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The Beacon The Beacon March 3 2016 : Page 1

A LL C HUR C HE S OPEN MOND A Y S FOR C ONFE SS ION S DURING LENT FROM 7 TO 8:30 P.M. SUSSEX PASSAIC THE A W A RDWINNING NEW S P A PER OF THE R. C . DIO C E S E OF P A TER S ON, N.J. MORRIS MARCH 3, 2016 G IVING P RAISE TO THE L ORD IN S ONG The Catholic Center for Evangelization at Bayley-Ellard ‘M ERCY B Y T HE M INUTE ’ St. Paul Inside the Walls presents Jubilee Year of Mercy videos on website By MICHAEL WOJCIK NE WS EDIT OR 11 6 CA MPU S MINI S TRY S ERIE S S EEK S TO DEEPEN S TUDENT S ’ F A ITH C ORPU S C HRI S TI P A RI S H HONOR S C OUPLE ON 70 YE A R S OF M A RRI A GE 9 11 12-13 14-20 BEACON PHOTO | JOE GIGLI Men, who are part of the music ministry at Our Lady of Mount Carmel Parish in Boonton, lead the congregation in song during the vigil Mass marking the Third Sunday of Lent. Bishop Serratelli celebrated the Mass during his pastoral visit to the parish Feb. 27. For more photos, see page 2. 10 S T. PAUL INSIDE THE WALLS Y OUTH W HAT T O D O V IEWPOINT C LASSIFIEDS Series reacquaints faithful with ‘basics’ of their faith By MICHAEL WOJCIK NE WS EDIT OR DO NOT DELAY — TIME SENSITIVE NEWS MADISON Catholics use sacramentals all the time in their faith lives, even if they do not re-alize it — whether we say prayers, sing hymns, light candles, receive ashes on Ash Wednesday, wear religious medals or pray with the help of devotionals, such as the rosary, or devotional objects, such as prayer cards, crucifixes or pieces of religious art. That’s what Father Paul Manning, executive director of St. Paul Inside the Walls: the Diocesan Center for Evangelization at Bayley-Ellard here, told enthusiastic and curious Catholics on Feb. 27 during “Ashes, Palms, Lilies and Mangers (Celebrations and Sacramentals),” the latest session in his ongoing series at the center, called “Catholicism from Scratch.” The presenter, who also serves as diocesan Vicar for Evangelization, called sacra-mentals “outward signs that bear a resemblance to Sacraments and get us spiritually ready to receive the Sacraments and the grace of God which is a share in God’s own life.” “Sacramentals encourage us to be open to God and strengthen the grace that we receive in the Sacraments, so that we can live our Baptism more fully to live Christian lives,” said Father Manning, during the Saturday-morning session in one of the center’s classrooms that was filled with faithful. “Sacramentals encour-age us to get serious about our Christianity, for we are all called to make the world holy, speak God’s Word and lead others to God.” Although the words sound similar, sacra-mentals differ greatly from the seven Sacraments, which “are efficacious signs of grace, instituted by Christ and entrusted to the Church, by which divine life is dispensed to us…[and] bear fruit in those who receive them with the required dispositions,” states “The Catechism of the Catholic Church,” 131. They “do what they signify” — dispense grace by the action of God and the work that the priest per-forms — independently of our own participa-tion or power, although we have to be open to SERIES on 5 MADISON Mercy can take a minute or even less — to receive it, to give it or, in some in-stances, to get a clearer understanding of it. And it only takes a minute or two for Catholics in the Paterson Diocese and beyond to learn more about the infinite mercy of God — and about the universal Church’s Jubilee Year of Mercy — by watching one of several short videos in a new ongoing series, “Mercy by the Minute.” The videos show Bishop Serratelli and other faithful giving infor-mal individual reflections about the Holy Year, vari-ous aspects of the Lord’s mercy or personal stories of forgiveness. Viewers can look at any or all the videos at www.insidethe-walls.org, the website of St. Paul Inside the Walls: the Diocesan Center for Evangelization at Bayley-Ellard, which has been producing and posting them. Each week, “Mercy by the Minute” presents a new one-to two-minute video that features a Catholic presenting mercy in miniature: a short and easy-to-understand meditation on mercy. St. Paul’s posted the first video by Father Paul Manning, diocesan vicar for evangelization and the center’s executive director, on Dec. 8, the day when Pope Francis officially opened the Jubilee Year of Mercy. The second episode pres-ents Bishop Serratelli, who calls the Holy Year “very, very important, because it’s an extraordi-nary time to focus on one particular aspect of what our faith teaches and that aspect is the heart of the Gospel.” The Bishop speaks about God’s mercy at the center of Luke’s Gospel, found in such parables as The Prodigal Son, The Lost Coin and The Lost Sheep. “It’s all about the mercy of God. There are so MERCY on 3

Series Reacquaints Faithful With ‘Basics’ Of Their Faith

Michael Wojcik

MADISON Catholics use sacramentals all the time in their faith lives, even if they do not realize it — whether we say prayers, sing hymns, light candles, receive ashes on Ash Wednesday, wear religious medals or pray with the help of devotionals, such as the rosary, or devotional objects, such as prayer cards, crucifixes or pieces of religious art.

That’s what Father Paul Manning, executive director of St. Paul Inside the Walls: the Diocesan Center for Evangelization at Bayley- Ellard here, told enthusiastic and curious Catholics on Feb. 27 during “Ashes, Palms, Lilies and Mangers (Celebrations and Sacramentals),” the latest session in his ongoing series at the center, called “Catholicism from Scratch.” The presenter, who also serves as diocesan Vicar for Evangelization, called sacramentals “outward signs that bear a resemblance to Sacraments and get us spiritually ready to receive the Sacraments and the grace of God which is a share in God’s own life.”

“Sacramentals encourage us to be open to God and strengthen the grace that we receive in the Sacraments, so that we can live our Baptism more fully to live Christian lives,” said Father Manning, during the Saturday-morning session in one of the center’s classrooms that was filled with faithful. “Sacramentals encourage us to get serious about our Christianity, for we are all called to make the world holy, speak God’s Word and lead others to God.”

Although the words sound similar, sacramentals differ greatly from the seven Sacraments, which “are efficacious signs of grace, instituted by Christ and entrusted to the Church, by which divine life is dispensed to us…[and] bear fruit in those who receive them with the required dispositions,” states “The Catechism of the Catholic Church,” 131. They “do what they signify” — dispense grace by the action of God and the work that the priest performs — independently of our own participation or power, although we have to be open to God for them to “bear fruit,” Father Manning said.

“The seven Sacraments are the crux of Catholicism, most especially the Eucharist. Baptism is the door that welcomes us into the house of faith, but it’s the Eucharist that gives us a seat at the table,” Father Manning said. “Baptism begins our life in Christ, but that life will starve and die if it is not fed. Our spiritual life is fed with the grace of the Sacraments,” he said.

Unlike the Sacraments, sacramentals are “sacred signs instituted by the Church” that “prepare men to receive the fruit of the Sacraments and sanctify different circumstances of life,” states the Catechism, 1677. Also, Catholics need to be open to God for sacramentals to be effective from the outset. Sacramentals also include blessings, consecrations, dedications, and exorcisms, Father Manning said.

The Catholic tradition of using sacramentals finds its roots in the Incarnation, the mystery of God becoming man. At that time, “the physical and the earthly have become vehicles of the spiritual and the heavenly” and “physical objects and human actions have the potential to become occasions of grace.” In John 9: 6-12, Jesus heals a blind man by spitting on the ground, mixing his saliva with clay, applying it to the man’s eyes and telling him to wash it off, the priest said.

“Jesus used earthly things to indicate and communicate divine realities,” Father Manning said.

During the two-hour-long “Catholicism from Scratch” sessions, Father Manning encourages audience members to ask questions, which on Feb. 27 included more detailed inquires about grace and the Sacraments. Now in its third year, the course runs on a two-year cycle and “presents the basics of the Catholic faith as a ‘brush-up’ for those who missed it the first time around or those who never heard it before,” the priest said.

The second half of Father Manning’s presentation on Feb. 27 focused on the Liturgical Year in the Church. The Scripture readings follow a three-year cycle with a focus now on Luke, but, in other years, feature Matthew and Mark. We usually hear John during Lent and Advent. Different colors of vestments and the worship space signify different liturgical seasons, such as white for Easter and Christmas, green for the Epiphany and Pentecost and violet for Advent and Lent, Father Manning said.

“Holy Mother Church believes that she should celebrate the saving work of her divine spouse in a sacred commemoration on certain days throughout the course of the year. Once each week, on the day, which she has called the Lord’s Day, she keeps the memory of the Lord’s Resurrection. She also celebrates it once every year, together with his blessed Passion, at Easter, that most solemn of all feasts,” said Father Manning, quoting the Catechism, 1163. “In the course of the year, moreover, she unfolds the whole mystery of Christ…Thus recalling the mysteries of the redemption, she opens up to the faithful the riches of her Lord’s powers and merits, so that these are in some way made present in every age; the faithful lay hold of them and are filled with saving grace.”

The current “Catholicism from Scratch” series began in September and has explored “Who Says? (The Bible, Tradition and the Church),” “Three, Two, One (Trinity, Incarnation and Sanctification)” and “Stairway to Heaven (The Last Things).” Upcoming sessions will examine “Outside In and Inside Out (The Sacraments)” on March 19, “Into Your Hands (Sacraments of Vocation) on April 16 and “All in Order (The Hierarchy)” on May 14. Sessions run from 10 a.m. to noon on those designated Saturdays.

After the latest session, Bob Scirocco of Holy Family Parish, Florham Park, told The Beacon that he has been attending “Catholic from Scratch” from the beginning.

“Father Paul is a wealth of information and knowledge,” Scirocco said. “Everything that I didn’t learn in the Catholic school, I’m learning now. Among those many things, I learned how Catholicism relates to the Bible and how everything at Mass — like the prayers — has a basis in the Bible. It has made me appreciate Mass much more,” he said.

[Information: (973) 377-1004 or www.insidethewalls.org.]

Read the full article at http://www.evergreeneditions.com/article/Series+Reacquaints+Faithful+With+%E2%80%98Basics%E2%80%99+Of+Their+Faith/2414935/292653/article.html.

‘Mercy By The Minute’

Michael Wojcik

St. Paul Inside the Walls presents Jubilee Year of Mercy videos on website

MADISON Mercy can take a minute or even less — to receive it, to give it or, in some instances, to get a clearer understanding of it.

And it only takes a minute or two for Catholics in the Paterson Diocese and beyond to learn more about the infinite mercy of God — and about the universal Church’s Jubilee Year of Mercy — by watching one of several short videos in a new ongoing series, “Mercy by the Minute.” The videos show Bishop Serratelli and other faithful giving informal individual reflections about the Holy Year, various aspects of the Lord’s mercy or personal stories of forgiveness. Viewers can look at any or all the videos at www.insidethewalls. org, the website of St. Paul Inside the Walls: the Diocesan Center for Evangelization at Bayley-Ellard, which has been producing and posting them.

Each week, “Mercy by the Minute” presents a new one- to two-minute video that features a Catholic presenting mercy in miniature: a short and easy-to-understand meditation on mercy. St. Paul’s posted the first video by Father Paul Manning, diocesan vicar for evangelization and the center’s executive director, on Dec. 8, the day when Pope Francis officially opened the Jubilee Year of Mercy. The second episode presents Bishop Serratelli, who calls the Holy Year “very, very important, because it’s an extraordinary time to focus on one particular aspect of what our faith teaches and that aspect is the heart of the Gospel.”

The Bishop speaks about God’s mercy at the center of Luke’s Gospel, found in such parables as The Prodigal Son, The Lost Coin and The Lost Sheep.

“It’s all about the mercy of God. There are so many aspects of our faith, but when we concentrate on what’s essential, it makes the year overflow with grace,” says Bishop Serratelli, who concludes his video with the words of Jesus: “ ‘Be merciful as your Father is merciful’ — as God loves us and is merciful to us. When we realize His love for us, it becomes very easy to share in that mercy with others,” he said.

In another video, Father Pawel Tomczyk, a St. Paul’s faculty member, stands outside the center to speak about the Sacrament of Reconciliation. He recounts the passage in the Acts, when King Herod jails Peter for speaking about Jesus. An angel appears to the Apostle in a bright light. The shackles and chains fall to the ground. Then, the angel leads Peter out of the prison, the priest says.

“This is what the celebration of the Sacrament [of Reconciliation] is all about. It’s about losing our chains and setting us free, so we can be free to love other people,” Father Tomczyk says. “People do not come to Confession because maybe, down deep, they are fearful. But Jesus comes to you and to me today and says ‘Don’t be afraid.’ Perhaps it’s been quite a while since you’ve been to Confession. And maybe that is a good time to go back…and to tell Jesus, ‘Yes, I want to love you back and be in that loving relationship.’ If we only had that awareness about how much God loves us, we would not be afraid,” he said.

Presenting mercy from a more personal perspective is Deacon Thomas Gibbons of Our Lady of the Mountain Parish, Long Valley, who serves as assistant director of the diocesan Permanent Diaconate. He speaks about his life 37 years ago, when he was a successful man in his early 40s, who allowed his social drinking “to progress to an obsession.” With God’s mercy and the guidance of his pastor at the time, he joined Alcoholics Anonymous (AA) and stopped drinking, he says.

“I reformed my life and became the man, the husband, the father and the employee I should have been all that time,” says Deacon Gibbons, who noted that he joined a more spiritually centered group, in addition to AA. “This group restructured my spirituality. I developed a new relationship with God. I learned how to communicate with God. [Later], I became a deacon,” he says.

Other “Mercy by the Minute” videos available feature a Franciscan priest and a layman, who provided music for St. Paul’s Rite of Christian Initiation of Adults retreat. This week’s episode spotlights Monique Caron, co-minister to young adults, ages 23-39 at St. Paul’s. Upcoming episodes will feature other Catholics, such as Daniel Ferrari, Caron’s co-minister. These shorts have been designed to attract the attention of young people, who spend considerable time online and might share this faithbased content on social media websites, such as FaceBook, said Caitlin Fitzgerald, St. Paul’s communications and information coordinator, who produced the videos.

“These videos are casual presentations that show regular Catholics, who are easily accessible and easily understandable,” Fitzgerald said.

The first video in the series shows Father Manning, giving an overview of the Jubilee Year of Mercy. Pope Francis hopes that, during this Holy Year, “the Church and all her believers will experience the Lord’s mercy in their own lives, will give witness in their belief in the Lord’s mercy by being joyful and vocal Christians and will enact that mercy through the Spiritual and Corporal Works of Mercy,” the priest says, sitting in his office at St. Paul’s.

“We can become focused on our weaknesses, our flaws, our sinfulness or on our failure to live the Christian life the way we want to and forget that the Father is merciful toward us and has given us the loving heart of Jesus for us to be in relationship with Him,” Father Manning says. “I think that it [the Jubilee Year of Mercy] is important, because it reminds us that we need mercy and have we got it.”

[To view the videos, go to: www.insidethewalls.org, and then to “Mercy by the Minute” on the Year of Mercy page.]

Read the full article at http://www.evergreeneditions.com/article/%E2%80%98Mercy+By+The+Minute%E2%80%99/2414936/292653/article.html.

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