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The Beacon The Beacon September 1 2016 : Page 1

BI S HOP TO C ELEBR A TE DIO C E S E’ S FIR S T JUBILEE M ASS FOR DE AC ON S S EPT. 10 SUSSEX PASSAIC THE A W A RDWINNING NEW S P A PER OF THE R. C . DIO C E S E OF P A TER S ON, N.J. 3 MORRIS SEPTEMBER 1, 2016 ‘B E R ICH IN G OOD W ORKS ’ 11 The Catholic Center for Evangelization at Bayley-Ellard 2016 Bishop’s Annual Appeal to kick off at weekend Masses Sept. 10-11 By CECILE PAGLIARULO REPORTER B1-B12 A NNU A L B AC KTO SC HOOL S E C TION 10 THREEP A RT F A ITH S ERIE S FOR MOTHER S , YOUNG C HILDREN S T A RT S S EPT. 12 A T S T. P A UL IN S IDE THE W A LL S 6-7 10 11 12-16 BEACON PHOTO | JOE GIGLI V OLLEYING FOR V OCATIONS New religious enjoy a game of volleyball on the bucolic grounds of the Motherhouse of the Sisters of Christian Charity in Mendham Aug. 25. They were gathered there for the Diocese’s annual summer gathering for new religious, those discerning religious life and vocation directors. Nearly 100 new religious and discerners, both men and women, attended the day. For story and more photos, see page 8. V IEWPOINT O BITUARIES W HAT T O D O C LASSIFIEDS CLIFTON The 2016 Bishop’s Annual Appeal (BAA) kicks-off during the weekend of Sept. 10-11, at Masses in parishes across the diocese giving the faithful the opportunity to support the work of various ministries in the Diocese. Led by the theme, “Be Rich in Good Works” (1 Tm 6:18), the Appeal invites parishioners to help fund ministries that serve the poor, sick and needy; inner-city elementary school students; diocesan seminarians and retired priests. Last year, the 2015 Bishop’s Annual Appeal raised a record $4,116,170 and was one of the most successful years in new donor participation. To prepare for the 2016 BAA, pastors, priests and lay appeal chairpersons came to a kick-off meeting with Bishop Serratelli Aug. 23 at the St. Pope John Paul II Center here. Through the gen-erosity of donors, the BAA will support Catholic Charities agen-cies in the Diocese, inner-city area elementary school students, semi-narian education and Nazareth Village, the Diocese’s residence for BAA on 4 DO NOT DELAY — TIME SENSITIVE NEWS Bishop helps Sandyston parish celebrate 75th anniversary By MICHAEL WOJCIK NE WS EDIT OR SANDYSTON Bishop Serratelli traveled northern Sussex County Aug. 28 to celebrate 75 years of faith at St. Thomas the Apostle Parish here — a small, tight-knit rural “frontier” faith community at the furthest reaches of the Diocese that nevertheless has remained close to the heart of Jesus through worship, service and fellowship. St. Thomas Church was filled during the 9:30 a.m. Mass for the parish’s 75th anniversary, where the Bishop served as main cele-brant and homilist. Concelebrating were Father Wayne Varga pastor of both St. Thomas and St. James the Greater Parish, Montague; Father Kevin Corcoran, priest-secre-tary to the Bishop; and Father John Boland, a retired diocesan priest and former pastor of St. Francis de Sales Parish in the McAfee section of Vernon. Assis ting was Deacon Wayne von Doehren. “The people of St. Thomas and St. James are so prayerful and so involved in outreach here,” said Father Varga, pastor of both parishes for the past nine years. “The people are wonderful. They are so helpful. They make both parishes run,” he said. In addition to regular liturgies, St. Thomas and St. James — which cover one-sixth of the entire territory of the diocese — have cultivated a spiritual atmosphere with Children’s Liturgy of the Word from September to April as part of the 9:30 a.m. Mass on Sun -days and Adoration of the Blessed Sacrament on Fridays. The parishes also have groups, such as Rosaries for Peace, Rosary & Altar Society and the Legion of Mary. In 2013, some parishioners of both parishes consecrated their lives through a process called an “Act of Total Consecration to Jesus through Mary.” They participated in a 33-day spiritual process, created by St. Louis de Montfort, during which they experienced a process of self-examination, read Scripture pas-sages daily and prayed. St. Thomas, which has 250 families, and St. James, which has 150 families, also have been in-volved in outreach to the parishes and to those in need. The Knights of Columbus has re-painted St. Thomas’ church hall, while the Columbiettes conducted a school supplies drive for needy kids. The Legion of Mary visits the sick, while the Prayer Shawl Ministry is nearing the completion of its 1,000th prayer shawl. Also, the parishes have been encouraging their faithful to visit their neigh-bors and hand them a welcome 75TH on 9

Volleying For Vocations

New religious enjoy a game of volleyball on the bucolic grounds of the Motherhouse of the Sisters of Christian Charity in Mendham Aug. 25. They were gathered there for the Diocese’s annual summer gathering for new religious, those discerning religious life and vocation directors. Nearly 100 new religious and discerners, both men and women, attended the day. For story and more photos, see page 8.

Read the full article at http://www.evergreeneditions.com/article/Volleying+For+Vocations/2574801/334267/article.html.

‘Be Rich In Good Works’

Cecile Pagliarulo

2016 Bishop’s Annual Appeal to kick off at weekend Masses Sept. 10-11

LIFTON The 2016 Bishop’s Annual Appeal (BAA) kicks-off during the weekend of Sept. 10- 11, at Masses in parishes across the diocese giving the faithful the opportunity to support the work of various ministries in the Diocese.

Led by the theme, “Be Rich in Good Works” (1 Tm 6:18), the Appeal invites parishioners to help fund ministries that serve the poor, sick and needy; inner-city elementary school students; diocesan seminarians and retired priests. Last year, the 2015 Bishop’s Annual Appeal raised a record $4,116,170 and was one of the most successful years in new donor participation.

To prepare for the 2016 BAA, pastors, priests and lay appeal chairpersons came to a kick-off meeting with Bishop Serratelli Aug. 23 at the St. Pope John Paul II Center here. Through the generosity of donors, the BAA will support Catholic Charities agen- cies in the Diocese, inner-city area elementary school students, semi- narian education and Nazareth Village, the Diocese’s residence for Retired priests.

Discussing the theme of this year’s BAA, Bishop Serratelli told those gathered, “St. Paul saw a vital connection between giving and experiencing the happiness that only God can give us. This is what he says in 1 Timothy, chapter 6, from which this year’s Appeal theme has been taken. Paul is instructing us to be thoughtful, to be serious, to be fervent about giving. Our charitable giving should never be an afterthought. We always give God the first roots, never what’s left over at the end. We are to be energetic and enthusiastic for the Lord truly loves a cheerful giver.”

For the next few months, letters will be sent from the Bishop’s Office and bulletin announcements will be made for parishioners to understand more about the appeal. During weekend Masses on Oct. 15-16, the In-Pew Commitment Weekend will take place in every parish to invite parishioners to make a pledge or donation. During Masses, parishioners will learn about the Appeal and have an opportunity to be part of supporting the Appeal.

Last year, priests of the Diocese, themselves, supported the Appeal by pledging $75,000. Msgr. James Mahoney, diocesan vicar general and pastor of Corpus Christi Parish in Chatham Township, said to his brother priests during the meeting, “That’s us. That’s an incredible thing and shows you we believe in what this Appeal means.”

As he spoke to the priests and lay appeal chairpersons, Msgr. Mahoney encouraged them to follow the instructions of the Appeal given by the Development Office so the 2016 can be just as successful as last year. “For the Appeal, we have guidelines that we know work. Follow the plan that is laid out. It’s going to be very successful. Last year, the BAA was successful even after the Partners in Faith campaign. It’s a credit to each of you. This will make a difference. We know as priests, asking for money, inviting the people to give money, is uncomfortable but in fact, this is a way that people can share in the mission of the Church that takes places in our parishes and in the work of our diocese.”

Tim Potter, director of the diocesan development office, showed the results of last year’s Appeal, focusing on the In-Pew Commitment Weekend that takes place in each individual parish.

“Through your help, your encouragement, we were able to get 3,400 people sitting in these pews to say, ‘Yes, I want to be a part of this. I want to help the diocese. I want to help these ministries.’ They are responding not to a letter, not to a bulletin insert, they are responding to you,” Potter said.

During the meeting, Father Antonio Gaviria spoke about the In-Pew Commitment weekend at St. Jude Parish in Budd Lake, where he is pastor. “When people are happy in a parish community, they will support you anyway they can. As pastor, one of the keys is to make people happy and to be available. The In-Pew weekend is an essential part of the campaign because people pay attention and they feel compelled to give because they are completing the forms together as a group.

In that way, I understood the meaning of a Christian community and the people working as a team altogether doing the same things.”

As parishioners consider making a pledge to the Appeal, it is important to know Partners in Faith serves different needs. The Partners in Faith campaign raised funds for ministries outside the diocese’s general annual operating funds and included some endowments with an eye toward future needs. The Appeal on the other hand, helps fund immediate, day-to-day operations of four important ministries and programs: Catholic Charities, seminarian education, diocesan priests’ retirement residence and inner-city area schools.

The largest percentage of the Appeal supports diocesan Catholic Charities agencies. Each year they provide help to tens of thousands of people in need. Donations support a variety of programs and services in all three counties of the Diocese. They include day care and extended day care for children of working poor families; assisted transportation for the elderly and medically frail; individual and family counseling; emergency food banks; adult day care for economically disadvantaged seniors; housing and case management for persons with HIV/ AIDS group homes for adults with disabilities; family support and case management for families with developmentally and intellectually disabled adults; substance abuse counseling; legal services for low income immigrants; programs for at-risk youth and more. Because the Appeal helps Catholic Charities immensely, there is a speakers’ network of representatives from the agencies available to talk at parishes.

In addition to these agencies, the Appeal will provide a significant portion of funding to Catholic schools and students in the inner city. Last year, many capital improvements such as roof replacement, HVAC upgrades, interior lighting and exterior doors. The Appeal also helped fund financial aid to assist families to be able to afford Catholic school education, technology upgrades to enhance the academic programs offered in the schools and to support school activities.

Also, the Appeal helps to fund education for diocesan seminarians and helps Nazareth Village, the diocesan priests’ retirement residence in Chester. This is especially important since the number of seminarians has increased dramatically in recent years, along with the cost of formation. The appeal helps both these groups of men: those who are preparing for a lifetime of service to the Church and those who have faithfully served for decades.

Similar to past Appeals, parish rebates will be given to parishes that raise more than their Appeal goal. Half the amount received over the target goal is returned To parishes for their own needs.

Parishioners are invited to visit these ministries to see firsthand where their donations are being used. Also 96 cents of every $1 raised is applied only to Appeal needs. They are used for no other purpose, and funds raised in the Paterson Diocese stay in the Paterson Diocese.

Those wishing to make a pledge can do so in three different ways: One-time gifts or pledges paid over several months with reminders; credit card contributions, or online contributions. Legacy gifts to the Appeal can also be considered in will or estate plans.

At the close of the meeting, Bishop Serratelli said, “Thank you to Tim Potter and his team at the Development Office who organize the Appeal asking our people to fulfill the needs of our Diocese. A word of gratitude to all of you especially for the days ahead in soliciting help from our people so that the charitable works of this great Diocese can continue and we can serve Christ.”

[Information: www.rcdop.org or (973) 777-8818, ext. 215.]

Read the full article at http://www.evergreeneditions.com/article/%E2%80%98Be+Rich+In+Good+Works%E2%80%99/2574809/334267/article.html.

Bishop Helps Sandyston Parish Celebrate 75th Anniversary

Michael Wojcik

SANDYSTON Bishop Serratelli traveled northern Sussex County Aug. 28 to celebrate 75 years of faith at St. Thomas the Apostle Parish here — a small, tight-knit rural “frontier” faith community at the furthest reaches of the Diocese that nevertheless has remained close to the heart of Jesus through worship, service and fellowship.

St. Thomas Church was filled during the 9:30 a.m. Mass for the parish’s 75th anniversary, where the Bishop served as main celebrant and homilist. Concelebrating were Father Wayne Varga pastor of both St. Thomas and St. James the Greater Parish, Montague; Father Kevin Corcoran, priest-secretary to the Bishop; and Father John Boland, a retired diocesan priest and former pastor of St. Francis de Sales Parish in the McAfee section of Vernon. Assis ting was Deacon Wayne von Doehren.

“The people of St. Thomas and St. James are so prayerful and so involved in outreach here,” said Father Varga, pastor of both parishes for the past nine years. “The people are wonderful. They are so helpful. They make both parishes run,” he said.

In addition to regular liturgies, St. Thomas and St. James — which cover one-sixth of the entire territory of the diocese — have cultivated a spiritual atmosphere with Children’s Liturgy of the Word from September to April as part of the 9:30 a.m. Mass on Sun - days and Adoration of the Blessed Sacrament on Fridays. The parishes also have groups, such as Rosaries for Peace, Rosary & Altar Society and the Legion of Mary. In 2013, some parishioners of both parishes consecrated their lives through a process called an “Act of Total Consecration to Jesus through Mary.” They participated in a 33- day spiritual process, created by St. Louis de Montfort, during which they experienced a process of self-examination, read Scripture passages daily and prayed.

St. Thomas, which has 250 families, and St. James, which has 150 families, also have been involved in outreach to the parishes and to those in need. The Knights of Columbus has re-painted St. Thomas’ church hall, while the Columbiettes conducted a school supplies drive for needy kids. The Legion of Mary visits the sick, while the Prayer Shawl Ministry is nearing the completion of its 1,000th prayer shawl. Also, the parishes have been encouraging their faithful to visit their neighbors and hand them a welcome packet that contains a bulletins, Mass schedules and a letter from Father Varga.

“It could be an opportunity for parishioners to introduce themselves to their neighbors. There is hope that this will give former or lapsed Catholics or people who are considering the Catholic faith an extra push. It’s a form of evangelization,” Father Varga said.

In addition to the Aug. 28 Mass with the Bishop, St. Thomas has celebrated its 75th anniversary with a July 6 Mass to mark the date of the parish’s founding and first Mass. Also, parishioners have been encouraged to take a notebook, located on the table in the gathering space of the church, and record their good deeds during the day. Older parishioners have been urged to share their memories with members of the parish.

St. Thomas’ legacy of love started with the establishment of the Paterson Diocese in 1937, when Bishop Thomas McLaughlin took an interest in what became the “frontier” of Sussex County. The Sandyston Township Board of Education sold the former Hainesville school building in 1941 for $500 to John and Ruth Gilston, who transferred it to the diocese for $1. It was dedicated as St. Thomas the Apostle Mission Church, which St. Joseph Parish, Newton, administered. The first Mass at St. Thomas was held July 6, 1941, with Bishop McLaughlin presiding. Other local faith communities were added, including St. James in Montague in 1943, according St. Thomas’ history.

Father Francis Warlikowski oversaw construction of a church for St. Thomas. St. James was elevated to parish status in 1945 and administered missions in Hainesville and Wal pack, which have since closed. Father Sylvius Mancini supervised the construction of the rectory at St. James. By 1971, Father Ted Michota expanded the small building that served for three decades as a mission church in Hainesville with the altar, pews and Stations of the Cross of the former mission churches in Walpack incorporated into the enlarged St. Thomas Mission Church, states St. Thomas’ history.

Fast-forward to Dec. 9, 1987, during the Diocese’s Jubilee Year, when Bishop Rodimer elevated St. Thomas to full parish status. In 1999, St. Thomas broke ground for a new church, which was completed and dedicated by Bishop Rodimer during the next year. Through the bequeath of Joan Spoolstra, the parish acquired and converted the former Sandyston Township Firehouse into its educational center. On Jan. 1, 2007, a youth and religious education center, named after the late pastor, Msgr. James Gacquin, was dedicated, according to St. Thomas’ history.

One of the longtime St. Thomas parishioner, Marc Cunico, serves as a trustee and coordinates the maintenance of the buildings on a volunteer basis. This married father of three — a professional in building construction — was baptized at St. James, attended Our Lady Queen of Peace Parish, Branchville, as a young person and joined St. Thomas in 1980.

“St. Thomas has a family atmosphere. It’s friendly and cozy. Everybody knows everybody. We see each other at Sunday Mass and all week long [around the area],” Cunico said. “Because we are a small community, we are called to be more active. Everybody gets involved and works together to make it work,” he said.

Read the full article at http://www.evergreeneditions.com/article/Bishop+Helps+Sandyston+Parish+Celebrate+75th+Anniversary/2574845/334267/article.html.

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