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The Beacon The Beacon November 3 2016 : Page 1

10-11 IT’ S VO CA TION S A W A RENE SS WEEK NOV. 612 NOVEMBER 3, 2016 SUSSEX PASSAIC THE A W A RDWINNING NEW S P A PER OF THE R. C . DIO C E S E OF P A TER S ON, N.J. MORRIS Faithful called on to speak out against state’s assisted-suicide bill By CECILE PAGLIARULO REPOR TER 15 2 The Catholic Center for Evangelization at Bayley-Ellard 2016 BI S HOP’ S A PPE A L HELP S RETIRED PRIE S T S A T N A Z A RETH VILL A GE CLIFTON The state Assembly passed a bill Oct. 20 that would allow physicians to prescribe lethal drugs to end the lives of individuals considered to be terminally ill. In a vote with 41 in favor and 28 opposed with five abstentions, the Assem -bly passed A2451, known as “Aid in Dying for the Terminally Ill Act” that would legalize publicly funded assisted suicide in New Jersey. The bill has now been taken up in the state Senate and a vote on it could be posted in the Senate as early as today, Nov. 3. The Diocesan Respect Life Office is asking the faithful to take action by contacting their elected representatives and telling them to vote against the bill. Dr. Mary Mazzarella, a retired pediatrician who serves as diocesan director of the Respect Life Office, said, “We Catholics believe that life is a gift from God and as such it is to be considered sacred from natural conception to natural death. To pur-posely cause death at either end of this spectrum is morally unacceptable. Physician-assisted suicide takes undue advantage of a person in a vulnerable state and deprives that person of more time to experience God’s grace in their lives.” If this bill becomes law, patients suffering from a terminal disease would be allowed to request lethal drugs they self-administer to end their lives. To obtain these drugs, patients would first need A2451 on 2 4 BE AC ON S TORY S P A RK S BIG FUNDR A I S ER FOR S E C OND GR A DER 6-7 14 15 16-17 18-24 Pope appoints Bishop Serratelli as member of Congregation for Divine Worship and Discipline of the Sacraments P A P A L A PPOINTMENT Y OUTH O BITUARIES W HAT T O D O V IEWPOINT C LASSIFIEDS VATICAN CITY On Oct. 27, Pope Francis announced the appointment of Bishop Serratelli as a member of the Congregation for Divine Worship and the Discipline of the Sacraments. Bishop Serratelli was the only American prelate among the 26 appointments made by the Holy Father. At present, Bishop Serratelli is the Chair man of the International Committee on English in the Liturgy (ICEL). He is a member of the Vatican’s Vox Clara Com -mis sion. He also served as co-chair of the Vatican’s International Dialogue with the Baptist World Alliance. As a member of the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops in Washington D.C., he serves as chairman of the Committee on Divine Worship. He is the past chairman and present member of the Ad hoc Sub-Committee for the Review of Scripture Translations. He is also currently a member of the Ad hoc Committee for the Review of the Catechism. He has served as past member and chair of the Committee on Doctrine, as well as past member of the Task Group on Liturgy with Children and the Com mit tee for Women in the Church and Society. Bishop Serratelli also served on the Task Force for the Review of the Lectionary and the Ad hoc Committee for the Spanish Bible for the Church in America. LONG LEGACY A contingent of students and staff from DePaul Catholic High School, Wayne, lives out their faith by participating in the March for Life in Washington, D.C. in 2015. This year, DePaul celebrates its 60th anniversary by reflecting on its long legacy of promoting scholarship, faith and family. DO NOT DELAY — TIME SENSITIVE NEWS DePaul Catholic High School celebrates 60 years of scholarship, faith and family By MICHAEL WOJCIK NE WS EDIT OR WAYNE DePaul Catholic High School here began celebrating its 60th anniversary last month to re-flect on its far-reaching legacy. During this an-niversary year, its faculty and staff have stayed focused on continuing to broaden the scope of an educational renaissance that has been taking place for six decades inside and beyond its walls. And they are powered by an intense passion to meet the ever-changing needs of its students by offering the latest in technology, curriculum and facilities. Yet, the 550 students now enrolled at DePaul, including senior Victoria Schmidt, return year af-ter year for something more than the Passaic County school’s intense pursuit of providing the best in scholarship— rooted in the traditions of its founding in 1956. Not doubt, she and the rest of her classmates also come back for its timeless core values of faith and community. “DePaul is so welcoming. We are all from different towns but become one when we are in school,” said Schmidt, an honor student, who loves history and is busy with many extracurricular activities, such as swim team; the Interact Club, which holds drives for various charities; and as president of student council and yearbook. On Oct. 27, DePaul celebrated that sense of community as a school at a Mass in the gym to open its 60th anniversary observances. Attending the Mass were current and former students, cler-gy, faculty and staff; visiting clergy; and eighth-graders from Holy Spirit School, Pequannock, where DePaul first began, and their principal, Filippini Sister Marie Antonelli. DEPAUL on 12

Faithful Called On To Speak Out Against State’s Assisted-Suicide Bill

Cecile Pagliarulo

CLIFTON The state Assembly passed a bill Oct. 20 that would allow physicians to prescribe lethal drugs to end the lives of individuals considered to be terminally ill. In a vote with 41 in favor and 28 opposed with five abstentions, the Assem - bly passed A2451, known as “Aid in Dying for the Terminally Ill Act” that would legalize publicly funded assisted suicide in New Jersey. The bill has now been taken up in the state Senate and a vote on it could be posted in the Senate as early as today, Nov. 3.

The Diocesan Respect Life Office is asking the faithful to take action by contacting their elected representatives and telling them to vote against the bill.

Dr. Mary Mazzarella, a retired pediatrician who serves as diocesan director of the Respect Life Office, said, “We Catholics believe that life is a gift from God and as such it is to be considered sacred from natural conception to natural death. To purposely cause death at either end of this spectrum is morally unacceptable. Physician-assisted suicide takes undue advantage of a person in a vulnerable state and deprives that person of more time to experience God’s grace in their lives.”

If this bill becomes law, patients suffering from a terminal disease would be allowed to request lethal drugs they self-administer to end their lives. To obtain these drugs, patients would first need to make a verbal request for a prescription to end their life from their attending physician. That request would be followed by a second verbal request at least 15 days later and one request in writing signed by two witnesses. In addition, the attending physician would have to offer the patient a chance to rescind the request. A consulting physician would then be called upon to certify the original diagnosis and reaffirm that the patient is capable of making the decision to end their life. A patient must have a terminal prognosis of six months or less to live to request and be prescribed the lethal dose under the bill. If the bill becomes law, New Jersey would be the sixth state to make assistedsuicide legal.

While supporters of the bill argue assisted suicide gives the terminally ill “death with dignity” and an end to their suffering, Dr. Mazzarella believes “instead of providing death, we should provide love and compassion to encourage patients to be aware of their dignity and self worth.”

As a physician, Dr. Mazzarella reminds all it is immoral to purposely end the life of a patient. “It is against the Hippocratic Oath I took if I provide medication to cause the death of a person or to cause an abortion.”

An area that raises red flags about the bill is the cause of death — which would be stated on a person’s death certificate as the underlying terminal illness — not suicide or self-administered drugs as the cause of death. Dr. Mazzarella said, “As a physician, it is difficult for me to comprehend how this bill justifies how a doctor can falsify the real cause of death.”

Beyond the immoral implications of allowing a patient to commit physician-assisted suicide, health insurance companies have a record in states, like California, Vermont and Oregon, where assisted suicide is legal, to have denied individuals health care for their terminal illnesses but instead offered them low-cost drugs to end their lives.

The N.J. Catholic Conference (NJCC), the public policy arm of the state’s bishops, encourages the faithful to take action against the N.J. bill.

“This assisted suicide bill is a direct threat to anyone viewed as a cost liability to an insurance company. In an era of cost control and managed care, patients with lingering illnesses may be branded as an economic liability, and decisions to encourage death could be driven by cost,” Patrick Brannigan, executive director for the N.J. Catholic Conference, said.

Assemblyman Jay Webber (R-Morris), who opposes the bill, made an impassioned plea on the N.J. Assembly floor Oct. 20 on the dangers of the bill. “This proposal for taxpayer-funded assisted suicide has a major impact on all of us, not just for the individual circumstances we might find ourselves in, but as a matter of public policy what it says about who we are as a society, and who we want to be as a society. I don’t think this bill makes our state more compassionate. When someone is reaching the end of their life and they are in pain or they are in fear and they don’t know what comes next or they don’t know what to do, I think we have an obligation to them to love them and to help them through that time, not to encourage them to prematurely end their lives.

“I don’t want to live in a state or country that gives the impression to people who are disabled, or sick, or dying that they have an obligation to end it quickly, to preserve their assets for us, or so that they’re not a burden for us. They don’t have an obligation to us, we have an obligation to them,” he said.

The bill would not require a physician to be present when a patient takes the lethal prescription. In fact, the patient does not even have to notify family members of the decision. However, two witnesses, who are not related, are required.

The NJCC also raises concerns about the message this bill sends to troubled youth and those who served the military. Brannigan said, “If we pass a law that says it is OK to end your life if you have pain what would we be telling our youth who are troubled? What would S2474 be telling our veterans suffering from post-traumatic stress disorder? Would we be saying — it’s OK to take the path of suicide?”

Dr. Mazzarella who has served for decades as a physician, said, “A six-month prognosis for a terminal illness is not always accurate, there is always hope. For those who are truly suffering with a terminal illness, as doctors we are called to make a person feel comfortable. We have become as a society too arrogant and too self centered to acknowledge the existence of God and his commandment: ‘Thou Shall Not Kill,’”

“People at the end of their lives, when they are suffering from a debilitating illness, if they have just a little bit of time left in this world, we can treat them with palliative care, with hospice care, with far greater generosity than the encouragement to prematurely end their lives,” said Assemblyman Webber to his colleagues in the Assembly. “We have better solutions. This state is better than this. I urge you to vote ‘No.’”

[For information or to send a letter to an elected representative to vote against the bill, go to www.njcatholic.org/faith-in-action.]

Read the full article at http://www.evergreeneditions.com/article/Faithful+Called+On+To+Speak+Out+Against+State%E2%80%99s+Assisted-Suicide+Bill/2629002/354188/article.html.

Papal Appointment

Pope appoints Bishop Serratelli as member of Congregation for Divine Worship and Discipline of the Sacraments

VATICAN CITY On Oct. 27, Pope Francis announced the appointment of Bishop Serratelli as a member of the Congregation for Divine Worship and the Discipline of the Sacraments.

Bishop Serratelli was the only American prelate among the 26 appointments made by the Holy Father.

At present, Bishop Serratelli is the Chair man of the International Committee on English in the Liturgy (ICEL). He is a member of the Vatican’s Vox Clara Com - mission. He also served as co-chair of the Vatican’s International Dialogue with the Baptist World Alliance.

As a member of the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops in Washington D.C., he serves as chairman of the Committee on Divine Worship. He is the past chairman and present member of the Ad hoc Sub- Committee for the Review of Scripture Translations. He is also currently a member of the Ad hoc Committee for the Review of the Catechism.

He has served as past member and chair of the Committee on Doctrine, as well as past member of the Task Group on Liturgy with Children and the Commit tee for Women in the Church and Society. Bishop Serratelli also served on the Task Force for the Review of the Lectionary and the Ad hoc Committee for the Spanish Bible for the Church in America.

Read the full article at http://www.evergreeneditions.com/article/Papal+Appointment/2629010/354188/article.html.

Depaul Catholic High School Celebrates 60 Years Of Scholarship, Faith And Family

Michael Wojcik

WAYNE DePaul Catholic High School here began celebrating its 60th anniversary last month to reflect on its far-reaching legacy. During this anniversary year, its faculty and staff have stayed focused on continuing to broaden the scope of an educational renaissance that has been taking place for six decades inside and beyond its walls. And they are powered by an intense passion to meet the ever-changing needs of its students by offering the latest in technology, curriculum and facilities.

Yet, the 550 students now enrolled at DePaul, including senior Victoria Schmidt, return year after year for something more than the Passaic County school’s intense pursuit of providing the best in scholarship— rooted in the traditions of its founding in 1956. Not doubt, she and the rest of her classmates also come back for its timeless core values of faith and community. “DePaul is so welcoming. We are all from different towns but become one when we are in school,” said Schmidt, an honor student, who loves history and is busy with many extracurricular activities, such as swim team; the Interact Club, which holds drives for various charities; and as president of student council and yearbook.

On Oct. 27, DePaul celebrated that sense of community as a school at a Mass in the gym to open its 60th anniversary observances. Attending the Mass were current and former students, clergy, faculty and staff; visiting clergy; and eighthgraders from Holy Spirit School, Pequannock, where DePaul first began, and their principal, Filippini Sister Marie Antonelli.

Today, DePaul — which has accelerated the pace of change in technology, curriculum and facilities since 2000 — educates students from about 70 municipalities and eight countries — all of various races, ethnicities socioeconomic backgrounds and religions, even though most are Roman Catholics. They make friends in class and in more than 50 clubs and in sports. Long known as an athletic powerhouse, the school’s “Spartans” have excelled on the field in several sports, snagging more than a dozen state championships.

That strong sense of community also extends to DePaul’s 11,000 alumni around the U. S. and the world, who have great affection for the alma mater. Many graduates return for visits, support the school financially and in other ways or become parents of students and graduates. Today, DePaul is educating its third generation of students.

Some alumni have returned to teach, said Joseph Tweed, DePaul’s president for the past three years. “Regardless of building and staff changes, our sense of family has never waivered. We are preparing our students not only for college but for real life. We have students from all walks of life but in here, that’s never an issue. At DePaul, we are all Spartans,” Tweed said. “DePaul has grown with the world around us. We have remained true to our mission: to prepare our students to meet the challenges and opportunities in the 21st century,” he said.

DePaul continues to make leaps forward in providing the best for its students as part of its already world-class education. It started a sports medicine program in its new athletic training and exercise area. Summer internships connect students with alumni and parents, who introduce them to such professions as medicine, business and marketing in such workplaces as St. Joseph Regional Medical Center, Paterson. DePaul offers an engineering curriculum and plans to partner with Caldwell University and William Paterson University, Wayne, to offer courses in math, English and theology for college credit, Tweed said.

Recently, DePaul updated its facilities with a $75,000 investment in providing open bandwidth for computing, with a $60,000 investment in school security and with the construction of an admissions and advancement suite. In 2014, Bishop Serratelli blessed its information commons — a suite, where students can conduct online research or study. In 2010, DePaul opened an eighth-grade prep program to prepare incoming public-school students for the Catholic-school experience.

All these initiatives continue to expand the scope of an educational renaissance that started at DePaul in 2000 with the dedication of its multi-purpose athletic field. Two years later, the school opened its “bigger and brighter” science lab suite. In 2006, the school opened Flarity Hall — the former convent. It was gutted to accommodate the new academic pavilion, which added seven classrooms, a 75-seat chapel, music and art studios and administrative offices. All the while, DePaul has kept retooling its courses, clubs and activities and wireless capabilities that enable students to use computers throughout the campus, Tweed said.

Yet DePaul’s renaissance has been built on the tireless vision and hard work all those teachers, staff, clergy and parents who have served here throughout the school’s history, Tweed said. He singled out the dedication of Msgr. John McHugh, its first director; Sister of Charity Ann Joachim, its first principal; and the Sisters of Charity, who served the school from its opening in 1956.

With great affection for the teachers, Isaac Boone, a senior, who enjoys English, plays football and belongs to the Interact Club and Sports Debate Club, said, “They are always there to help.”

For DePaul, it’s strong sense of family “always comes back to faith,” Tweed said. It helps students deepen their faith through school-wide Masses and opportunities for Adoration, Penance, daily morning Mass and pilgrimage and missionary experiences. The school challenges students to serve others, especially the poor, in its Christian Service Program. It also instills values through Stand Tall, an anonymous and voluntary student drug-screening program, Tweed said.

DePaul’s long legacy of love and learning started in September 1956 when it opened as Passaic County Catholic Regional High School. The first classes were held at Holy Spirit, before they were moved to the Wayne building on Alps Road and was renamed DePaul Diocesan High School and dedicated December 1957. Six years later a new 12- room classroom wing with guidance offices, clinic and faculty-conference room opened.

On Thursday, Nov. 17, DePaul continues its 60th anniversary celebrations with a gala at the Venetian, Garfield, at 7 p.m. The school will honor William Martin of the Class of ’64, chairman of its board of trustees, with its St. Vincent DePaul Apostle of Charity Award.

“I love this place,” said Kenneth “Chip” O’Connor, a faculty member since 1970, having taught physical education and driver’s education and coached baseball and freshmen football. “DePaul has this ambience. When you walk through the doors, you are family. It’s been a good experience for me — and the students,” he said.

[Information on DePaul’s 60th anniversary gala, call Brynn Merritt Campbell at (973) 694-3702, ext. 441].

Read the full article at http://www.evergreeneditions.com/article/Depaul+Catholic+High+School+Celebrates+60+Years+Of+Scholarship%2C+Faith+And+Family/2629020/354188/article.html.

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