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The Beacon The Beacon June 23 2016 : Page 1

3 BI S HOP N A ME S NEW EXE C UTIVE DIRE C TOR FOR S TR A IGHT A ND N A RROW SUSSEX PASSAIC THE A W A RDWINNING NEW S P A PER OF THE R. C . DIO C E S E OF P A TER S ON, N.J. MORRIS JUNE 23, 2016 The Catholic Center for Evangelization at Bayley-Ellard 9 8 Five diocesan priests share once-in-a-lifetime experience with Pope BY MICHAEL WOJCIK NE WS EDIT OR G RADUATION 2016 DE AC ON A TTEND S S PE C I A L JUBILEE FOR DE AC ON S WITH POPE BI S HOP IN S T A LL S NEW P AS TOR A T S T. M A RY, HELP OF C HRI S TI A N S P A RI S H IN P A TER S ON 6-7 9 10 11-16 2 V IEWPOINT W HAT T O D O O BITUARIES C LASSIFIEDS ROME Earlier this month, five priests of the Paterson Diocese shared in a once-in-a-lifetime ex-perience here in the heart of the Catholic Church. The priests, along with 6,000 fellow priests from around the world, received faith-filled encouragement directly from Pope Francis about how they can invite people into the heart of God’s love and forgive-ness during this Jubilee Year of Mercy and beyond. From June 1 to 3, Pope Francis led a Jubilee for Priests in Rome, which included his reflections about the priest as a “minister of mercy,” talks by bishops from around the world, liturgies and Eucharistic Adoration. Also, partici-pating priests had opportunities to receive Reconciliation, walk through the Holy Doors at St. Peter’s Basilica and other basilicas here and engage in fellowship. Father Geno Sylva, a Diocesan priest who is an official with the Pontifical Council for Promoting the New Evangelization at the Vatican, helped organize the re-treat — one of numerous activities that the Pontiff has scheduled in Rome for the Jubilee Year of Mercy, which the universal Church will continue celebrating until it concludes in November. Meanwhile, Father James Platania, a student at the North American College here, and Father Lemmuel Camacho, a graduate student at the Pontifical University of St. Thomas Aquinas in Rome, had the unique opportunity of as-sisting during the retreat. Also at-tending the Jubilee event were Msgr. James Mahoney, diocesan vicar general and moderator of the curia and pastor of Corpus Christi Parish, Chatham Township, and Msgr. Joseph Goode, pastor of Our Lady of the Mountain and St. Mark parishes, both in Long Valley. PRIESTS WITH POPE on 8 BEACON PHOTO | JOE GIGLI At Morris Catholic High School in Denville, Rebecca Natoli takes a selfie with Peter Palumbo behind her during graduation June 2. Nearly 700 students were graduated from the three diocesan high schools and four private high schools in the Diocese of Paterson. Collectively, graduates received more than $100 million in scholarships. Complete coverage of Catholic school graduations begins on page G1. DO NOT DELAY — TIME SENSITIVE NEWS Parishes inspired to act in year since ‘Laudato Si’ release BY MICHAEL WOJCIK NE WS EDIT OR LITTLE FALLS This month, the Church and the global community celebrate the first anniver-sary of the publication of “Laudato Si: On Care for Our Common Home,” Pope Francis’ ground-breaking encyclical that urges everyone to take part in the urgent mission of protecting the Earth and caring for our fellow humans. In that time, the document also has inspired some parishes in the Paterson Diocese to get involved in educating people about the Pope’s message, the environment and social justice or take di-rect action on conservation initiatives. Among those parishes that have acted on “Laudato Si” since its release June 18 last year are Our Lady of the Holy Angels, Little Falls; St. Matthew the Apostle, Randolph; and St. Mary’s, Pompton Lakes. Holy Angels recently held a presentation on “Laudato Si” while St. Mary’s has been engaged in both environmen-with water,” said Elizabeth Robinson, a St. tal education and action. Matthew’s parishioner, who gave presentations Meanwhile, St. Matthew’s installed a water on “Laudato Si” to the parish community, after filter on a faucet in a small sink in the kitchen getting permission from Father Daniel Murphy, of its parish office to help reduce pastor, and suggesting the new the use of bottled water, while water filter in consultation with The Pope also educating faithful about the the parish office staff. “[This is] an environment. It has the capability urges us to issue that goes well beyond the re-of filtering about 5,000 gallons cycling of plastic water bottles; wa-‘hear the per filter and has been outfitted ter commoditization is over-pump-with a hose attachment for ease ing our groundwater’s worldwide, cry of the of filling pitchers and coolers for leaving tables lower and lower. We Earth and meetings and parties — part of can stand with Pope Francis and the parishes ongoing conserva-help expand the spirit of the letter. the cry of tion efforts, which include in-Let’s all try to reduce, if not totally the poor.’ stalling LED light bulbs. stop, buying cases of water for use “The Pope eloquently addresses in our homes. We can no longer our responsibility of caring our common home do what ‘we’ve always done’ to make a differ-and for our making changes if we wish to leave ence. The journey begins with one step,” she resources for our children, grandchildren and wrote in the parish bulletin. generations to come. A great place to start is LAUDATO SI on 5

Five Diocesan Priests Share Once-In-A-Lifetime Experience With Pope

Michael Wojcik

ROME Earlier this month, five priests of the Paterson Diocese shared in a once-in-a-lifetime experience here in the heart of the Catholic Church. The priests, along with 6,000 fellow priests from around the world, received faith-filled encouragement directly from Pope Francis about how they can invite people into the heart of God’s love and forgiveness during this Jubilee Year of Mercy and beyond.

From June 1 to 3, Pope Francis led a Jubilee for Priests in Rome, which included his reflections about the priest as a “minister of mercy,” talks by bishops from around the world, liturgies and Eucharistic Adoration. Also, participating priests had opportunities to receive Reconciliation, walk through the Holy Doors at St. Peter’s Basilica and other basilicas here and engage in fellowship. Father Geno Sylva, a Diocesan priest who is an official with the Pontifical Council for Promoting the New Evangelization at the Vatican, helped organize the retreat — one of numerous activities that the Pontiff has scheduled in Rome for the Jubilee Year of Mercy, which the universal Church will continue celebrating until it concludes in November.

Meanwhile, Father James Platania, a student at the North American College here, and Father Lemmuel Camacho, a graduate student at the Pontifical University of St. Thomas Aquinas in Rome, had the unique opportunity of assisting during the retreat. Also attending the Jubilee event were Msgr. James Mahoney, diocesan vicar general and moderator of the curia and pastor of Corpus Christi Parish, Chatham Township, and Msgr. Joseph Goode, pastor of Our Lady of the Mountain and St. Mark parishes, both in Long Valley.

“He [Pope Francis] was practical, down to earth, [with] no jargon, and basically presented himself to us as a wise friend, who was inviting us to bring the mercy of Jesus to the people we serve,” Msgr. Mahoney wrote on the Jubilee for Priests on his web log, or “blog.” He called the three conferences held on the second day, which featured the Pope’s reflections, “clearly the most wonderful spiritual experience of my life with the solitary exception of pilgrimages made in the Holy Land. In truth, he gave us a lot of challenges, which will take some time to both understand and live out. But it is worth doing.”

On the first day, priests and seminarians visited one of the three Jubilee Churches for the Holy Year: San Salvatore in Lauro, Santa Maria in Vallicella and San Giovanni dei Fiorentini, where they could receive Reconciliation and spend time in Eucharis tic Adoration. Then, they made a pilgrimage to the Holy Door of St. Peter’s, followed by several bishops from around the world delivering teachings about mercy in different languages, including a catechesis in English by Auxiliary Bishop Robert Barron of Los Angeles. Later, Father Platania served as master of ceremonies during a Mass for English-speaking priests at Sant’Andrea della Valle with Bishop Barron and Archbishop Arthur Roche of the Leeds Archdiocese in England.

“It was a joy for me to serve as master of ceremonies at the Mass and facilitate a prayerful liturgy for the hundreds of priests who concelebrated,” Father Plantania said.

The second day focused on three conferences by Pope Francis, who prayed with the priests and delivered three hour-long reflections on mercy at three different basilicas in Rome. They were held at St. John Lateran for Italian priests not of the Diocese of Rome or the Vatican; St. Mary Major for priests of the Diocese of Rome or the Vatican; and St. Paul Outside the Walls for all other priests.

During these conferences, the Pontiff spoke in Italian, while the priests listened in one of eight languages through interpreters in their headphones. Also, participants watched the conferences at the other basilicas on large video screens. In between the meditations, they joined in Eucharistic Adoration and had time to spend time in silent prayer before God, Father Sylva said.

In his final reflection at St. Mary Major that day, the diocesan priests watched and listened as Pope Francis encouraged priests to become “signs and instruments of an encounter” — welcoming people and inviting them to have “a genuine encounter with the God of mercy.”

“Pope Francis motivates me both by words and by actions to live out a priesthood of mercy. His insistence on care for the poor and the corporal and spiritual works of mercy inspire me to do more in my own vocation to help bring about God’s mercy on earth,” said Father Platania, who helped with seating for the conference at St. Paul Outside the Walls.

That day, the Pope struck Msgr. Goode as “very gentle, personable and calm — the same as I have seen him on TV.”

“Pope Francis has a friendliness, is genuine and has a concern for people,” said Msgr. Goode, who had never been in the presence of the current Pontiff before and unfortunately did not receive the opportunity to meet him face to face during the Jubilee for Priests. “He spoke about how priests should be instruments of mercy to others — every person. It was great that he dedicated time to priests,” the priest said.

At St. Paul Outside the Walls, Father Sylva was inspired “to see so many priests, many of whom were in Rome for the first time, on bended knee in prayer throughout the retreat day. The feeling of fraternal connection between the Holy Father and those present was palpable.”

“It was wonderful having four of my diocesan brothers present for this great Jubilee event,” Father Sylva said.

At the end of the second day of the Jubilee for Priests, Pope Francis concelebrated Mass with the priests with Father Platania assisting. On June 3, the final day, the Pope celebrated Mass in the morning in St. Peter’s Square.

After the Jubilee for Priests, Father Camacho called Pope Francis’ reflections during the event “reminders of concrete examples on pastoral service for God’s people.”

“Priests are asked to re-examine what already has been part of pastoral work entrusted to them when they were ordained,” Father Camacho said. “This can be accomplished by being faithful to the teachings of the Church as revealed in Scripture and Tradition. It is also allowing the understanding gained from these truths flow out as charity to the people whom the priest serve.”

Read the full article at http://www.evergreeneditions.com/article/Five+Diocesan+Priests+Share+Once-In-A-Lifetime+Experience+With+Pope/2515570/314701/article.html.

Parishes Inspired To Act In Year Since ‘laudato Si’ Release

Michael Wojcik

LITTLE FALLS This month, the Church and the global community celebrate the first anniversary of the publication of “Laudato Si: On Care for Our Common Home,” Pope Francis’ groundbreaking encyclical that urges everyone to take part in the urgent mission of protecting the Earth and caring for our fellow humans. In that time, the document also has inspired some parishes in the Paterson Diocese to get involved in educating people about the Pope’s message, the environment and social justice or take direct action on conservation initiatives.

Among those parishes that have acted on “Laudato Si” since its release June 18 last year are Our Lady of the Holy Angels, Little Falls; St. Matthew the Apostle, Randolph; and St. Mary’s, Pompton Lakes. Holy Angels recently held a presentation on “Laudato Si” while St. Mary’s has been engaged in both environmental education and action.

Meanwhile, St. Matthew’s installed a water filter on a faucet in a small sink in the kitchen of its parish office to help reduce the use of bottled water, while also educating faithful about the environment. It has the capability of filtering about 5,000 gallons per filter and has been outfitted with a hose attachment for ease of filling pitchers and coolers for meetings and parties — part of the parishes ongoing conservation efforts, which include installing LED light bulbs.

“The Pope eloquently addresses our responsibility of caring our common home and for our making changes if we wish to leave resources for our children, grandchildren and generations to come. A great place to start is with water,” said Elizabeth Robinson, a St. Matthew’s parishioner, who gave presentations on “Laudato Si” to the parish community, after getting permission from Father Daniel Murphy, pastor, and suggesting the new water filter in consultation with the parish office staff. “[This is] an issue that goes well beyond the recycling of plastic water bottles; water commoditization is over-pumping our groundwater’s worldwide, leaving tables lower and lower. We can stand with Pope Francis and help expand the spirit of the letter. Let’s all try to reduce, if not totally stop, buying cases of water for use in our homes. We can no longer do what ‘we’ve always done’ to make a difference. The journey begins with one step,” she wrote in the parish bulletin.

Since the release of “Laudato Si,” St. Mary’s Advocates for Justice — part of the parish’s Social Justice Ministry — has been giving presentations on the document in the parish, in other parishes and to organizations around the community. The Pope’s message has energized the already active Social Justice Ministry, which established a website, earthactions.org, for education and advocacy about issues, such as climate change; genetically modified organisms (GMOs) in food production; and fracking, or hydraulic fracturing. The group lobbied lawmakers to oppose a proposed oil pipeline through New Jersey, said Jackie Schramm, Social Justice Ministry director, who noted, “Pope Francis’ [in the letter] guidance moved us in this direction.” The Justice and Peace Committee of Holy Angels marked the first anniversary of “Laudato Si” by holding a talk on June 15 to examine the encyclical and discuss possible individual and community action. Presenting the talk was Jim Andreano, a committee member and a certified presenter for the Climate Reality Project, who has spoken previously at the parish about climate change.

“The Pope is writing to the entire world. Our conversation must include all, because environmental challenges affect us all. We must bring the world together for sustainable and integral development,” said Andreano, quoting and paraphrasing the U.S. Catholic Conference of Bishops’ synopsis of the encyclical, which quotes it at length. “The fruits [of the earth] are for everyone. We are responsible for our neighbor and have care of the earth. We are not God. We must develop, direct and limit our power,” he said.

The Pope urges us to “hear the cry of the earth and the cry of the poor.” The poor, who usually have no power or influence to speak up for themselves, live in places affected by global warming that make their poverty worse and ruin the land that provides their livelihood. In turn, the developing nations that create most of the problems feel the least impact. To reduce our impact on the environment, we need to make changes in our production and consumption of goods and simplify our lifestyle, said Andreano in quoting Pope Francis.

Although some prefer the U.S. to stand alone in the world, the nations of the globe need to act in solidarity in confronting these environmental and social problems, in part, by ratifying enforceable international agreements that carry meaningful punishments for violators. “The Pope speaks about the spiritual roots of environmentalism. The Eucharist motivates us to be stewards of all creation, while christianity gives us a reason to hope that our efforts will change the world,” Andreano said.

“So it is time to act. All Christian’s communities and individuals have a role to play and can make a difference,” said Andreano, who noted that individuals and parishes can take steps to reduce emissions but also must lobby civil and political leaders to enact environmental legislation.

Read the full article at http://www.evergreeneditions.com/article/Parishes+Inspired+To+Act+In+Year+Since+%E2%80%98laudato+Si%E2%80%99+Release/2515571/314701/article.html.

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