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The Beacon Beacon_February 25 2016 : Page 1

ALL CHURCHES OPEN MONDAYS FOR CONFESSIONS DURING LENT FROM 7 TO 8:30 P.M. SUSSEX PASSAIC THE AWARDWINNING NEWSPAPER OF THE R.C. DIOCESE OF PATERSON, N.J. MORRIS FEBRUARY 25, 2016 The Catholic Center for Evangelization at Bayley-Ellard 8 5 Diocesan priests describe once-in-a-lifetime experience of being commissioned by Pope By MICHAEL WOJCIK NE WS EDIT OR M ISSIONARIES OF M ERCY FACULTY FROM DIOCESE TEACH CLASSES ON MERCY AT SETON HALL UNIVERSITY BISHOP MAKES PASTORAL VISIT TO LITTLE FALLS PARISH 10 8 11 12-13 14-20 DO NOT DELAY — TIME SENSITIVE NEWS W HAT T O D O Y OUTH V IEWPOINT C LASSIFIEDS CLIFTON Five diocesan priests expressed ex-citement over the once-in-a-lifetime experience of being able to bring the healing mercy of God home to the Paterson Diocese, after hav-ing joined 800 priests worldwide to be com-missioned as Missionaries of Mercy by Pope Francis on Ash Wednesday, in St. Peter’s Basilica, Rome. The Holy Father gave these priests the mandate to serve as preachers of mercy and hear confessions filled with mercy during this Jubilee Year of Mercy. The five priests also spoke about the delight in spending time in the warm and loving pres-ence of Pope Francis. They attended an audi-ence with him in the Sala Regia of the Vatican’s Apo stolic Palace on the day before the commis-We were made sioning and then so keenly aware concelebrated Ash Wednesday Mass of the frater nity with him on the that we share in next day. During these events, many Christ and of of them also expe-how blessed we rienced the joy of shaking the Holy are to be priests Father’s hand for – instruments of the first time — marking for some, God’s great their first time meeting a Pope. mercy.” “I was nervous — F ATHER G ENO S YLVA and excited to shake the Pope’s hand. It was a wonderful thing,” said Msgr. John Hart, pastor of Assumption Parish, Morristown, and a Missionary of Mercy, who had met St. John Paul II at a papal audience in 1990. “It was a beautiful experience being in the presence of the Vicar of Christ.” The other diocesan priests who traveled to Rome were: Father Paul Manning, executive director of St. Paul Inside the Walls: the Diocesan Center for Evangelization at Bayley-Ellard, Madison, and diocesan vicar for evange-lization; Father Dariusz Kaminski, pastor of St. Stephen Parish, Paterson; and Father Jhon Madrid, parochial vicar of St. Thomas the CATHOLIC NEWS AGENCY PHOTO | ALEXEY GOTOVSKIY “ Father Paul Manning, diocesan vicar for evangelization and executive director of St. Paul Inside the Walls: the Diocesan Center for Evangelization, Madison, takes part in the procession of 800 priests from around the world to St. Peter’s Basilica in Rome Feb. 9 for an audience with Pope Francis. He, along with four other diocesan priests, was among the 800 priests commissioned by Pope Francis as Missionaries of Mercy on Ash Wednesday, Feb. 10. Rockaway Parish couple gives tips on best ways to build a ‘couples ministry’ By MICHAEL WOJCIK NE WS EDIT OR MADISON What Catholic couple — or any person — doesn’t like to have fun socializ-ing and having laughs with friends and neighbors, while playing games, eating food, singing, dancing or watching football? Everyone likes a great get-together — just the type of activity that can attract Catholic couples of all ages to a parish or local couples ministry, especially when pro-moted using fun titles, such as “St. Pat’s Beer, Burgers and Bonding,” “Pot Luck Praise” and “Surfin’ Turfin’ V-Day Mass.” But, as those names suggest, these events also include opportunities for participants to deepen their faith and relationships with God and each other, to worship and to be-come better spouses and parents in their faith journey. Offering this suggestion and others for starting a couples ministry was Mike and Faith Rose, a married couple from Sacred Heart Parish, Rockaway. They spoke Feb. 17 about “Building a Couples Ministry” at St. Paul Inside the Walls: the Diocesan Center for Evangelization at Bayley-Ellard here. “Some couples are turned off by a word like ‘ministry.’ So don’t invite them to an event with the word ‘ministry’ in the name. They are more likely to get involved with an activity that has a non-threatening name like ‘Super Bowl: Faith, Food and Football.’ That is something that they would be do-ing anyway, so we are capitalizing on it,” said Mike Rose, who along with Faith, spoke about their two-year-old outreach — not affiliated with any local parish — which meets once monthly in their Rockaway home. That evening, the Roses, young adults, who have been married 10 years and are expecting their fifth child in August, spoke about their couples ministry, which pro-vides a relaxed community atmosphere, where couples socialize and pray with and COUPLES MINISTRY on 5 MISSIONARIES on 4

Diocesan Priests Describe Once-In-A-Lifetime Experience Of Being Commissioned By Pope

Michael Wojcik

CLIFTON Five diocesan priests expressed excitement over the once-in-a-lifetime experience of being able to bring the healing mercy of God home to the Paterson Diocese, after having joined 800 priests worldwide to be commissioned as Missionaries of Mercy by Pope Francis on Ash Wednesday, in St. Peter’s Basilica, Rome. The Holy Father gave these priests the mandate to serve as preachers of mercy and hear confessions filled with mercy during this Jubilee Year of Mercy.

The five priests also spoke about the delight in spending time in the warm and loving presence of Pope Francis. They attended an audience with him in the Sala Regia of the Vatican’s Apo stolic Palace on the day before the commissioning and then concelebrated Ash Wednesday Mass with him on the next day. During these events, many of them also experienced the joy of shaking the Holy Father’s hand for the first time — marking for some, their first time meeting a Pope.

“I was nervous and excited to shake the Pope’s hand. It was a wonderful thing,” said Msgr. John Hart, pastor of Assumption Parish, Morristown, and a Missionary of Mercy, who had met St. John Paul II at a papal audience in 1990. “It was a beautiful experience being in the presence of the Vicar of Christ.”

The other diocesan priests who traveled to Rome were: Father Paul Manning, executive director of St. Paul Inside the Walls: the Diocesan Center for Evangelization at Bayley- Ellard, Madison, and diocesan vicar for evangelization; Father Dariusz Kaminski, pastor of St. Stephen Parish, Paterson; and Father Jhon Madrid, parochial vicar of St. Thomas the Apostle Parish, Oak Ridge, and St. John Vianney Parish, Stockholm. Father Geno Sylva, the English language official for the Pontifical Council for the Promotion of the New Evangelization, was already in Rome, because he serves at the Vatican which planned the commissioning events. Father Hernan Arias, vicar for pastoral care and pastor of St. Margaret of Scotland Parish, Morristown, and Father Stanley Barron, pastor of St. Elizabeth Ann Seton Parish, Flanders, have been designated as Missionaries of Mercy but did not travel to the Vatican for the commissioning.

Pope Francis called these Missionaries of Mercy to become “a living sign of the Father’s welcome to all those in search of his forgiveness,” according to the Pontifical Council’s website about the Jubilee Year of Mercy, at www.im.va.

“Our designation as Missionaries of Mercy is symbolic of Jubilee Year of Mercy and of the call for all priests to be missionaries of mercy,” Father Manning said.

About 800 of the more than 1,000 Missionaries of Mercy “were present here in Rome to receive personally from the Holy Father the mandate to be living signs of the Church’s maternal solicitude for the people of God,” Father Sylva said.

“All of us working in the Pontifical Council for the Promotion of the New Evangelization, the Curial Office responsible for the organization of all of the major initiatives and events of the Jubilee of Mercy, were inspired by the zeal, humility, and enthusiasm with which these priests received this important charge.” Father Sylva said. “Our Pontifical Council is looking forward to remaining in contact with each of the missionaries throughout the Jubilee.”

During the Tuesday audience, the Pope gave Father Manning lots of spiritual insights, during his reflection on the duties of a Missionary of Mercy.

“The Holy Father emphasized the need to offer mercy rather than judgment and to promote good will,” said Father Manning, who also shook the pontiff’s hand after the audience — his first time meeting a Pope. “I was speechless. I looked him in his eyes. I just shook his hand. I didn’t say anything. He didn’t either,” the priest said.

The papal audience showed the Holy Father to be “a kind shepherd, who had a frank desire to connect with us and spoke in a direct way,” Msgr. Hart said.

“The Pope spoke about the role of Missionaries of Mercy to help people reconcile with the Church,” said Msgr. Hart, who also took noted of his “warmth” and “wonderful smile” and spoke about his keen sense of humor. “When the Holy Father heard that the Missionaries of Mercy were going all around the world, including to Alaska, he told those missionaries to ‘bundle up,’ when they get home.”

Meanwhile, Father Silva ranks the procession that the Missionaries of Mercy made together in Rome as the “most significant and touching” experience of those Holy Year events. In a long line, they walked from Castel Sant’Angelo, down Via della Conciliazione, through the Piazza of St. Peter’s Square, to the Tomb of the Apostle Peter, past the relics of Saints Padre Pio and Leopoldo, and then into the Sala Regia of the Apostolic Palace for the meeting with the Holy Father.

“As we prayed and sang together, often in languages, we did not speak. There was a feeling of solidarity that came over all of us. We were made so keenly aware of the fraternity that we share in Christ and of how blessed we are to be priests — instruments of God’s great mercy,” Father Sylva said.

During the procession, the Missionaries of Mercy walked through the Holy Door of St. Peter’s, leading Msgr. Hart to imagine that moment when he will be able to “kiss the gates of Heaven” in eternity.

All the local priests expressed joy over concelebrating the Ash Wednesday Mass with the Holy Father. They received a purple stole for the Ash Wednesday Mass with Holy Year logo and a rolled-up document on parchment in Latin, declaring their new designation, Msgr. Hart said.

“It was a moving experience to be in the presence of the Holy Father at the Mass,” Msgr. Hart said.

Father Kaminski called the Mass and the other Holy Year events that week “an amazing experience being in Rome with the other priests who were all appointed for this special mission.” Soon after his trip to Rome, he traveled to his homeland of Poland to bestow that mercy on his mother and offer confessions as a Missionary of Mercy.

Father Kaminski, who had met St. John Paul II, recalled singing during the Ash Wednesday Mass the Hymn of Mercy, which St. Stephen’s parishioners have been singing regularly at Mass. The priest invited the diocese to attend a Mass on Divine Mercy Sunday, April 2 at noon in St. Stephen Church to be celebrated by Bishop Serratelli, who will commission four of the parish’s Eucharistic Mission - aries of Divine Mercy, who will consecrate themselves perpetually.

“The Pope was very spiritual. I was focused on the message that he was telling us,” Father Kaminski said. “I am blessed to experience so much love from God during this Jubilee Year of Mercy and this year of my 25th ordination anniversary.”

Read the full article at http://www.evergreeneditions.com/article/Diocesan+Priests+Describe+Once-In-A-Lifetime+Experience+Of+Being+Commissioned+By+Pope/2405552/291825/article.html.

Rockaway Parish Couple Gives Tips On Best Ways To Build A ‘Couples Ministry’

Michael Wojcik

MADISON What Catholic couple — or any person — doesn’t like to have fun socializing and having laughs with friends and neighbors, while playing games, eating food, singing, dancing or watching football?

Everyone likes a great get-together — just the type of activity that can attract Catholic couples of all ages to a parish or local couples ministry, especially when promoted using fun titles, such as “St. Pat’s Beer, Burgers and Bonding,” “Pot Luck Praise” and “Surfin’ Turfin’ V-Day Mass.” But, as those names suggest, these events also include opportunities for participants to deepen their faith and relationships with God and each other, to worship and to become better spouses and parents in their faith journey. Offering this suggestion and others for starting a couples ministry was Mike and Faith Rose, a married couple from Sacred Heart Parish, Rockaway. They spoke Feb. 17 about “Building a Couples Ministry” at St. Paul Inside the Walls: the Diocesan Center for Evangelization at Bayley-Ellard here.

“Some couples are turned off by a word like ‘ministry.’ So don’t invite them to an event with the word ‘ministry’ in the name. They are more likely to get involved with an activity that has a non-threatening name like ‘Super Bowl: Faith, Food and Football.’ That is something that they would be doing anyway, so we are capitalizing on it,” said Mike Rose, who along with Faith, spoke about their two-year-old outreach — not affiliated with any local parish — which meets once monthly in their Rockaway home.

That evening, the Roses, young adults, who have been married 10 years and are expecting their fifth child in August, spoke about their couples ministry, which provides a relaxed community atmosphere, where couples socialize and pray with and learn from like-minded couples, who ultimately build more joyful marriages, raise more Christ-like children and build families who will benefit the Church throughout the world. This dynamic grassroots outreach, which includes Catholic couples from many nearby parishes, has been growing by word of mouth and by personal invitation, said Mike Rose, who speaks at parishes and other groups about chastity, pro-life, manhood, fatherhood and family.

“Couples ministry is the most effective way that the Church can ensure that couples stay together. It gives them life skills so that their marriages can survive. It helps them make sure that Jesus is at the center of their marriages and families. It also provides an opportunity to make disciples,” said Faith Rose, a stay-at-home mother, who home-schools her children. “Couples ministry helps make us good spouses and kids. Our couples say that it’s such a blessing,” she said.

With the assistance of a slide presentation, the Roses offered the following suggestions about starting a couples ministry:

• Be creative. The Roses have held get-togethers for the Super Bowl, St. Patrick’s Day and Christmas and have hosted game nights, wine-and-cheese nights and even something that resulted from “out-of-the-box” thinking: ballroom dancing lessons. All their meetings start with casual meet and greet. Also, they hold events like a coffee house for the women and a poker night for the men to give the women and men opportunities to bond separately as women and men, Mike Rose said.

• Don’t forget God. The Rose’s events also include a “focused session,” which might include a faith-formation lesson or discussion of a topic relevant to family life. They make time for prayer, such as the rosary, Lectio Divina or one-on-one intimate prayer — sometimes aided by playing music or passing around a candle, he said. The Roses combine fun activities, such as a St. Valentine’s Day dinner with a Mass in their home, which is celebrated by one of their many priest friends. Some events take on an entirely reverent tone, such as their Holy Thursday Seder Service.

• ‘Check in’ with participating couples. Get to know about their journeys in their family relationships and walk with the Lord. Many engaged and married couples approach the Roses with difficult questions, seeking Church truths and advice on topics that they might be timid about broaching with a priest or even secular friends, Faith Rose said.

• Remember the “little ones.” Include children in many of the spiritual and social activities of the couples ministry. For those events designated exclusively for the adults, give the children a separate activity in another room or hire a babysitter, she said.

• Invite all couples, including those that are older or younger; those who are married, engaged or discerning marriage; and those who have or do not have children.

“Discerning and engaged couples want to see married couples in love with each other and the Lord. Likewise, young couples help re-energize the relationships of older couples,” said Mike Rose, co-owner and executive vice president of The Diversified Companies, a marketing organization that helps low-income seniors. “Our couples learn from each other and learn ways to help one another.”

• Ask what couples want from couples ministry. These questions could include, “Would you come to an event like this?“ “What day would be best to meet?” and “What topics would you like to cover?” Schedule events that fulfill the needs of the group, Mike Rose said.

• Be flexible and understanding. Many couples will decline your invitation to an event. Others will say “yes” and back out. Others will attend an event and never return. A few couples will form the core of the group, Faith Rose said. Leaders of the couples ministry have to be flexible, when their best-laid plans can go awry. Once, the Roses scheduled a ballroom dancing session, only to have couples cancel one by one. So, they switched the activity to a game night, Mike Rose said.

• You cannot do couples ministry alone — not as a wife, husband, couple or group of couples, but only with the Lord, Faith Rose said.

After the Roses’ presentation, Cindy Costello of St. Thomas the Apostle Parish, Sandyston, a married mother of five who is Marriage Ministry Coordinator in Family Life ministry at St. Paul’s, told the couple, “What you are doing — the Holy Spirit has inspired you. You are lighting fires and those fires are burning here tonight.”

Read the full article at http://www.evergreeneditions.com/article/Rockaway+Parish+Couple+Gives+Tips+On+Best+Ways+To+Build+A+%E2%80%98Couples+Ministry%E2%80%99/2405554/291825/article.html.

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