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The Beacon The Beacon April 7 2016 : Page 1

7 ‘FINANCIAL PEACE UNIVERSITY’ USES BIBLE TO TEACH BUDGETING SUSSEX PASSAIC THE AWARDWINNING NEWSPAPER OF THE R.C. DIOCESE OF PATERSON, N.J. MORRIS APRIL 7, 2016 D IVINE M ERCY S UNDAY By CECILE SAN AGUSTIN Bishop marks celebration at tri-lingual Mass in St. Stephen Church, Paterson The Catholic Center for Evangelization at Bayley-Ellard REPORTER 11 4 PATERSON With one of the most diverse com-BISHOP BLESSES, DEDICATES O’CONNOR HALL AT S&N 6 BISHOP ADMINISTERS SACRAMENT OF CONFIRMATION ON DIVINE MERCY SUNDAY 8-9 11 12-13 14 15-20 Y OUTH W HAT T O D O V IEWPOINT O BITUARIES C LASSIFIEDS DO NOT DELAY — TIME SENSITIVE NEWS munities in the Paterson Diocese, St. Stephen Parish here marked Divine Mercy Sunday with a tri-lingual Mass celebrated in English, Polish and Spanish April 3. The feast was designated by St. John Paul II and has taken place on the Second Sunday of Easter since 2001. It is based on the diaries of a young Polish nun named St. Faustina Kowlaska and her encounters with Jesus, who presented himself to her as Divine Mercy during the 1930s. Bishop Serratelli was main celebrant of the Mass with Father Dariusz Kaminski, pastor of St. Stephen’s, and several diocesan priests as concele-brants. They were wearing special vestments with the Jubilee Year of Mercy logo on them. Pope Francis an-nounced the extraordinary Holy Year of Mercy last year at the time of Divine Mercy Sunday because of people’s need for God’s mercy and compassion. The Jubilee Year of Mercy began on the Feast of the Im mac ulate Conception, Dec. 8, and will concluded on Nov. 20, 2016, the Feast of Christ the King. Father Kaminski has a special devotion to Divine Mercy. It started during his formative years in Poland where he was born. St. Stephen Parish honors the devotion to Divine Mercy year-round with holy hours twice a month, a pilgrim statue that travels from parishioners’ homes each week and with the Eucharistic Missionaries of the Divine Mercy. DIVINE MERCY SUNDAY At St. Stephen Church in Paterson, where Bishop Serratelli celebrated Mass for BEACON PHOTO | JOE GIGLI Divine Mercy Sunday April 3, the Bishop meets the Grinienko family, who will be taking home the Divine Mercy statue, a tradition at the parish. The statue travels from house to house every week and has brought many blessings to the families who have welcomed it to their homes, according to Father Dariusz Kaminski, pastor. At the start of the Divine Mercy Sunday Mass, three parishioners — one speaking in English, one in Polish and one in Spanish — thanked Bishop Serratelli for celebrating the feast of Divine Mercy with the St. Stephen’s community each year. Bishop Serratelli said, “I’m very happy to be here today for the celebration of this great feast of Divine Mercy. It’s become a tradition, which I treasure and I am grateful to Father Dariusz for inviting me. This community is so full of faith and you continue to celebrate this great feast with zeal.” In his homily, which he gave in both English and Spanish, the Bishop reflected on the day’s Gospel about St. Thomas, who doubted Jesus’ Resurrection until he could see DIVINE MERCY on 2 Filippini ministry provides help for young migrant mothers MICHAEL WOJCIK NEWS EDITOR MORRISTOWN What are the most in-demand items available at the tables manned by John Corr Family Resources volunteers at St. Margaret of Scotland Parish here? The hurried rush of needy clients toward two tables at its 10 a.m. opening on a re-cent Friday morning makes plain the answer: diapers, baby wipes and all kinds of soap, including those for the bath, babies, cloth-ing, counters and dishes. Located in the parish center be-low St. Margaret Church, the giv-ing tables have become so popular over its almost two years in opera-tion that they now serve from 70 to 100 people — mostly Hispanic migrants — on Friday mornings, when it is open. Many folding ta-bles and plastic bins overflow with donated items for these needy clients — many of them undocu-mented — to peruse and take, such as toys, household and baby products and clothing for babies, children and adults. John Corr Family Resources, a project of the Religious Teachers Filippini, estab-lished this ministry, which is staffed by religious sisters from the nearby Villa Walsh mother-house and lay volunteers, who consider the clients to be family. “I got my little girls shoes, so they can go to church all prettied up,” said Mary, a married mother of three small girls from Honduras, who also shopped on April 1 for baby wipes, diapers and soap — several of the items that the staff buys with monetary donations it receives. “My hus-band works, but I don’t work be-cause I’m raising three small chil-dren. It [shopping here] helps us get things that we can’t afford. It’s a blessing from God,” she said through a Spanish translator. That morning, clients sifted through clothes in bins and on ta-bles with help from the volun-teers — many fluent in Spanish — who later checked them out by placing their items in plastic MINISTRY on 5

Divine Mercy Sunday

Cecile San Agustin

Bishop marks celebration at trilingual Mass in St. Stephen Church, Paterson

PATERSON With one of the most diverse communities in the Paterson Diocese, St. Stephen Parish here marked Divine Mercy Sunday with a trilingual Mass celebrated in English, Polish and Spanish April 3. The feast was designated by St. John Paul II and has taken place on the Second Sunday of Easter since 2001. It is based on the diaries of a young Polish nun named St. Faustina Kowlaska and her encounters with Jesus, who presented himself to her as Divine Mercy during the 1930s.

Bishop Serratelli was main celebrant of the Mass with Father Dariusz Kaminski, pastor of St. Stephen’s, and several diocesan priests as concelebrants. They were wearing special vestments with the Jubilee Year of Mercy logo on them. Pope Francis announced the extraordinary Holy Year of Mercy last year at the time of Divine Mercy Sunday because of people’s need for God’s mercy and compassion. The Jubilee Year of Mercy began on the Feast of the I'm maculate Conception, Dec. 8, and will concluded on Nov. 20, 2016, the Feast of Christ the King.

Father Kaminski has a special devotion to Divine Mercy. It started during his formative years in Poland where he was born. St. Stephen Parish honors the devotion to Divine Mercy year-round with holy hours twice a month, a pilgrim statue that travels from parishioners’ homes each week and with the Eucharistic Missionaries of the Divine Mercy.

At the start of the Divine Mercy Sunday Mass, three parishioners — one speaking in English, one in Polish and one in Spanish — thanked Bishop Serratelli for celebrating the feast of Divine Mercy with the St. Stephen’s community each year.

Bishop Serratelli said, “I’m very happy to be here today for the celebration of this great feast of Divine Mercy. It’s become a tradition, which I treasure and I am grateful to Father Dariusz for inviting me. This community is so full of faith and you continue to celebrate this great feast with zeal.”

In his homily, which he gave in both English and Spanish, the Bishop reflected on the day’s Gospel about St. Thomas, who doubted Jesus’ Resurrection until he could see and feel the wounds of Jesus.

“The Risen Jesus appears on Easter Sunday night to his confused and questioning disciples,” the bishop said. “He appears a week later to doubting Thomas so unwilling to trust the witness of others. Thomas sees the wound of Jesus and his doubt is gone. He now believes and proclaims, ‘My Lord and my God,’ the greatest acclamation of faith in the entire Gospel of St. John. So often we hear this Gospel lament about Thomas and his doubt. And we rightly hear about our own doubt and our own inability to believe simply because someone else has told us. We recognize in Thomas our need to touch the wounds, to feel the presence of the Risen Lord for ourselves, so we can come to faith.”

“This is only one part of today’s Gospel event,” the Bishop said. “The other part deals not with Thomas and his faith but with Jesus and his love for us. Exalted by the Father as Lord of all, the crucified Jesus now rules all creation. He has been raised up but he has not been removed from us. He is not removed from the pain and sorrow that we feel. He cares for us when we are confused, when we are doubting and when we fail. There is no sorrow, no doubt, no fear or apprehension, no matter how small in the eyes of others, that Jesus does not see and care about because of the greatness of his mercy for us.”

At the Divine Mercy Sunday celebration, four women of the parish, who are members of the Eucharistic Missionaries of the Divine Mercy, made an act of perpetual consecration to God, Father of Mercy before Bishop Serratelli. The purpose of the Eucharistic Missionaries of the Divine Mercy is to share the message of Divine Mercy, to develop a special love for the presence of Jesus in the Eucharist, and to strive for sanctification in daily life.

At the close of Mass, Father Kaminski remembered Eva Serratelli, the Bishop’s mother, who passed away on April 27, 2014, which was the date Divine Mercy Sunday was marked that year.

Father Kaminski said, “When we would celebrate the feast of Divine Mercy the past years in our parish of St. Stephen’s, one thing for sure is that our Bishop would be with his beloved mother. Mrs. Eva Serratelli always had a seat in the first pew and there was always a person to take care of her. She is not with us physically anymore but we believe she is with us spiritually and sitting with us in the first pew in our church.”

Bishop Serratelli thanked the community and said, “I want to express my sincere gratitude for this community — for your faith and for your great devotion to the Divine Mercy of Jesus. I pray in the days ahead that the Lord always keep you united and be a force of faith in the community.”

Read the full article at http://www.evergreeneditions.com/article/Divine+Mercy+Sunday/2450552/297011/article.html.

Filippini Ministry Provides Help For Young Migrant Mothers

Michael Wojcik

MORRISTOWN What are the most in-demand items available at the tables manned by John Corr Family Resources volunteers at St. Margaret of Scotland Parish here? The hurried rush of needy clients toward two tables at its 10 a.m. opening on a recent Friday morning makes plain the answer: diapers, baby wipes and all kinds of soap, including those for the bath, babies, clothing, counters and dishes.

Located in the parish center below St. Margaret Church, the giving tables have become so popular over its almost two years in operation that they now serve from 70 to 100 people — mostly Hispanic migrants — on Friday mornings, when it is open. Many folding tables and plastic bins overflow with donated items for these needy clients — many of them undocumented — to peruse and take, such as toys, household and baby products and clothing for babies, children and adults. John Corr Family Resources, a project of the Religious Teachers Filippini, established this ministry, which is staffed by religious sisters from the nearby Villa Walsh motherhouse and lay volunteers, who consider the clients to be family.

“I got my little girls shoes, so they can go to church all prettied up,” said Mary, a married mother of three small girls from Honduras, who also shopped on April 1 for baby wipes, diapers and soap — several of the items that the staff buys with monetary donations it receives. “My husband works, but I don’t work because I’m raising three small children. It [shopping here] helps us get things that we can’t afford. It’s a blessing from God,” she said through a Spanish translator.

That morning, clients sifted through clothes in bins and on tables with help from the volunteers — many fluent in Spanish — who later checked them out by placing their items in plastic shopping bags. The ministry shares the large gathering space with other local social service agencies set up there temporarily on Fridays, such as a food bank, an insurance program and the Women Infant and Children (WIC) benefits program.

“It’s very touching. Some clients donate the baby and children’s clothes back to the store, after their kids have outgrown them,” said Sister Mary Beth Lloyd, who coordinates the work, as she helped clients, who hail from countries, including Nicaragua, Guatemala, El Salvador, Egypt, Palestine and Bangladesh.

Meanwhile, a few volunteers staffed tables that offered other services, such as signing up clients to become parishioners of St. Margaret’s. They have helped bring clients back to the Church, assisted with the baptisms of their babies and helped plan the funeral of a client’s brother — thanks to Father Hernan Arias, St. Margaret’s pastor, who has been supportive of the ministry. Other volunteers took requests for furniture and appliances. When these items become available, staffers deliver them to clients’ homes, said Sister Mary Beth.

“When I make deliveries, I notice that the clients’ families usually live many to a room or apartment. Often, they are so poor that they sleep on garbage bags and have no mattresses in the cribs. Yet their places are clean and organized,” Sister Mary Beth said. “They are so grateful to receive these appliances and furniture.”

Once again, John Corr Family Resources plans to expand its offerings by holding its third annual Literacy Fair on Sunday, May 15, from 1 to 3 p.m., in St. Margaret’s parish center. It will feature the sale of children’s books, as well as free eye exams, and appearances by representatives from community, municipal and civic organizations, Sister Mary Beth said.

In a short time, the clients have become family to the volunteers. On April 1, a woman descended the steps of the store with a double stroller — which the ministry provided — to show off her 11-day-old twins, a boy and a girl. Clients and volunteers crowded around the stroller to admire them. Staffers have gotten to know not only their clients, spouses and children, but also their struggles. Sometimes, they dispense advice, Sister Mary Beth said.

“It’s very humbling that this [volunteering] is something I can do. I believe that, if there is a need, you should do what you can,” said Angela Calabria of St. Christopher Parish, Parsippany, who volunteers with her sister, brother-in-law and granddaughter.

During the week, volunteers collect items donated, because of word of mouth. Many local Catholic parishes and schools and Girl Scout troops have organized drives for items, along with donations by individuals. This month, the students of Villa Walsh Academy, Morristown, will throw a baby shower for some of the mothers, Sister Mary Beth said.

“Sister Mary Beth prays for something and most of the time, we get it,” said volunteer Teresa Prendergast, an Oblate of St. Benedict from Delbarton, Morristown, who noted that items — requested or not — sometimes “show up” at the doorsteps of the motherhouse or staffers’ residences. Then, volunteers sort the items for distribution.

Other benefactors to the ministry include a Realtor friend of Sister Mary Beth’s, who asks colleagues to look out for furniture being discarded from houses. With the help of Peter Keller and his family, John Corr Family Resources will hold its annual fundraising dinner on Wednesday, June 1, from 7 to 9 p.m. at the Madison Hotel, Sister Mary Beth said.

The Filippinis’ ministry takes its name from one of Sister Mary Beth’s friends, Msgr. John Corr, pastor emeritus of Christ the King Parish, New Vernon, who died in 2013. The John Corr Resources previously set up similar ministries in Newark. Later, when Bishop Serratelli learned about the Filippinis’ operations in the Newark Archdiocese, he asked them to establish an outreach at St. Margaret’s.

By 11:15 a.m. on April 1, Prendergast helps break down tables and pack up bins to close up for another Friday. She tells The Beacon that she does not volunteer to feel “like a saint.”

“Instead, I love seeing the babies and young children. They light up,” Prendergast said. “The clients are very warm. They are so grateful. We care about them, worry about them and want to get what they need,” she said.

To visit, donate items, make a monetary donation or attend the May 15 book fair or the June 1 fundraising dinner. Call Sister Mary Beth Lloyd at (916) 202-8382.

Read the full article at http://www.evergreeneditions.com/article/Filippini+Ministry+Provides+Help+For+Young+Migrant+Mothers/2450554/297011/article.html.

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