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S EMIN A RY RE C TOR’ S JOURNEY FROM AS TROPHY S I C I S T TO PRIE S THOOD SUSSEX PASSAIC THE A W A RDWINNING NEW S P A PER OF THE R. C . DIO C E S E OF P A TER S ON, N.J. 6 MORRIS SEPTEMBER 29, 2016 V ISIT TO D IVINE M ERCY A CADEMY 14 7 The Catholic Center for Evangelization at Bayley-Ellard Catholic Charities is reaching out to veterans in need of social services By CECILE PAGLIARULO REPOR TER BI S HOP MEET S WITH C ONFIRM A NDI A T POPE JOHN XXIII H. S . GR A NDF A THER, FORMER OLG C P A RI S HIONER, BUILD S GOOD NEW S A PP BEACON PHOTO | JOE GIGLI 10 9 14 15 16-17 18-23 DO NOT DELAY — TIME SENSITIVE NEWS Y OUTH W HAT T O D O O BITUARIES V IEWPOINT C LASSIFIEDS Bishop Serratelli visits with kindergarten students at the new Divine Mercy Academy in Rockaway, Sept. 20, after serving as main celebrant and homilist of the 8 a.m. Mass in St. Cecilia Church, also in Rockaway. Looking on are (from left): Father Marcin Michalowski, parochial vicar of St. Cecilia and Sacred Heart parishes; Father Kevin Corcoran, the Bishop’s priest-secretary; Father Mateusz Jasniewicz, also parochial vicar of both parishes; and Father Sigmund Peplowski, pastor of St. Cecilia’s and Sacred Heart. For more photos, see page 13. St. Elizabeth Ann Seton Parish closes 30th anniversary with Bishop Serratelli’s visit By MICHAEL WOJCIK NE WS EDIT OR FLANDERS On Sept. 18, Bishop Serratelli helped close the 30th anniversary celebrations of St. Elizabeth Ann Seton Parish — a dynam-ic, rural faith community that has been under-going a spiritual revitalization recently and has experienced continued growth over its short history that has far exceeded expectations — from 200 families at its founding to more than 1,600 today. On that Sunday morning, Bishop Serratelli visited St. Elizabeth’s to serve as main cele-brant and homilist for the anniversary Mass in the church, filled with both current and for-mer parishioners. Concelebrating the liturgy were Father Stanley Barron, St. Elizabeth’s pastor since 2005 and diocesan vicar for edu-cation; Father Hernan Cely, its parochial vicar and director of religious education; and Father Kevin Corcoran, the Bishop’s priest-secretary. “The 30th anniversary celebrations and closing Mass went very well. Parishioners, who moved here later [after St. Elizabeth’s was established], experienced the roots of the parish from people who were there. They got to see how the parish was founded,” Father Barron said. “Now, St. Elizabeth’s is 31 years old. The parish has grown larger than was ex-pected. The original church already has been expanded. St. Elizabeth’s has grown because of the number of people who have moved in-to the area and because people have been at-tracted to its spirituality,” he said. St. Elizabeth’s has been giving its faith community a top-to-bottom spiritual makeover, having embarked on a major process of revi-talization that looks inward to its own rich history and legacy so far and to ways of en-riching its spiritually but also looks outward to discover new and varied ways of spreading the Gospel and welcoming new people. Taking the lead in formulating these ambi-tious plans has been Ignite, a ministry formed 30TH ANNIVERSARY on 12 PATERSON For the last few years, Diocesan Catholic Charities has been in the forefront of assisting U.S. military veterans who now find themselves in need of social services. Catholic Family and Community Services (CFCS), an agency of Catholic Charities here, has been reaching out to veterans for whatever their needs might be — from helping them avoid becoming homeless to advocating for a new veterans’ clinic in a rural area of the Diocese. Through the 2016 Bishop’s Annual Appeal, the faithful of the Paterson Diocese can assist those veterans who are seeking help from CFCS. Catholic Charities, which also includes Straight and Nar -row in Paterson and Department for Persons with Disabilities, in Oak Ridge, is one of the recipients of Ap peal donations. The Appeal also supports seminari-an education, retired priests at Nazareth Village in Chester and the Catholic school students liv-ing in inner-city areas. David Pearson, director of CFCS’ veterans programs, has assisted veterans since the pro-gram officially began. “When someone makes a difference in a veteran’s life, you are giving to someone who gave so freely to us,” he said. “The Bishop’s Annual Appeal helps our veterans and so many others in need.” Currently, there are several programs spon-sored by CFCS to help veterans and their fami-lies. In connection with the Supportive Services of Veterans’ Families (SSVF), which serves sev-en counties, CFCS works to prevent homeless-ness among veterans and to help veterans who are homeless. Pearson recalls, “I still remember my very first case at Diocesan Catholic Charities. It was helping a Vietnam vet who was homeless for many, many years.” According to Pearson, many of the vets who are seeking help from Catholic Charities are younger ones who recently served their nation in Iraq and Afghanistan and have young families. 2016 APPEAL on 2

St. Elizabeth Ann Seton Parish Closes 30th Anniversary With Bishop Serratelli’s Visit

Michael Wojcik

FLANDERS On Sept. 18, Bishop Serratelli helped close the 30th anniversary celebrations of St. Elizabeth Ann Seton Parish — a dynamic, rural faith community that has been undergoing a spiritual revitalization recently and has experienced continued growth over its short history that has far exceeded expectations — from 200 families at its founding to more than 1,600 today.

On that Sunday morning, Bishop Serratelli visited St. Elizabeth’s to serve as main celebrant and homilist for the anniversary Mass in the church, filled with both current and former parishioners. Concelebrating the liturgy were Father Stanley Barron, St. Elizabeth’s pastor since 2005 and diocesan vicar for education; Father Hernan Cely, its parochial vicar and director of religious education; and Father Kevin Corcoran, the Bishop’s priest-secretary.

“The 30th anniversary celebrations and closing Mass went very well. Parishioners, who moved here later [after St. Elizabeth’s was established], experienced the roots of the parish from people who were there. They got to see how the parish was founded,” Father Barron said. “Now, St. Elizabeth’s is 31 years old. The parish has grown larger than was expected. The original church already has been expanded. St. Elizabeth’s has grown because of the number of people who have moved into the area and because people have been attracted to its spirituality,” he said.

St. Elizabeth’s has been giving its faith community a top-to-bottom spiritual makeover, having embarked on a major process of revitalization that looks inward to its own rich history and legacy so far and to ways of enriching its spiritually but also looks outward to discover new and varied ways of spreading the Gospel and welcoming new people. Taking the lead in formulating these ambitious plans has been Ignite, a ministry formed last year, which is charged with firing up its parishioners about deepening their faith, getting involved in the parish, evangelizing through the Gospel and inviting people to Church. It put together activities for the anniversary celebrations, which kicked off Sept. 20, 2015 with an opening Mass with Msgr. John Wehrlen, founding pastor, and other priests, said Joy Rastiello, St. Elizabeth’s communications coordinator and an Ignite team member.

After the closing anniversary Mass on Sept. 18, Bishop Serratelli joined parishioners for a parish picnic. “Many of our founding families were in attendance for this celebration and all had a wonderful time sharing stories of our memories through the years. The Bishop also spent time with our Ignite Steering Committee, which gave him an update on its progress, after the first year of this parish-built program,” said Rastiello, who noted that the 40-person Ignite Team divided the spiritual makeover into four pillars or areas of focus: prayer and worship; faith formation; service and charity; and sharing our faith with others.

Among the youngest parishes in the Diocese, St. Elizabeth’s celebrated the 30th anniversary with monthly activities. They included: a presentation on the parish’s history by Msgr. Raymond Kupke, diocesan archivist and pastor of St. Anthony Parish, Hawthorne; a party for the burning of the church’s mortgage; a pilgrimage to St. Elizabeth Ann Seton Shrine in Maryland; a Habitat for Humanity construction project with youth ministry, and a family outing to a local baseball game, according to St. Elizabeth’s web site, www.stelizabethchurch.org.

“The anniversary has been a wonderful time at St. Elizabeth’s for founding families to reflect on where we came from and what they have built for us and for current members to show us, where we want to be in the future. We have a responsibility to keep growing, even as times change in the world,” said Rastiello, a longtime parishioner. She recalled when one of her children received her first Holy Communion in the cafeteria of the local elementary school before the completion of the church.

Around the time of the mortgage burning, Rastiello told The Beacon that so many families have been involved in parish life because “there’s always something going on — whether it is in our community room or the religious education programs. There is always a meeting happening.”

The history of St. Elizabeth’s started, when Catholics in the Flanders area would travel to surrounding parishes to attend Mass. In 1974, the population in the Clover Hill area grew, prompting St. Lawrence the Martyr Parish, Chester, to begin Masses and religious education classes in Mountain View School. St. Elizabeth’s was founded on June 24, 1985 with Msgr. Wehrlen as pastor. The parish acquired a house on Main Street for the pastor’s residence, administrative offices, meeting rooms, a daily chapel and a place for parish activities, according to the parish history.

As the needs grew, a seven-acre parcel of land was purchased, a capital campaign was launched and the parish house was relocated to prepare for a new church and parish facility, which was completed in 1991.

One of St. Elizabeth’s founding members, David Bishop — now president of St. Elizabeth’s Parish Advisory Board — remembers moving to the area more than 30 years ago and originally being connected to St. Lawrence Parish. Over the years, it’s been a blessing for many of the parish families to have grown up together, he said.

“St. Elizabeth’s is a family-like setting,” Bishop said. “Now, we are in the process of renewing the parish through Ignite. There is something for everyone to latch onto and be a part of. We can deepen our faith both individually and as a parish,” he said.

Read the full article at http://www.evergreeneditions.com/article/St.+Elizabeth+Ann+Seton+Parish+Closes+30th+Anniversary+With+Bishop+Serratelli%E2%80%99s+Visit/2598572/343426/article.html.

Catholic Charities Is Reaching Out To Veterans In Need Of Social Services

Cecile Pagliarulo

PATERSON For the last few years, Diocesan Catholic Charities has been in the forefront of assisting U.S. military veterans who now find themselves in need of social services. Catholic Family and Community Services (CFCS), an agency of Catholic Charities here, has been reaching out to veterans for whatever their needs might be — from helping them avoid becoming homeless to advocating for a new veterans’ clinic in a rural area of the Diocese.

Through the 2016 Bishop’s Annual Appeal, the faithful of the Paterson Diocese can assist those veterans who are seeking help from CFCS. Catholic Charities, which also includes Straight and Narrow in Paterson and Department for Persons with Disabilities, in Oak Ridge, is one of the recipients of Appeal donations.The Appeal also supports seminarian education, retired priests at Nazareth Village in Chester and the Catholic school students living in inner-city areas.

David Pearson, director of CFCS’ veterans programs, has assisted veterans since the program officially began. “When someone makes a difference in a veteran’s life, you are giving to someone who gave so freely to us,” he said.“The Bishop’s Annual Appeal helps our veterans and so many others in need.”

Currently, there are several programs sponsored by CFCS to help veterans and their families.In connection with the Supportive Services of Veterans’ Families (SSVF), which serves seven counties, CFCS works to prevent homelessness among veterans and to help veterans who are homeless. Pearson recalls, “I still remember my very first case at Diocesan Catholic Charities. It was helping a Vietnam vet who was homeless for many, many years.”

According to Pearson, many of the vets who are seeking help from Catholic Charities are younger ones who recently served their nation in Iraq and Afghanistan and have young families.

Catholic Charities also has Veteran Clothing Boutiques in three locations at the Father English Center here, the Kearny Veterans Clothing Closet and the Sussex County Clothing Boutique in Franklin. To date, through all the various programs, nearly 1,000 veterans and their families have received assistance in some way from CFCS.

Catholic Charities also co-hosts stake holder meetings in six of its SSVF counties.The group meets every six to eight weeks to discuss veterans’ services and gaps in services.According to Pearson, CFCS acts as a clearinghouse for veterans’ information and events by disseminating the information to other providers and stakeholder groups via email and social media.It also maintains a Facebook resource page that serves its stakeholders.

There are also advocacy groups — a veterans’ group to ensure that women receive benefits due them for their service and a second group that created a community- based outpatient clinic, which successfully advocated to get a veterans’ clinic in Sussex County. It is scheduled to be open in the next few weeks. Pearson told The Beacon that the opening of the Sussex County clinic is one of his greatest accomplishments he has had so far in his job and it made him realize that his work with veterans is his vocation.

CFCS also sponsors educational events for veteran resource education, such as understanding their benefits. Multiple veteran appreciation events have also be offered.

In addition to veterans, CFCS provides more than two dozen different programs between its different divisions, some of which include childcare centers, a group home for teenagers, immigration assistance, disaster relief, counseling, foster parent programs and English as a second language classes.

Christine Barton, director of CFCS, said, “At CFCS, we are the front line providing a safety net for a community of people who simply have no means. Funds that CFCS receives from the Bishop’s Annual Appeal fill in gaps to help people who have no - where else to go. Above and beyond our well-known basic needs ministries of food, clothing and housing resources, the Bishop’s Annual Appeal has helped support a single mother bury her child who had special needs; purchase new linens and supplies for families displaced by fire or other disasters; funded counseling and after school academic and sports activities for school-aged youth living in gang-involved areas of Paterson; helping to relocate individuals and families trying to get back on their feet after foreclosure, bankruptcy or eviction. It has also provided school uniforms for families who can’t afford them.There are countless examples of the fruits of this Appeal — all of them attached to real faces and names. In these cases, their needs could not be met through traditional government grants, and CFCS would not have been able to step into the gap to help them if it were not for the Annual.The Appeal helps CFCS do the work that we are called to do, fulfilling our mission of ministering to the poor and needy.”

[To make a donation or pledge online to the 2016 Bishop’s Annual Appeal, visit www.2016appeal.org or call (973) 777-8818, ext. 218 for information.]

Read the full article at http://www.evergreeneditions.com/article/Catholic+Charities+Is+Reaching+Out+To+Veterans+In+Need+Of+Social+Services/2598578/343426/article.html.

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