderly, Totowa.

The prayerful peace and silence of the hermitage serves as “an antidote to the ceaseless chatter of our culture.” It also enables faithful to join in the fight against Satan and efforts to address the breakdown of the values in society, said Father Koch, who called “Bethlehem a beacon of truth in a culture that has lost its way.”

Although unable to attend the 40th anniversary Mass, Bishop Serratelli because of prior commitments, he sent a greeting that was read after the liturgy. He congratulated Bethlehem Hermitage for being involved in “a life of unceasing prayer, obedience, and penance; for serving “the spiritual needs of the people of the diocese;” and for hermits, who witness to the hermitical life.”

Father Romano addressed the congregation after Mass, proclaiming, “My heart is filled with love for each of you.”

“Thank you for celebrating this special day. The Lord has been good to us. God has been working in Bethlehem. We would not be here today if not for your generosity, talents and time. This is the work of the Church and you are the Church,” said Father Romano, followed by a standing ovation.

Before walking out of St. Lawrence, one churchgoer, Walter Michura, along with his wife, Theresa, noted that they live around the corner from the Bethlehem Hermitage and enjoy its “silence and solitude.”

“It [spending time at the hermitage] has deepened my faith and is a chance to get away from the maddening crowd,” said Walter Michura, who has been friends with Father Romano, since they were young men.

In 1974, Bishop Lawrence Casey approved the establishment of a “Desert House of Prayer.” Seven years after the hermitage’s founding, Father Romano envisioned a community of dedicated and consecrated men and women who would lead a vowed, “desert lives” of prayer, silence and solitude. In 1997, Bishop Emeritus Rodimer canonically elevated the community to that of a “Laura (colony) of Consecrated Hermits of Diocesan Right.”

The hermitage’s influence has extended well beyond the diocese’s boundaries. As a “consultant,” it has helped hermitages in other dioceses — in the U.S. and around the world, Father Romano told The Beacon 10 years ago for Bethlehem’s 30 anniversary. “It’s been a fruitful apostolate of prayer and spiritual guidance.

”One of those faithful whom God called to a life of a hermit is Sister Eucharia Lifieri, who has lived at Bethlehem since 2007. She said her life of solitude and silence “helps me to pray and to focus on God and what’s important in life.”

“All that time of peace and quiet before the Blessed Sacrament is powerful. There, I beg for God’s mercy to be showered on the world. I believe that I’m helping to make the whole world a better place,” said Sister Eucharia.

Read the full article at http://www.evergreeneditions.com/article/Bethlehem+Hermitage+Celebrates+40+Years+As+Place+Of+Peace/2315413/279692/article.html.

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