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The Beacon The Beacon January 7, 2015 : Page 1

2 S TILL TIME TO M A KE A DON A TION TO THE BE AC ON’ S S H A RING FUND SUSSEX PASSAIC THE A W A RDWINNING NEW S P A PER OF THE R. C . DIO C E S E OF P A TER S ON, N.J. MORRIS JANUARY 7, 2016 Bishop helps St. Vincent Martyr School in Madison break ground on $2M addition 12 5 The Catholic Center for Evangelization at Bayley-Ellard By MICHAEL WOJCIK NE WS EDIT OR BI S HOP C ELEBR A TE S NEW YE A R’ S D A Y M ASS IN W A YNE C HUR C H BI S HOP M A RK S FE AS T OF EPIPH A NY A T S T. P A UL P A RI S H IN C LIFTON 9 10-1 1 12 13-16 6 O BITUARIES V IEWPOINT W HAT T O D O C LASSIFIEDS MADISON With a helpful hand from students, Bishop Serratelli turned over a ceremonial shovelful of soil on Monday to break ground on a $2 million, two-story addition to St. Vincent Martyr School here scheduled for completion by August. It will provide six more classrooms and much-needed breathing room for an upper-grade student population that has grown fourfold in recent years since the re-establishment of the middle-school grades. On a chilly afternoon, Jan. 4, the feast day of St. Elizabeth Ann Seton, founder of the first Catholic school in the U.S., Bishop Serratelli joined Diocesan school officials, lo-cal officials and members of the St. Vincent’s parish and school communities for a groundbreaking ceremony to kick off the long-awaited construction project to build the new 5,964-square-foot building. All of St. Vincent’s 458 students wore yellow hard hats, while several of them also partici-pated in the event, which included the Bishop’s blessing of the ground at the construction site, located at PAY DIRT A smiling Bishop Serratelli happily receives help from an enthusiastic BEACON PHOTO | JOE GIGLI group of students from St. Vincent Martyr School, Madison, in lifting a shovelful of soil on Jan. 4, during a groundbreaking ceremony for a $2 million, two-story addition to the school. The new facility will house six classrooms and a state-of-the-art science room. The students helping the bishop are (from left) Juliette Occhino, Norah Aycock, Santiago Rodriguez and Alex Gitto. the rear of the existing school building and between the school and the parish center. “The right moment is now. We need to incorporate the middle school culture into St. Vincent Martyr School, so that the students can spread out a bit. The new ad-dition will allow for a better learn-ing environment, enhance the over-all school and benefit the entire school population,” said Msgr. George Hundt, St. Vincent’s pastor, who participated in the ground-breaking ceremony and also turned over a small portion of soil outside, using a ceremonial silver shovel. The pastor called the well-attended event — which included the read-ing of prayers and Scripture pas-sages — “a wonderful experience.” Designed to match the height of the exciting school building, the ad-dition will house three classrooms and also bathrooms on each of its two levels, as well as a state-of-the-art science room, ready for STEM [Science, Technology, Engineering and Math] instruction. Plans — which began to take shape more than a year ago — also call for the refurbishment of the kitchen in the school and implementation of small but important details, such as paint-ing the interior of the building with colors that are conductive to learn-ing like yellows, greens and blues, said Barbara Doyle, St. Vincent’s principal from 2007-09, who has led the fund-raising campaign and the school’s Task Force. So far, St. Vincent’s has raised $1.85 million of the $2 million BREAK GROUND on 7 DO NOT DELAY — TIME SENSITIVE NEWS Pro-lifers in Diocese prepare for annual March for Life By CECILE SAN AGUSTIN REPOR TER for Life mean to you? For some, it means protesting the sin of abor-tion. For others, it’s standing to-gether in solidarity with other like-minded pro-lifers to be a voice for the voiceless in the womb. Whatever the reason for attend-ing the March for Life, thousands from the Paterson Diocese are gearing up to head to Washington, D.C. on Friday, Jan. 22 and join tens of thousands more from around the United States and abroad to promote life. Father Michael Rodak, pastor of CLIFTON What does the March A day of sacrifice, spiritual prayer and visible witness Our Lady Queen of Peace in West Milford and diocesan pilgrimage director, considers the March for Life a day of sacrifice, spiritual prayer and the visible witness of people who are truly concerned about life in the womb. “Attending the March shows that there are people really concerned about hu-man life, especially the life of the unborn,” he said. “We are saying we really do care about the inno-cent lives and about our future. Abortion not only destroys a life, it March For Life ’16 destroys a generation.” With many anti-abortion advo-cates claiming being pro-life is an-ti-woman, the March for Life theme reminds everyone that the pro-life message is very supportive of women. The theme this year is “Pro-life and Pro-Woman Go Hand in Hand.” Father Rodak said, “This is something we do have to be mind-ful of when we March. Being pro-life supports motherhood and we are actually honoring the Blessed Mother, who is an important part of salvation history through the birth of her son, Jesus. We need to celebrate this.” The March for Life takes place every year on a weekday on or around the anniversary of the Supreme Court decision, Roe v. Wade, which made abortion legal on Jan. 22, 1973. The March be-gins with a rally at noon on the National Mall followed immediate-ly by the March down Constitution VISIBLE WITNESS on 9

Bishop Helps St. Vincent Martyr School In Madison Break Ground On $2m Additio

Michael Wojcik

MADISON With a helpful hand from students, Bishop Serratelli turned over a ceremonial shovelful of soil on Monday to break ground on a $2 million, two-story addition to St. Vincent Martyr School here scheduled for completion by August. It will provide six more classrooms and much-needed breathing room for an upper-grade student population that has grown fourfold in recent years since the re-establishment of the middleschool grades.

On a chilly afternoon, Jan. 4, the feast day of St. Elizabeth Ann Seton, founder of the first Catholic school in the U.S., Bishop Serratelli joined Diocesan school officials, local officials and members of the St. Vincent’s parish and school communities for a groundbreaking ceremony to kick off the longawaited construction project to build the new 5,964-square-foot building. All of St. Vincent’s 458 students wore yellow hard hats, while several of them also participated in the event, which included the Bishop’s blessing of the ground at the construction site, located at the rear of the existing school building and between the school and the parish center.

“The right moment is now. We need to incorporate the middle school culture into St. Vincent Martyr School, so that the students can spread out a bit. The new addition will allow for a better learning environment, enhance the overall school and benefit the entire school population,” said Msgr.George Hundt, St. Vincent’s pastor, who participated in the groundbreaking ceremony and also turned over a small portion of soil outside, using a ceremonial silver shovel.The pastor called the well-attended event — which included the reading of prayers and Scripture passages — “a wonderful experience.”

Designed to match the height of the exciting school building, the addition will house three classrooms and also bathrooms on each of its two levels, as well as a state-of-theart science room, ready for STEM [Science, Technology, Engineering and Math] instruction. Plans — which began to take shape more than a year ago — also call for the refurbishment of the kitchen in the school and implementation of small but important details, such as painting the interior of the building with colors that are conductive to learning like yellows, greens and blues, said Barbara Doyle, St. Vincent’s principal from 2007-09, who has led the fund-raising campaign and the school’s Task Force.

So far, St. Vincent’s has raised $1.85 million of the $2 million

Break ground: $2M expansion under way at school in Madison needed for the project from donors from the parish and school communities, its Home School Association (HSA) and diocesan School Office. This impressive total thus far stands as a testament to the generosity of the parish community, which also has been contributing to “Building the Future — The Future Starts Now,” an ongoing campaign to fund an extensive upcoming church renovation project, Msgr. Hundt said.

“It’s wonderful that we are expanding,” said Sister of Charity Noreen Holly, principal, who noted that St. Vincent’s students hail from other municipalities, including East Hanover, Chatham, Florham Park, Morristown and Summit. “St. Vincent’s helps parents with their challenge to raise their children in the Catholic faith.”

Other dignitaries, who overturned a shovelful of soil at the ceremony were: Sister Noreen; Sister Rosemary Moynihan, general superior of the Sisters of Charity, who have staffed the school since it opened; Doyle, Kieran Flanagan, Tom Dwyer and Ernie Turner, representing the school’s Task Force; diocesan School Superintendent Mary Baier and Associate Superintendent Debbie Duane; architects Nancy Dougherty and Theodora Boyadjis of Studio 1200, the building’s designers; a representative of the project’s landscape architect; Michele Baggett and Heather Powers of the HSA. Dougherty is a former school parent, Doyle said.“Today, just about half of our schools from the 1960s remain open. Finances are a challenge. But the crisis facing our Catholic schools is deeper. Religion has been driven from the public forum and tragically, it has lost much influence even in private life. Even among the faithful, Catholic truths, values and observances are watered down or diminished in our secular culture,” Bishop Serratelli said during the ceremony. “In this context, your investment as a parish in maintaining a school is a sign of hope. Today’s groundbreaking for this new addition is a bold act of courage on your part against the tide of our modern secularist Zeitgeist,” he said.

The expansion of St. Vincent’s that now necessitates the new addition started in 2009, when the school reopened the sixth grade, followed by the re-establishment of its seventh and eighth grades in 2010. For that, the school hired new teachers, who put in place interdisciplinary approaches and state-of-the-art technology, all designed to challenge today’s students, and bought laptops to open new possibilities for learning. St. Vincent’s made room on its lower level for seventh-grade homeroom, an eighth-grade homeroom, an art and music room and a science lab. Originally, the school closed the middle-school grades in the early 1990s, because of declining enrolment.Doyle remembers parents approaching her back in the late 2000s, asking to re-establish the middle school.

“Expansion turned out to be a big challenge that made the middle school four times larger,” said Sister Noreen, who added that St. Vincent now educates 40 students in eighth grade, 35 in seventh grade and 46 in sixth grade.“The middle-school students have some of their classes in the meeting rooms in the parish center, making it difficult for them to get back to their other classes in the school,” she said.

The revitalized St. Vincent Martyr School goes hand in hand with “Envision: Planning Our Parish Future,” a process that has enabled the faithful to help chart a new vision — a new future — for the parish and implement an ambitious plan to inspire this already vibrant faith community to expand further its reach in spreading the “Good News” of the Gospel.

“‘Envision’ has allowed us to look at the entire parish an school — what’s good and where we still need to grow. It also gives everyone accountability,” Msgr. Hundt told The Beacon in 2011. He had initiated Envision several months after Bishop Serratelli appointed him pastor in January 2009.

Msgr. Hundt credited Sister Noreen and St. Vincent’s staff and faculty for staffing a school that consistently delivers a “value-based education.”

“St. Vincent Martyr School is thriving,” Msgr. Hundt said. “We have a school population that believes in the value of Catholic education — and that brings forth success,” Msgr. Hundt said.

Read the full article at http://www.evergreeneditions.com/article/Bishop+Helps+St.+Vincent+Martyr+School+In+Madison+Break+Ground+On+%242m+Additio/2364432/286925/article.html.

Pro-Lifers In Diocese Prepare For Annual March For Life

Cecile San Agustin

A day of sacrifice, spiritual prayer and visible witness

CLIFTON What does the March for Life mean to you? For some, it means protesting the sin of abortion.For others, it’s standing together in solidarity with other likeminded pro-lifers to be a voice for the voiceless in the womb.

Whatever the reason for attending the March for Life, thousands from the Paterson Diocese are gearing up to head to Washington,D. C. on Friday, Jan. 22 and join tens of thousands more from around the United States and abroad to promote life.

Father Michael Rodak, pastor of Our Lady Queen of Peace in West Milford and diocesan pilgrimage director, considers the March for Life a day of sacrifice, spiritual prayer and the visible witness of people who are truly concerned about life in the womb. “Attending the March shows that there are people really concerned about human life, especially the life of the unborn,” he said. “We are saying we really do care about the innocent lives and about our future.Abortion not only destroys a life, it destroys a generation.”

With many anti-abortion advocates claiming being pro-life is anti- woman, the March for Life theme reminds everyone that the pro-life message is very supportive of women. The theme this year is “Pro-life and Pro-Woman Go Hand in Hand.”

Father Rodak said, “This is something we do have to be mindful of when we March. Being prolife supports motherhood and we are actually honoring the Blessed Mother, who is an important part of salvation history through the birth of her son, Jesus. We need to celebrate this.”

The March for Life takes place every year on a weekday on or around the anniversary of the Supreme Court decision, Roe v. Wade, which made abortion legal on Jan. 22, 1973. The March be- gins with a rally at noon on the National Mall followed immediate- ly by the March down Constitution Avenue to the Supreme Court building on Capitol Hill. At the Supreme Court building at approximately at 3 p.m., marchers can listen to Silent No More testimonies from those who have been deeply affected by their abortions. Afterward, participants are encouraged to meet with members of Congress to advocate for life.

As early as 6 a.m. buses will leave from locations all over the diocese in Passaic, Morris and Sussex counties for the five-hour bus trip to Washington [see list of buses on this page]. Many parishes will also offer participants the opportunity to attend Mass before the trip as spiritual preparation for the March itself. On the day of the March in Washington, Father Rodak will celebrate Mass at St. Peter Church on Capitol Hill, located at 313 Second Street at 12:05 p.m. This Mass has traditionally brought together the participants from Paterson Diocese prior to the start of the March for Life.

Dr. Mary Mazzarella, consultant for the Diocesan Respect Life Office and a retired pediatrician, believes life advocates need to continue to take a stand and give witness that they are pro-life. The March for Life is about getting the pro-life message out, she said. “Between 2010 and 2013 there has been a 12 percent decline in the number of abortions,” she said. “It is believed this is due to mothers choosing life. I am sure this decision has been due to the use of the ultrasound to view the baby’s eyes, hands and feet. No longer can they be told that a baby is just a ‘blob of tissue.’”

Although more than 40 years have passed since abortion was made legal, Dr. Mazzarella believes the tide is changing to a pro-life society because of young people.“They are taking a pro-life stand in high school and colleges and participate in the March for Life, no matter what the weather.The largest groups of participants for the annual March are students,” she said.“For the past few years, social media has played a significant role in spreading the pro-life message with many young people sharing images from the March.”

Father Rodak said, “This is one of the largest, if not the largest demonstration that takes place in our nation’s capital. This is something that people should want to be a part of. It’s a day of spirituality and prayer. That’s the greatest thing, this is not just a day of protest.”

Read the full article at http://www.evergreeneditions.com/article/Pro-Lifers+In+Diocese+Prepare+For+Annual+March+For+Life/2364438/286925/article.html.

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