Background Image

The Beacon The Beacon March 31 2016 : Page 1

5 ST. ROSE PARISHIONER HELPS THOSE AFFECTED BY UKRAINE CONFLICT SUSSEX PASSAIC THE AWARDWINNING NEWSPAPER OF THE R.C. DIOCESE OF PATERSON, N.J. MORRIS MARCH 31, 2016 A D IOCESAN F IRST The Catholic Center for Evangelization at Bayley-Ellard 16 2 Drone eyes exterior of Paterson church as part of inspection for needed repairs By MICHAEL WOJCIK NE WS EDIT OR BISHOP CELEBRATES ANNUAL CHRISM MASS PATERSON What’s that flying object gliding through the air between the tops of the two tall towers of Our Lady of Lourdes (OLL) Church here? Is it a PRESIDES 14 BISHOP AT EASTER VIGIL 8 11 12-13 16 17-24 DO NOT DELAY — TIME SENSITIVE NEWS Y OUTH O BITUARIES V IEWPOINT W HAT T O D O C LASSIFIEDS FLYING MACHINE A drone snaps photos BEACON PHOTO | MICHAEL WOJCIK of the physical damage on the exterior of Our Lady of Lourdes Church in Paterson — part of an extensive inspection of the parish’s buildings that are in need of repairs. bat from the belfry? A bird? A tiny plane? Curious pedestrians stopped on a nearby sidewalk and looked up, while apartment dwellers across the street surveyed the scene from their porches on the morning of March 23. It took them a few minutes to identify the fly-ing object as a drone — an unmanned aerial vehicle set aloft by four pro-pellers. The drone, which looks like a small robot, snapped hundreds of pho-tographs with its camera of physical damage at the top and sides of the ma-jestic city church. It marked the first step in the Paterson Diocese’s efforts to make essential repairs to its well-worn brick exterior. “It’s great to see everything up there in the high spaces of the church in the photos,” said Scott Lurie, the architect the Diocese hired for the renovation project, as he looked at the pictures taken by Parker Gyokeres, the drone pi-lot and owner of the aerial drone pho-tography company, Propeller heads. “We originally were going to look at the DRONE on 9 JESUS CHRIST IS RISEN! Bishop Serratelli elevates Host during BEACON PHOTO | JOE GIGLI the Mass he celebrated on Easter, March 27, in St. Kateri Tekak -witha Church, Sparta. In the foreground near the altar is a statute of the Risen Christ. For more photos, please turn to page 15. Parishes to host celebrations for Divine Mercy Sunday By CECILE SAN AGUSTIN REPOR TER PATERSON As the Year of Mercy is celebrated by the universal Church, Divine Mercy Sunday this year takes on special meaning — reminding all no matter how lonely or sinful they are, they will never be forgotten by God. Throughout the diocese, parishes will be marking the feast of Divine Mercy Sunday, which is held on the Second Sunday of Easter. This year the feast will be on April 3 and will be marked with special holy hours, many near or around 3 p.m., which is considered the hour of Divine Mercy. The celebrations will in-clude the Sacrament of Reconciliation, Exposition of the Blessed Sacrament, Benediction and recitation of the Divine Mercy chaplet and the rosary. St. John Paul II inaugurated the annual feast to be observed on the Second Sunday of Easter as a day of devotion to Christ’s tender mercy for all humanity. He declared the day officially on April 30, 2000 when he canon-ized St. Faustina Kowlaska, the young Polish nun and visionary of Jesus as “divine mercy.” Bishop Serratelli will mark Divine Mercy Sunday at St. Joseph Parish here at noon April 3 with a tri-lingual Mass in English, Polish and Spanish con-celebrated with Father Dariusz Kaminski, pastor, who was born in Poland and grew up near the same town as Blessed Michael Sopocko, St. Faustina’s spiritual director. “In every church, the image of Divine Mercy was visible in my diocese (in Poland),” said Father Kaminski. “When I came to America, I always had special de-votion to Divine Mercy. When I became pastor at St. Stephen’s I thought it was important to have special hours for the devotion.” Father Kaminski has created many prayer opportunities for the faithful at the Paterson parish to Divine Mercy. On every first Friday, there are devotions in Spanish and on every third Friday in Polish. There’s also a special Divine Mercy image for families to bring home for the week. “Families are always very hap-py to welcome the image into their homes. They have said they’ve received many blessings and graces,” said Father Kaminski. At Annunciation Parish in Wayne, the Divine Mercy Sunday celebration, which will begin at 2 p.m. with confessions, has been held for 15 years and started with the late Msgr. Stanley Schinski, pastor emeritus. Msgr. Peter Doody, pastor of Annunciation, has continued the celebration of the feast and said it continues to grow every year. “We will have eight priests listening to confessions, which shows how much people desire God’s mercy. CELEBRATIONS on 4

A Diocesan First

Michael Wojcik

Drone eyes exterior of Paterson church as part of inspection for needed repairs

PATERSON What’s that flying object gliding through the air between the tops of the two tall towers of Our Lady of Lourdes (OLL) Church here? Is it a bat from the belfry? A bird? A tiny plane?

Curious pedestrians stopped on a nearby sidewalk and looked up, while apartment dwellers across the street surveyed the scene from their porches on the morning of March 23. It took them a few minutes to identify the flying object as a drone — an unmanned aerial vehicle set aloft by four propellers. The drone, which looks like a small robot, snapped hundreds of photographs with its camera of physical damage at the top and sides of the majestic city church. It marked the first step in the Paterson Diocese’s efforts to make essential repairs to its well-worn brick exterior.

“It’s great to see everything up there in the high spaces of the church in the photos,” said Scott Lurie, the architect the Diocese hired for the renovation project, as he looked at the pictures taken by Parker Gyokeres, the drone pilot and owner of the aerial drone photography company, Propeller heads. “We originally were going to look at the damage by putting up scaffolding around the church, which would have been costly and time-consuming and by bringing in a bucket lift, which would have been a great liability. This [the drone flight] saves time, money and liability,” he said.

Welcome to a new frontier for the diocesan Facilities Department: its first exterior building inspection by drone. The sevenpound, black-and-white Inspire 1 drone took more than 400 photos of deteriorating conditions of the sides and roof of OLL, as well as the rectory and the school — the result of years of deferred maintenance. For the first of several flights, the drone, which is registered with the Federal Aviation Administration, lifted off from parish parking lot as Gyokeres operated two joysticks on a small device that he held in his hands.

Like a graceful bird, the drone — with its green flashing lights and gentle whirl of its propellers — buzzed around each side of the church, which was built in 1928. Its camera captured large context photos and then follow-up shots that showed close-up detail of the exterior. Gyokeres piloted the drone by looking into a small screen mounted on the hand-held device. Often, the flying machine buzzed by one of the church’s sides and then idled in mid-air to take some detail shots.

“Parker, can you pick up the damage to the copper there? Can you get pictures of the intersecting corner here?” Lurie asked Gyokeres, while the drone flew between sections that connect the tower with the roof. Routinely, Gyokeres consulted with Lurie on which photos he needed to take.

After the unmanned aerial vehicle touched down for the first time, Gyokeres called over Lurie, Ben Dubbels, diocesan facilities project coordinator; and Father Benjamin William’s OLL’s pastor, to view the photos on his hand-held device. The drone made four flights around the church — one to cover each side — and took dramatic photos of physical damage.

The pictures revealed broken windows, cracks in the exterior of the building, a loose snow railing on the roof, grime between the bricks and evidence of water entering the church, among many of the preliminary findings. “Lurie will utilize these photos and other evidence to compile a report that prioritizes the work. Then, the Diocese will request bids for the project, which should begin sometime this year,” Dubbels said.

“This is aerial reconnaissance on a personal level. These pictures may not be glamorous, but they are very informative to my clients,” said Gyokeres, a retired U.S. Air Force photojournalist and former chief of public affairs, who has designed and built both multi-prop and fixed-wing aircraft.

After each flight at OLL, Gyokeres changed the battery in the drone, each one lasting about 20 minutes. Before liftoff, the safety-conscious pilot informed anyone in the immediate vicinity about potential hazards, such as the possibility of the drone’s GRS system failing or difficulty maintaining height or the presence of low-hanging wires and trees, construction debris, vehicles and curious onlookers. The drone also navigated strong winds that blew it several feet while in the air. “The Diocese previously postponed the flight from another scheduled day because of wind and rain,” Dubbels said.

It was Dubbels who suggested using a drone for the inspection of OLL during a meeting with Father Williams and members of the diocesan leadership team — a trend that has been generating considerable “buzz” in his industry. It costs $2,500 — far less than the roughly $30,000 for scaffolding. “The Facilities Department plans to correct only the most serious damage, not cosmetics. They include water leaks and damage to the brickwork and stonework that might compromise safety,” said Dennis Rodano, diocesan Business and Facilities project manager.

“This [drone flight] gives the architect a bird’s eye view of the project. It is also a cost savings,” Rodano said. “This is a test to see if it works. If it does, we might do this with other parishes in the future,” he said.

Father Williams said he enjoyed watching the drone land in the parking lot. Having served in the U.S. Air Force Reserves, the priest recalled watching much larger drones in the military lift off with even heavier payloads.

“I love the technology, but there is so much work to be done, because of deferred maintenance, and this is a poor parish. The bottom line is whatever it takes to get the job done,” Father Williams said.

Read the full article at http://www.evergreeneditions.com/article/A+Diocesan+First/2444186/296218/article.html.

Parishes To Host Celebrations For Divine Mercy Sunday

Cecile San Agustin

PATERSON As the Year of Mercy is celebrated by the universal Church, Divine Mercy Sunday this year takes on special meaning — reminding all no matter how lonely or sinful they are, they will never be forgotten by God.

Throughout the diocese, parishes will be marking the feast of Divine Mercy Sunday, which is held on the Second Sunday of Easter. This year the feast will be on April 3 and will be marked with special holy hours, many near or around 3 p.m., which is considered the hour of Divine Mercy. The celebrations will include the Sacrament of Reconciliation, Exposition of the Blessed Sacrament, Benediction and recitation of the Divine Mercy chaplet and the rosary.

St. John Paul II inaugurated the annual feast to be observed on the Second Sunday of Easter as a day of devotion to Christ’s tender mercy for all humanity. He declared the day officially on April 30, 2000 when he canonized St. Faustina Kowlaska, the young Polish nun and visionary of Jesus as “divine mercy.”

Bishop Serratelli will mark Divine Mercy Sunday at St. Joseph Parish here at noon April 3 with a tri-lingual Mass in English, Polish and Spanish concelebrated with Father Dariusz Kaminski, pastor, who was born in Poland and grew up near the same town as Blessed Michael Sopocko, St. Faustina’s spiritual director.

“In every church, the image of Divine Mercy was visible in my diocese (in Poland),” said Father Kaminski. “When I came to America, I always had special devotion to Divine Mercy. When I became pastor at St. Stephen’s I thought it was important to have special hours for the devotion.”

Father Kaminski has created many prayer opportunities for the faithful at the Paterson parish to Divine Mercy. On every first Friday, there are devotions in Spanish and on every third Friday in Polish. There’s also a special Divine Mercy image for families to bring home for the week.

“Families are always very happy to welcome the image into their homes. They have said they’ve received many blessings and graces,” said Father Kaminski.

At Annunciation Parish in Wayne, the Divine Mercy Sunday celebration, which will begin at 2 p. m. with confessions, has been held for 15 years and started with the late Msgr. Stanley Schinski, pastor emeritus.

Msgr. Peter Doody, pastor of Annunciation, has continued the celebration of the feast and said it continues to grow every year. “We will have eight priests listening to confessions, which shows how much people desire God’s mercy. The faithful know we are here every year marking the day,” said Msgr. Doody. “With this year being the Year of Mercy, I think it’s going to be greatly attended.”

The Wayne parish has also hosted several events throughout the year to mark the Year of Mercy. Young people of the parish have been doing 30 days of acts of mercy for the local community. In May, the parish will have a retreat day on mercy at Delbarton in Morristown.

Our Lady of Pompeii in Paterson is also hosting Divine Mercy Sunday services at 3 p. m. with prayers, Exposition of the Blessed Sacrament, readings from St. Faustina’s diary and confessions. Father Frank Agresti, pastor, said, “When I served at my first parish, St. Peter the Aposlte in Parsippany, I was very impressed by the people’s devotion and the need for God’s mercy. To me, there’s nothing like the Sacrament of Reconcili ation, which allows us to experience God’s mercy face-to-face.”

In addition to devotions on Divine Mercy Sunday, many parishes and the faithful pray the nine-day novena for Divine Mercy, which traditionally starts on Good Friday and ends on Divine Mercy Sunday. For each day of the novena a different intention is prayed for.

The novena intentions are for all mankind, especially sinners; the souls of priests and religious; all devout and faithful souls; those who do not believe in God and those that don’t know Jesus yet; the souls of those who have separated from the Church; the meek and humble souls and the souls of little children; the souls who especially venerate and glorify God’s mercy and the souls who are detained in purgatory.

The image of Divine Mercy, which depicts Jesus with rays radiating from his heart, is the earliest element of the devotion. On Feb. 22, 1931, Jesus appeared to St. Faustina in this way. During this visit, Jesus told the young saint to paint an image with what she saw and the signature: “Jesus, I trust in you.” In honor of this moment, parishes have an image of Divine Mercy blessed as a reminder of God’s salvation.

In addition, the Divine Mercy chaplet is recited. St. Faustina used rosary beads to say this prayer now proclaimed today. On the “Our Father” beads and the “Hail Mary” beads, prayers specific to Jesus’ mercy are said.

Father Kaminski said, “Pope Francis told the people, ‘Without God’s mercy, the world will not exist. We need God’s mercy in our relationship with God. When we know we are sinners, God is happy to forgive us. All our relationships should be based on mercy. We should not judge each other but show compassion and love to one another.”

Read the full article at http://www.evergreeneditions.com/article/Parishes+To+Host+Celebrations+For+Divine+Mercy+Sunday/2444195/296218/article.html.

Next Page


Publication List
Using a screen reader? Click Here