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The Beacon The Beacon June 30 2016 : Page 1

2 FOUR RETIRING PASTORS WILL CONTINUE TO SERVE GOD’S PEOPLE SUSSEX PASSAIC THE AWARDWINNING NEWSPAPER OF THE R.C. DIOCESE OF PATERSON, N.J. MORRIS JUNE 30, 2016 S ILVER J UBILEE The Catholic Center for Evangelization at Bayley-Ellard 9 Professor examines impact religious sisters have on American life By MICHAEL WOJCIK NE WS EDIT OR ‘T HE S HAPING ‘ OF A MERICA ’ 10 11 SERRA CLUB HOSTS ANNUAL EVENT FOR SEMINARIANS, RECENTLY ORDAINED AND RETIRING PASTORS FILM DIRECTED BY STAFFER AT ST. PAUL INSIDE THE WALLS HAS DEBUT 8 9 13-14 15-20 DO NOT DELAY — TIME SENSITIVE NEWS BEACON PHOTO | JOE GIGLI O BITUARIES W HAT T O D O V IEWPOINT C LASSIFIEDS Five Franciscan Sisters of St. Elizabeth marked their 25th anniversary of religious profession June 26 in the chapel at St. Francis of Assisi delegate house in Parsippany. The silver jubilee began with a Mass of Thanksgiving celebrated by Bishop Serratelli with a dozen priests as concelebrants. Mother Lilly Pereppaddan, delegate general of the order, was in attendance. The five jubilarians are Sisters Martina Chang, Jane Rose Chunkan, Alice Ottapurackal, Mary Grace Tran and Sherly Vazhappilly. Pictured is Sister Immaculata Atienza, silhouetted by a stained glass window of St. Francis, leading the Prayers of the Faithful during Mass. There will be more coverage of the silver jubilee celebration in the July 7 issue of The Beacon. MADISON Religious sisters, who work tirelessly in a variety of Catholic ministries throughout the U.S. today, carry on the legacy of their courageous forebears — religious communities whose members often acted like CEOs, blessed with the vision and perseverance to found ma-jor institutions in the early history of the coun-try, including women’s colleges, parochial schools and hospitals. Even in America’s earliest days, religious sis-ters also acted as pioneers, braving the dangers of bringing the Church and God’s love to set-tlers during expansion in the West. They also blazed trails in the nation’s cities, bringing God’s mercy through their varied outreaches to the poor and forgotten, said Marie Mullaney, Ph.D., a professor at Caldwell University, during her presentation, “Catholic Sisters and the ‘SHAPING OF AMERICA’ on 6 Parishes invited to donate First Communion outfits By CECILE SAN AGUSTIN REPOR TER To benefit Father English Center for needy children ion outfits and donate them to those less fortunate. At the Father English Center here, as First Holy Communion celebrations have already hap-pened across parishes in the Paterson Diocese, its clothing bou-tique is welcoming donations of these pretty dresses and handsome suits, usually worn once because a child outgrows them or there isn’t another occasion to wear them. In addition, accessories such as shoes and First Communion veils are al-so accepted. Carlos Roldan, director of the food pantry and clothing boutique at Father English, a Diocesan Catholic Charities agency, said, “We have some moms asking us for First Communion outfits since they are expensive and they just don’t have the money to buy them. It’s tough because for a child to receive First Communion, it shouldn’t be considered a finan-cial burden, but one of the most joyful days in the life of a child and their families.” Two parishes that have collected dresses and suits are Our Lady of Consolation in Wayne and Our Lady of the Holy Angels in Little Falls, which held collections recent-ly for the Father English Center. Early in the year, a mother, Patricia DiToro from Our Lady of Consolation, inquired at the Religious Education office at her parish if there was a need for a First Communion dress worn by her daughter, Debra Dericks, who coordinates religious education, at-tempted to find a local family, but received no response. She then thought about the Father English Center and the agency gladly ac-cepted the dress. From there, the parish held a drive collecting about a dozen dresses and one suit dur-ing the month of March. “The collection served an impor-tant purpose, it allowed families to FATHER ENGLISH on 8 PATERSON One of the most im-portant events in a young Cath -olic’s life is his or her First Holy Communion. To go along with this special occasion of receiving Jesus for the first time in the Eucharist, girls wear a pretty new white dress or and boys wear a new blue or white suit with a tie. While First Communion outfits are sometimes passed down to younger siblings in families, oth-ers are kept for sentimental value but often get forgotten and are buried deep in a closet where they collect dust. For this reason some parishes have decided to host collections of First Com mun -

‘The Shaping Of America’

Michael Wojcik

Professor examines impact religious sisters have on American life

MADISON Religious sisters, who work tirelessly in a variety of Catholic ministries throughout the U.S. today, carry on the legacy of their courageous forebears — religious communities whose members often acted like CEOs, blessed with the vision and perseverance to found major institutions in the early history of the country, including women’s colleges, parochial schools and hospitals.

Even in America’s earliest days, religious sisters also acted as pioneers, braving the dangers of bringing the Church and God’s love to settlers during expansion in the West. They also blazed trails in the nation’s cities, bringing God’s mercy through their varied outreaches to the poor and forgotten, said Marie Mullaney, Ph.D., a professor at Caldwell University, during her presentation, “Catholic Sisters and the Shaping of America,” on June 22 at St. Paul Inside the Walls: the Diocesan Center for Evangelization at Bayley-Ellard here.

“Religious sisters are the largest and oldest group of women to contribute to American life. By 1920, they built more than 500 hospitals, 50 women’s colleges and 6,000 parochial schools,” said Mullaney, who teaches women’s history and the history of Catholicism in America at Caldwell University. During her talk, she examined the history and impact of religious sisters on the U.S. It was attended by religious sisters from many communities that serve in the Paterson Diocese and beyond. “Because they have been so humble and so busy serving others, these sisters did not create archives or collect materials to document all of their accomplishments. Their story hasn’t been told,” she said.

So that night at St. Paul’s, Mullaney started telling the story of religious sisters in the U.S. from the beginning: the establishment of the New World, which took place from the 1500s to the 1600s. They traveled from Europe to the overwhelmingly Protestant 13 colonies, where Catholics comprised only 1 percent of the population. The first community was the Ursuline Sisters of France, who accepted the local bishop’s invitation in 1727 to care for the sick during a cholera epidemic in New Orleans, she said.

“The sisters found that the European model of living in a cloistered community did not work in the U.S. They did hard physical labor, had to learn English and had to endure harsh conditions traveling by mule, horse-drawn buggy or boat. A journey out West could take weeks or months,” Mullaney said.

Early on, religious sisters braved the dangers of serving on the undeveloped expanse of land, known as the frontier. The sisters also performed manual work: taking care of animals, farming, making their own clothes and raising funds by begging, Mullaney said.

Since the early history of the U.S., religious sisters have ministered to immigrants and other diverse populations. During the height of Catholic migration in the 19th century, the Sisters of Mercy, founded in Dublin, arrived in 1827 to serve Irish communities in so many areas, Mullaney said.

“Often, the sisters became more familiar and visible to the faithful than the priests, because they served everyday in schools, parishes, orphanages and hospitals,” Mullaney said.

Religious communities also ministered to many marginalized populations, including African-Americans during the years prior to the abolition of slavery and continuing through more than a century after the end of the Civil War. Orders of mixed-race sisters were established. The Oblate Sisters of Providence founded the first school for African-Americans in Baltimore in 1828, St. Katherine Drexel established a religious community in Philadelphia to serve American Indians and African Americans. Mother Murphy arrived in Texas to found schools and orphanages to minister to Mexican immigrants, Mullaney said.

One of the religious sisters’ most significant ministries has been education, having established women’s colleges and parochial high schools and elementary schools through out the U.S. In 1727, the Ursulines founded a girl’s school in New Orleans — still considered the oldest in the country. In 1860, the Sisters of Charity opened the Academy of St. Elizabeth, Convent Station, in the Diocese — the oldest high school for girls in the state. Dominican Sisters founded Caldwell College [now a university]— where Mullaney has taught for 36 years — in 1939. The Sisters of Christian Charity continue to operate the only college remaining in the U.S. for the religious formation of religious sisters: Assumption College for Sisters in Denville, said the speaker, a product of Catholic education.

Another critical outreach for religious sisters was medical care. They cared for sick people and orphans, established the first Catholic hospitals and the first Catholic nursing school and helped professionalize the field of nursing, which was not considered a proper career for women in the 19th century. About 600 sisters cared for wounded Union and Confederate soldiers on the battlefield and in hospitals during the Civil War, which helped reduce anti-Catholic bias in the nation. Later in the century, religious sisters helped St. Damien of Molokai care for lepers in Hawaii, Mullaney said.

“This [presentation] was a good story told well. It was a beautifully researched, organized and visual program,” said Father Paul Manning, St. Paul’s executive director and diocesan vicar for evangelization, after the talk, which was highlighted by many historical photographs. “Thanks for all of you, who said ‘yes’ [to a religious vocation]. You have blessed this country with your loving service. We thank God for you,” he said.

Mullaney developed her presentation about how religious sisters have helped shape the U.S. after training and advising Caldwell students who conducted and recorded interviews with six Dominican sisters, who have played significant roles in the history of the university. This undertaking, which the students completed in an independent study course, was part of “Sister Story,” a much larger project, funded by the Hilton Foundation, which has been collecting the oral histories of women religious. The archives of these materials have been housed at St. Catherine University in St. Paul / Minneapolis, said Mullaney, whose husband, Kenneth F. Mullaney Jr., serves as diocesan counsel.

“Dr. Mullaney’s presentation left us [religious sisters] with renewed pride for all communities in the U.S. She pointed out the many accomplishments of early sisters, serving where there was a need — as religious sisters still do today,” said Sister of Christian Charity Joan Daniel, diocesan vice chancellor and delegate for religious, who attended the talk.

Read the full article at http://www.evergreeneditions.com/article/%E2%80%98The+Shaping+Of+America%E2%80%99/2522617/317099/article.html.

Parishes Invited To Donate First Communion Outfits

Cecile San Agustin

To benefit Father English Center for needy children

PATERSON One of the most important events in a young Catholic’s life is his or her First Holy Communion. To go along with this special occasion of receiving Jesus for the first time in the Eucharist, girls wear a pretty new white dress or and boys wear a new blue or white suit with a tie.

While First Communion outfits are sometimes passed down to younger siblings in families, others are kept for sentimental value but often get forgotten and are buried deep in a closet where they collect dust. For this reason some parishes have decided to host collections of First Com mun - ion outfits and donate them to those less fortunate.

At the Father English Center here, as First Holy Communion celebrations have already happened across parishes in the Paterson Diocese, its clothing boutique is welcoming donations of these pretty dresses and handsome suits, usually worn once because a child outgrows them or there isn’t another occasion to wear them. In addition, accessories such as shoes and First Communion veils are also accepted.

Carlos Roldan, director of the food pantry and clothing boutique at Father English, a Diocesan Catholic Charities agency, said, “We have some moms asking us for First Communion outfits since they are expensive and they just don’t have the money to buy them. It’s tough because for a child to receive First Communion, it shouldn’t be considered a financial burden, but one of the most joyful days in the life of a child and their families.”

Two parishes that have collected dresses and suits are Our Lady of Consolation in Wayne and Our Lady of the Holy Angels in Little Falls, which held collections recently for the Father English Center.

Early in the year, a mother, Patricia DiToro from Our Lady of Consolation, inquired at the Religious Education office at her parish if there was a need for a First Communion dress worn by her daughter, Debra Dericks, who coordinates religious education, attempted to find a local family, but received no response. She then thought about the Father English Center and the agency gladly accepted the dress. From there, the parish held a drive collecting about a dozen dresses and one suit during the month of March.

“The collection served an important purpose, it allowed families to find a place for these outfits, which have sentimental value, be used for a child receiving their First Communion, whose family couldn’t afford it,” said Dericks. “We hope next year to continue this collection.”

At Holy Angels, the parish had similar results with the collection, placing an announcement in its weekly bulletin stating: “Please help to make the First Holy Communion of a child even happier by donating gently used First Holy Communion dresses and suits.”

The collection allows children and their families to not worry about an outfit and focus on the Sacrament. In fact, some families have considered delaying their child’s reception of the Sacrament of First Holy Communion because they can’t afford a dress or suit.

Roldan noted the agency usually receives more dresses than suits and hopes families are able to donate First Communion suits for boys as well. “This is something that would be great if we can get on a regular basis especially for next spring when First Communion comes around again. God bless everyone that wants to be a part of this project.”

[To donate a gently used First Communion outfit, email Carlos Roldan at croldan@catholicharities.org. ]

Read the full article at http://www.evergreeneditions.com/article/Parishes+Invited+To+Donate+First+Communion+Outfits/2522624/317099/article.html.

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