Rutgers Rutgers Law Clinic News Fall 2016 : Page 1

CLINIC NEWS FALL EDITION | 2016 Rutgers Law Clinic Offices Renamed After Frank and Marilyn Askin P ROFESSOR FRANK ASKIN SPENT 50 YEARS AT Rutgers Law School, including founding and directing the Constitutional Rights Clinic. To honor his service, the clinical wing of Rutgers Law School in Newark was rededicated the “Frank and Marilyn Askin Wing” at a cere-mony this spring. Askin and his wife Marilyn ‘70, pulled back a curtain over the entrance to the clinics to reveal new, gold lettering that said, “Frank and Marilyn Askin Clinical Wing.” The Askins have long been supporters of the clinical education program at Rutgers Law and started the Marilyn and Frank Askin Clinical Ed-ucation Fund in 2010, which supports the clinic through conferences, publications and support of the fellows. Marilyn Askin is also a long time adjunct member of the faculty, having taught Elder Law for many years. She has also been a prominent advocate for the rights and interests of elder residents, including as President of the NJ chapter of the AARP. Chancellor Nancy Cantor of Rutgers Uni-versity—Newark presided over the event. In addition to renaming the wing at the Center for Law and Justice at 123 Washington St. after Askin and his wife, he also was presented the Rutgers University Medal, which is the universi-ty’s highest honor. The Rutgers Medal recognizes the unique and lasting contributions made by individuals to the university and to the public. The wording accompanying the medal lauded Frank Askin: “Frank Askin is a dedicated professor and civil rights pioneer. Your life of service to the university and to the community has been an inspiration and a shining example Frank and Marilyn Askin in front of the clinical wing that bears their names of the difference one individual can make. Your role in the formation of the Minori-ty Student Program helped make Rutgers Law School one of the most diverse law schools in the country. You played an integral part in the formation of the Constitutional Rights Clinic in 1970, which is widely regarded as a ground-breaking pedagogical venture and was admired and emulated by other law schools. There are now 15 clinics at Rutgers Law School and the value of experiential legal edu-cation, which you pioneered, has now become a requirement at all American law schools.” A crowd of law school faculty, staff and students, along with Askin family members and friends, cheered and clapped on the fourth floor of the Center for Law and Justice when Askin received the medal. Cantor said at the ceremony,”It is really just an incredible honor to present Frank with the Rutgers Medal.” Among Askin’s accomplishments are litigating the first police surveillance cases in the nation, battling the FBI over keeping files on two New Jersey high schoolers, defending affirmative action programs, challenging the New Jersey State Police for stopping and search-ing “long-haired” travelers, and suing the city Continued on page 2 Alexis Karteron Chosen as New Leader of Constitutional Rights Clinic LEXIS KARTERON, A SENIOR STAFF ATTORNEY from the New York Civil Liberties Union, has been hired by Rutgers Law School to lead its Constitutional Rights Clinic, taking over for the clinic’s long-time director and founder, Distinguished Professor Frank Askin, who is retiring after 50 years at the law school. Karteron previously worked as a voting rights specialist at the NAACP Legal Defense and Educational Fund and at the White House Staff Secretary’s Office, where one of her projects was working on the confirmation of U.S. Supreme Court Justice Sonia Sotomayor. She was hired after a nationwide search and joined the faculty at Rutgers Law School over the summer. “I’m so grateful for the opportunity to lead the Constitutional Rights Clinic and join the A law school’s faculty,” she said. “I’m looking forward to pitching in on the groundbreaking cases currently on the clinic’s docket, including the case seeking to establish the right to Election Day registration in New Jersey, and to develop-ing new ones that continue the clinic’s work of protecting and advancing Constitutional rights in communities around New Jersey.” Karteron is best known for her work as lead counsel in Ligon v. City of New York, one of the three recent major cases challenging the New York City Police Department’s controver-sial “stop and frisk” policy. Her case involved addressing police stops, personal frisks and the questioning of disproportionately African-Amer-ican and Latino city residents without reason-Continued on page 7 INSIDE Professor Jon Dubin Selected for the National Academy of Social Insurance .................... 2 Expansion of Camden Clinics Benefits Child Victims and Juvenile Reentry Clients ......... 2 Domestic Violence Clinic in Camden Expands Services for Victims ....................................... 3 Intellectual Property Law Clinic Has Banner Year ......................................................................... 3 Rutgers Honors Professor Robert Holmes with Human Dignity Award .................................. 4 Student Profile | Caitlin Miller ‘16 ....................................................................................................... 4 Immigration and Child Advocacy Clinics Help Child Migrants in New Jersey ..................... 5 Education and Health Clinic Wins Remedial Victory in Third Circuit Court ........................... 5 Entrepreneurship: New Evening Clinic ....................................................................................................... 6 Clinical Faculty Publications and Awards 2016 ........................................................................................... 6 CRC Advances NAACP Efforts to Enforce Voter Registration Law ................................................... 6 Rutgers Law Students Tackle Human Rights Issues .................................................................................. 7 Student Profile | Nayomi Deen ‘16 .................................................................................................... 7 Criminal and Youth Justice Clinic Scores Victories for Incarcerated Youth ................................. 8

Rutgers Law Clinic Offices Renamed After Frank And Marilyn Askin

PROFESSOR FRANK ASKIN SPENT 50 YEARS AT Rutgers Law School, including founding and directing the Constitutional Rights Clinic. To honor his service, the clinical wing of Rutgers Law School in Newark was rededicated the “Frank and Marilyn Askin Wing” at a ceremony this spring.

Askin and his wife Marilyn ‘70, pulled back a curtain over the entrance to the clinics to reveal new, gold lettering that said, “Frank and Marilyn Askin Clinical Wing.”

The Askins have long been supporters of the clinical education program at Rutgers Law and started the Marilyn and Frank Askin Clinical Education Fund in 2010, which supports the clinic through conferences, publications and support of the fellows. Marilyn Askin is also a long time adjunct member of the faculty, having taught Elder Law for many years. She has also been a prominent advocate for the rights and interests of elder residents, including as President of the NJ chapter of the AARP.

Chancellor Nancy Cantor of Rutgers University— Newark presided over the event. In addition to renaming the wing at the Center for Law and Justice at 123 Washington St. after Askin and his wife, he also was presented the Rutgers University Medal, which is the university’s highest honor.

The Rutgers Medal recognizes the unique and lasting contributions made by individuals to the university and to the public.

The wording accompanying the medal lauded Frank Askin: “Frank Askin is a dedicated professor and civil rights pioneer. Your life of service to the university and to the community has been an inspiration and a shining example of the difference one individual can make.

Your role in the formation of the Minority Student Program helped make Rutgers Law School one of the most diverse law schools in the country. You played an integral part in the formation of the Constitutional Rights Clinic in 1970, which is widely regarded as a groundbreaking pedagogical venture and was admired and emulated by other law schools.

There are now 15 clinics at Rutgers Law School and the value of experiential legal education, which you pioneered, has now become a requirement at all American law schools.”

A crowd of law school faculty, staff and students, along with Askin family members and friends, cheered and clapped on the fourth floor of the Center for Law and Justice when Askin received the medal.

Cantor said at the ceremony,”It is really just an incredible honor to present Frank with the Rutgers Medal.”

Among Askin’s accomplishments are litigating the first police surveillance cases in the nation, battling the FBI over keeping files on two New Jersey high schoolers, defending affirmative action programs, challenging the New Jersey State Police for stopping and searching “long-haired” travelers, and suing the city Of Newark for discriminatory hiring practices of firefighters and law enforcement officers. He was the leading advocate in expanding rights to free expression under the New Jersey Constitution.

He also was recognized as the longestserving general counsel for the ACLU and for inspiring law students to work for social justice.

“I’m overwhelmed,” Askin said in his remarks that night. “I’ve had 50 years of getting up every day and getting paid to do what I love to do.”

Askin has remained active at the law school, teaching classes and advising fellows at the Constitutional Rights Clinic. He retired July 1 and received Professor Emeritus status.

“Frank has been a mentor to all of us in the public interest legal advocacy community for generations,” said Rutgers Law School Co-Dean Ronald K. Chen ’83. “We were fellow members of the National Board of the ACLU, and law partners in the Constitutional Rights Clinic, and it is still a bit unfathomable to me how public interest law will fare in New Jersey without Frank’s daily presence.”

Read the full article at http://www.evergreeneditions.com/article/Rutgers+Law+Clinic+Offices+Renamed+After+Frank+And+Marilyn+Askin/2581830/336794/article.html.

Alexis Karteron Chosen As New Leader Of Constitutional Rights Clinic

ALEXIS KARTERON, A SENIOR STAFF ATTORNEY from the New York Civil Liberties Union, has been hired by Rutgers Law School to lead its Constitutional Rights Clinic, taking over for the clinic’s long-time director and founder, Distinguished Professor Frank Askin, who is retiring after 50 years at the law school.

Karteron previously worked as a voting rights specialist at the NAACP Legal Defense and Educational Fund and at the White House Staff Secretary’s Office, where one of her projects was working on the confirmation of U.S. Supreme Court Justice Sonia Sotomayor. She was hired after a nationwide search and joined the faculty at Rutgers Law School over the summer.

“I’m so grateful for the opportunity to lead the Constitutional Rights Clinic and join the law school’s faculty,” she said. “I’m looking forward to pitching in on the groundbreaking cases currently on the clinic’s docket, including the case seeking to establish the right to Election Day registration in New Jersey, and to developing new ones that continue the clinic’s work of protecting and advancing Constitutional rights in communities around New Jersey.”

Karteron is best known for her work as lead counsel in Ligon v. City of New York, one of the three recent major cases challenging the New York City Police Department’s controversial “stop and frisk” policy. Her case involved addressing police stops, personal frisks and the questioning of disproportionately African-American and Latino city residents without reasonable suspicion that the object of the stop has committed a crime. The Ligon case challenged the application of this police practice in and around private apartment buildings enrolled in an NYPD program. It found that the NYPD’s practice of routinely stopping residents and others who simply entered or exited buildings in the program violated the Fourth Amendment, a United States District Court enjoined the practice.

Karteron is a graduate of Harvard University and Stanford University Law School, where she was an editor of the Stanford Law Review and graduated with distinction. She also clerked for Judge Marsha Berzon in the United States Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit before obtaining the prestigious Fried Frank fellowship, which enabled her to work at both the law firm of Fried Frank and then the NAACP Legal Defense Fund.

Her cases also have addressed the issues of police abuse in schools, immigrant rights, and First Amendment protections, among other civil rights areas. She also has co-authored an article on the application of international human rights norms to persistent racial residential segregation in the United States and has taught at NYU’s civil rights and civil liberties law clinics since 2013.

“For more than 40 years, the Clinic has brought and won groundbreaking cases that have both protected the constitutional rights of New Jerseyans and established precedents that provide a model for other states,” she said. “The chance to become part of that tradition was too exciting to pass up.”

The Rutgers Constitutional Rights Clinic is one of the nation’s first large-case, constitutional rights teaching law clinics. Under Frank Askin’s leadership, and for over 45 years, the clinic and its students have successfully challenged unconstitutional practices in both the United States and New Jersey Supreme Courts, the United States Court of Appeals for the Third Circuit, the New Jersey Appellate Division and numerous federal and state trial courts. The clinic’s graduates include the CEOs of several non-profit, public interest organizations including Center for Constitutional Rights Executive Director Vincent Warren ‘93 and NYCLU’s Executive Director Donna Lieberman ‘73.

Read the full article at http://www.evergreeneditions.com/article/Alexis+Karteron+Chosen+As+New+Leader+Of+Constitutional+Rights+Clinic/2581831/336794/article.html.

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