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The Beacon The Beacon December 1 2016 : Page 1

13 KNIGHTS HOLD ANNUAL PRIDE IN OUR PRIESTS DINNER SUSSEX PASSAIC THE AWARDWINNING NEWSPAPER OF THE R.C. DIOCESE OF PATERSON, N.J. MORRIS DECEMBER 1, 2016 18 12 19 The Catholic Center for Evangelization at Bayley-Ellard Pequannock school marks six decades of forming students to be evangelizers BY MICHAEL WOJCIK NE WS EDIT OR MAJOR SUPERIORS OF RELIGIOUS ORDERS MEET WITH BISHOP BISHOP INSTALLS PASTOR AT SWARTSWOOD PARISH PEQUANNOCK On every day of 8-9 16-17 18 20-23 DO NOT DELAY — TIME SENSITIVE NEWS Y OUTH V IEWPOINT W HAT T O D O C LASSIFIEDS classes, the community of Holy Spirit School here, which began celebrat-ing its 60th anniversary last month, feels the loving, guiding presence of its namesake. The students say they especially feel Jesus — the greatest teacher of all — walks next to them throughout the school as they ex-plore their faith during the day with religious education, preparation for the Sacraments and frequent Masses. And with a generous gift of spirit, they share the Gospel that they have learned by helping people in need. “Holy Spirit is certainly an ap-propriate name for our school. We feel its presence through the love of the people here. Christ walks with us in the halls, because we can speak about God freely,” said Estelle Meyer, Holy Spirit’s curriculum coordinator for the past four years. “Holy Spirit not only offers students stellar aca-demics and strong faith formation but also has a community that is warm, welcoming and generous.” Students at Holy Spirit also live out their faith by taking turns to lead the school community in pray-ing of a decade of the rosary over the intercom each morning. The re-cent Jubilee Year of Mercy, which concluded Nov. 20, gave them the opportunity to explore the seven gifts of the Holy Spirit by studying Scripture and the saints. Acting on that faith, students have undertaken numerous service projects, including helping to prepare food boxes for the homeless in New York City and collecting hats, coats and gloves for the poor this winter, said Filippini Sister Marie Antonelli, principal of the pre K-3 to eighth-grade school since 1984. “We continue to grow spiritually and academically. We have the same challenges as any other Catholic school, but we have thrived because of the strong support of our faculty and staff; pastors, both past and present; Holy Spirit parishioners; parents; alumni; and benefactors,” said Sister Marie, who taught at Holy Spirit for six years in the 1960s. “We are continuing the work of the Church: to prepare our students to becoming evangelizers,” she said. During this current academic year, the 248-student school cele-brates its 60th anniversary, which started on Nov. 20 with an opening Mass, celebrated by Bishop Serratelli and concelebrated by Father David Monteleone, administrator of Holy Spirit Parish and by several priests, who currently serve or formally served the Morris County faith com-munity. Filling the pews in Holy Spirit Church at the liturgy were cur-rent and former parishioners, par-ents, staff and faculty and students. 60 YEARS on 2 Men dressed in traditional Vietnamese attire carry banners as they process for the start of a Mass to mark the 25th anniversary of the Vietnamese community at St. Cecilia Church in Rockaway Nov. 27. Bishop Serratelli was the main celebrant with several diocesan priests and visiting Vietnamese priests as concelebrants. For story and more photos, see page 14. S ILVER A NNIVERSARY BEACON PHOTO | JOE GIGLI Madison pastor sleeps on NYC streets to support homeless youth By CECILE PAGLIARULO REPOR TER MADISON Imagine facing the re-ality more than 2 million youth ex-perience each year in the United States — finding themselves out on the streets and homeless. Msgr. George Hundt, pastor of St. Vincent Martyr Parish here and a group of parishioners from Madison and other local parishes, volunteered to experience what it was to sleep out on the streets of New York City in solidarity with homeless children and youth Nov. 17. The pastor and parishioners par-ticipated in the Covenant House Sleep Out, a movement sponsored by Covenant House, which provides shelter, food, immediate crisis care and an array of other services to homeless and runaway youth. The goal of the sleep out is to give an opportunity for people to make an immediate and lasting impact on the homeless young people who live at Covenant House in cities around the U.S. and world. The 18 volun-teers from Madison, calling them-selves the “N.J. Rights of Passage Sleepers” raised more than $167,583 for Covenant House. In 16 cities around the United States where the Sleep Outs were held, more than $6.3 million was raised for Cov -enant House. Msgr. Hundt said he was inspired to participate through the words and example of Pope Francis. “He has profoundly challenged me to be with and for our brothers and sisters who are in need. He has called me to go SLEEPS ON STREETS on 6

Pequannock School Marks Six Decades Of Forming Students To Be Evangelizers

Michael Wojcik

PEQUANNOCK On every day of classes, the community of Holy Spirit School here, which began celebrating its 60th anniversary last month, feels the loving, guiding presence of its namesake. The students say they especially feel Jesus — the greatest teacher of all — walks next to them throughout the school as they explore their faith during the day with religious education, preparation for the Sacraments and frequent Masses. And with a generous gift of spirit, they share the Gospel that they have learned by helping people in need.

“Holy Spirit is certainly an appropriate name for our school. We feel its presence through the love of the people here. Christ walks with us in the halls, because we can speak about God freely,” said Estelle Meyer, Holy Spirit’s curriculum coordinator for the past four years. “Holy Spirit not only offers students stellar academics and strong faith formation but also has a community that is warm, welcoming and generous.”

Students at Holy Spirit also live out their faith by taking turns to lead the school community in praying of a decade of the rosary over the intercom each morning. The recent Jubilee Year of Mercy, which concluded Nov. 20, gave them the opportunity to explore the seven gifts of the Holy Spirit by studying Scripture and the saints. Acting on that faith, students have undertaken numerous service projects, including helping to prepare food boxes for the homeless in New York City and collecting hats, coats and gloves for the poor this winter, said Filippini Sister Marie Antonelli, principal of the pre K-3 to eighth-grade school since 1984.

“We continue to grow spiritually and academically. We have the same challenges as any other Catholic school, but we have thrived because of the strong support of our faculty and staff; pastors, both past and present; Holy Spirit parishioners; parents; alumni; and benefactors,” said Sister Marie, who taught at Holy Spirit for six years in the 1960s. “We are continuing the work of the Church: to prepare our students to becoming evangelizers,” she said.

During this current academic year, the 248-student school celebrates its 60th anniversary, which started on Nov. 20 with an opening Mass, celebrated by Bishop Serratelli and concelebrated by Father David Monteleone, administrator of Holy Spirit Parish and by several priests, who currently serve or formally served the Morris County faith community. Filling the pews in Holy Spirit Church at the liturgy were current and former parishioners, parents, staff and faculty and students.

Guided by the theme, “Crossroads in Time,” Holy Spirit has been planning events for the 60th anniversary. They include visits to its student government and home-school association by alumni, who will speak about how the school influenced their lives; a pasta dinner for alumni, who attend high school now; and a gala in fall 2017. During the school year, staff and faculty will “highlight Holy Spirit’s past with students.” Holy Spirit also continues to collect memorabilia, Sister Marie said.

“I like the friendly atmosphere at Holy Spirit. We all know and help each other. I’ve made lots of friends here. All the teachers want us to do well,” said eighth-grader Alessandra Dotzman, a student here since second grade, who serves as student government treasurer and participates in the performing arts program. Her three older siblings are Holy Spirit alumni.

Impressed with its academics, which stress “the basics,” three generations of families have sent their children to Holy Spirit. Teachers have augmented their traditional teaching methods with modern educational tools. They include a state-of-the-art science lab; up-to-date technology throughout the school, such as laptops, Chrome Books, and SmartBoards in every classroom; a media center; and the incorporation of STEM [Sci - ence, Technology, Engineering and Math] instruction. The school infuses its lessons with more opportunities for students to learn to solve problems cooperatively with adult guidance and for the older students to mentor the younger students, Sister Marie said.

“I love the small classes,” said eighthgrader Ashley Fischer, a student since pre-K, who serves as student government president, a cheer captain and participates in the performing arts program. Her two older siblings were graduated from Holy Spirit, while her two younger siblings attend the school. “I learn a lot in religion class. When Father David teaches the class, it’s interesting to see his point of view as a priest,” she said.

Over the years, Holy Spirit has greatly expanded its extracurricular programs to include art, music, computers, forensics, physics, CYO sports, cheerleading, chess, martial arts and Spanish. One of the crown jewels of its after-school activities has been its performing arts program that gives students the chance to act, dance and sing in adaptations of popular musicals, such as “Annie,” produced by professionals. Two alumni, Brian Falduto and Danielle Russell, have starred in Hollywood movies, Sister Marie said.

“The administration, faculty and students mirror the spirit of Sister Marie, who is energetic, hardworking and always concerned about us,” Meyer said. “Everyone is so cheerful. We greet each other in the halls,” she said.

Many warm-hearted Holy Spirit alumni maintain a relationship with their alma mater by returning for visits. Many graduates have gone a step further by financially supporting or lending their professional expertise for several capital improvement projects that the school has undertaken in the past, Sister Marie said.

A 1984 graduate of Holy Spirit, Deirdre Walsh could not wait for her four children to attend her beloved school. Her twins, Luke and Chris, are in fifth grade. Her 17-yearold daughter, Emily, attends Morris County School of Technology, while her 14-year-old son, Patrick, attends Morris Catholic High School, Denville.

“I have an overwhelming sense of pride about Holy Spirit. It’s a great school that gives kids an exceptional Catholic education. The amazing faculty — which includes the Religious Teachers Filippini [who have staffed the school from its opening day in 1956]— has an unwavering commitment to the students,” Walsh said. “The morals that my kids are taught at school fit with what they are taught at home.”

Placing Holy Spirit’s 60th anniversary into a religious context, Sister Marie quoted the Filippini’s founder, St. Lucy Filippini, who stated, “The Church of God is not a restful garden, but a working vineyard.”

“Today our community continues to work unceasing in the vineyard of the Lord,” Sister Marie said. “Our Catholic school prides each student with a solid moral and academic foundation so that they will be propagated to make a difference in this world. As we send forth our students, our constant prayer is that they strengthen the mystical Body of Christ and become advocates for peace and justice in our society.”

[Anniversary information: (973) 835-5680 or visit www.holyspiritschoolpequannock.org.]

Read the full article at http://www.evergreeneditions.com/article/Pequannock+School+Marks+Six+Decades+Of+Forming+Students+To+Be+Evangelizers/2653413/363468/article.html.

Madison Pastor Sleeps On NYC Streets To Support Homeless Youth

Cecile Pagliarulo

MADISON Imagine facing the reality more than 2 million youth experience each year in the United States — finding themselves out on the streets and homeless.

Msgr. George Hundt, pastor of St. Vincent Martyr Parish here and a group of parishioners from Madison and other local parishes, volunteered to experience what it was to sleep out on the streets of New York City in solidarity with homeless children and youth Nov. 17.

The pastor and parishioners participated in the Covenant House Sleep Out, a movement sponsored by Covenant House, which provides shelter, food, immediate crisis care and an array of other services to homeless and runaway youth. The goal of the sleep out is to give an opportunity for people to make an immediate and lasting impact on the homeless young people who live at Covenant House in cities around the U.S. and world. The 18 volunteers from Madison, calling themselves the “N.J. Rights of Passage Sleepers” raised more than $167,583 for Covenant House. In 16 cities around the United States where the Sleep Outs were held, more than $6.3 million was raised for Covenant House.

Msgr. Hundt said he was inspired to participate through the words and example of Pope Francis. “He has profoundly challenged me to be with and for our brothers and sisters who are in need. He has called me to go out into places where suffering exists and to be the healing and helping presence of Christ, bringing warmth and hope to young people who need it most,” said Msgr. Hundt.

At the start of the sleep out, the team from Madison gathered at Covenant House, located on the west side of midtown Manhattan near Port Authority and marched in a candlelight vigil to Herald Square listening to talks from homeless youths; and also from Brian Cashman, general manager of the New York Yankees, and Deepak Chopra, an alternative medicine advocate.

Gerard Watson, a member of the Madison team and a parishioner of Corpus Christi Church in Chatham Township, participated in the sleep out for the third time. “After we made our away back to the crisis center following the vigil, Father George gave an opening reflection that put things in perspective. I took away an important message as Father George talked about an uncertain future in the U.S. and uncertain future of the homeless — that we live in a community of caring and that we had all taken the conscious decision to be part of that community of caring.”

With a cardboard box as shelter for the night, the sleep out was more than just pretending what it was like to be homeless because it showed a group of youths unconditional love and respect. The Madison group joined 187 sleepers, mostly consisting of executives, business owners and leaders of organizations as they sleep outside of New York’s Covenant House.

Throughout the night, many of the sleepers realized how fortunate they are with health, employment and family — a contrast to the 300 youths currently staying at the crisis center.

“Perhaps the most important thing is the gift you get from sleeping out,” Watson said. “The next morning, around 5:30 a.m. we all shuffled from our spot on the street back into the crisis center where Jim White, (head of Covenant House) asked ‘Who got the gift?’ Because this was my third sleep out, I knew that the gift was the incredible feeling that you get from doing something really meaningful for someone in need. The gift is hard to explain, like a runner’s high, a warm fulfillment, a sense of wellbeing. Perhaps it is like when the Grinch experienced his heart growing three times its original size.”

Because the experience was so positive in raising funds for homeless youths and bringing awareness to the mission of Covenant House, Msgr. Hundt hopes to participate in the sleep out again.

“I felt the support of the people from St. Vincent’s as we brought awareness the weeks before about the sleep out. This was a very powerful experience and a huge outreach for so many young people in need,” he said.

Read the full article at http://www.evergreeneditions.com/article/Madison+Pastor+Sleeps+On+NYC+Streets+To+Support+Homeless+Youth/2653414/363468/article.html.

Silver Anniversary

Men dressed in traditional Vietnamese attire carry banners as they process for the start of a Mass to mark the 25th anniversary of the Vietnamese community at St. Cecilia Church in Rockaway Nov. 27. Bishop Serratelli was the main celebrant with several diocesan priests and visiting Vietnamese priests as concelebrants.

Bishop Serratelli celebrates silver anniversary Mass for Vietnamese community in Rockaway

ROCKAWAY For 25 years, Vietnamese Catholics have been coming together at St. Cecilia Church here to worship. To mark the silver anniversary, Bishop Serratelli came to the Rockaway parish and was principal celebrant of an anniversary Mass Nov. 27. The celebration began with an long outdoor procession to St. Cecilia Church, followed by the liturgy.

The anniversary was celebrated close to the feast of St. Andrew Dung Lac and his companion martyrs of Vietnam, whose feast is observed on Nov. 24. These martyrs were canonized by St. Pope John Paul II in 1988 for the witness they gave to their faith in their homeland. During the 17th to 19th centuries in Vietnam, it is estimated that some 130,000 Catholics suffered martyrdom. The feast honors 117 of those martyrs who were missionaries spreading the faith throughout the country.

The 5 p.m. Mass every Sunday is celebrated in the Vietnamese-vernacular for the Vietnamese families who are parishioners of St. Cecilia’s.

BOTTLES FOR BABIES Kathy DiFiore (second from right) of Several Sources Shelter in Ramsey was the recipient of a $4,000 donation from the Cedar Crest Com munity of Catholics (CCCC), residents at Cedar Crest, a retirement commu nity in Pompton Plains Nov. 19. Several Sources provides ex pectant mothers living quarters before, during and after the delivery of their baby. CCCC consists of about 330 residents ministered to by Father Francis Kelly who are part of Our Lady of Good Counsel (OLGC) Parish. To raise funds, baby bottles were given to those in attendance at Mass. The bottles were filled with change and/or checks specifically earmarked for Several Sources. CCCC also provides donations through the Paterson Diocese, which are distributed to St. Gerard and St. Therese parishes in Paterson, the seminarian fund and a tithing donation to OLGC.

60TH ANNIVERSARY The raising of the Hungarian flag raising at Clifton City Hall commemorating the 60th anniversary of the 1956 Hungarian Uprising against communist op - pression was held Oct. 22. Local officials and Hungarian residents of the community attended. Father László Vas, administrator of St. Stephen Magyar Church, Passaic, holds a resolution from the N.J. General Assembly, issued on the 60th anniversary of the Hungarian Revolution on Oct. 23, 1956. It pays tribute to Hungarian-Americans for their significant contribution to society.

CLOSING MASS FOR THE JUBILEE OF MERCY In Rome for the Mass at which Pope Francis officially closed the Church’s Jubilee of Mercy Nov. 20 are: (front row, from left) Dennis Rodano, diocesan project manager, who proclaimed the First Reading; Julianne Modugno, Father Geno Sylva, a diocesan priest who is an official for the Pontifical Council for the Promotion of the New Evangelization; Nicholas Modugno, Christiana Modugno and Donnalynne Studley. In the back row are (from left) are Biagio Modugno, Lou Modugno, who serves on the advisory board at St. Paul Inside the Walls, Madison; Isabella Catherine Modugno and Isabella Modugno. Lou Modugno and his family received the Apostolic letter, “Misericordia et Misera,” signed by Pope Francis expressing the Pope’s intention that the Church “can continue to live out the mercy with the same intensity felt during the entire special Jubilee.” The family attends Assumption Parish in Morristown.

THANKSGIVING FOOD COLLECTION The human concerns committee and the youth group at St. Joseph Parish in Mendham worked together on the parish’s annual Thanksgiving collection to benefit the working poor in Paterson. The groups collected 112 turkeys and six hams for the Father English Center in Paterson. The parish donated the turkeys, ham and many other non-perishable food items. More than 20 teens helped collect the items after all Masses on Nov. 19 and 20. Kevin and Emily Wood of the human concerns committee coordinated the collection.

ADVENT BEGINS Bishop Serratelli conducted a prayer service Nov. 28 in Our Lady Seat of Wisdom Oratory in the Diocesan Pastoral Center in Clifton for diocesan employees before blessing the Advent wreath. Father Kevin Corcoran, priest-secretary to the Bishop and vicechancellor, lit the first candle on the wreath for the first week of the Advent.

AFTERNOON TEA The Parsippany Columbiettes held their fifth annual tea Oct. 22 to a full house. Shown serving tea to Lisa Roberts, Cathe Nicholson and Susan Kadar who is Holley Adams, president of Parsippany Columbiettes. All proceeds from this event went to various charities and to families in need during the holiday season.

Read the full article at http://www.evergreeneditions.com/article/Silver+Anniversary/2653417/363468/article.html.

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