SNJ Today December 21, 2016 : Page 1

1 3:31 PM Page 1 0 % APR AVAILABLE Route 47, North Delsea Drive • ON SELECT 2016/2017 MODELS Happy Holidays. Our Focus Is You. 175 S. Main Road & 1234 W. Landis Avenue, Vineland, NJ • 856.690.1234 Se Habla Español Member FDIC www.toyotavineland.com Annual Percentage Rate available to buyers with approved Tier I+ through Tier I Credit through Toyota Financial. Not all buyers will qualify. Prices include all costs to be paid by a consumer except Licensing Costs, Registration Fees, and Taxes. Bank Fee ($650) and Doc Fee ($249.50) are not included. Offer expires 1/3/17. Prior sales excluded. See Dealer for details. CapitalBankNJ.com I N S I D E : GIFTS UNDER $50, PG. 20 • DEAR SANTA, PG. 22 • CHANNEL 22 SCHEDULE, PG. 23 • PRINCIPALS’ LISTS VOLUME 9 | ISSUE 46 | DECEMBER 21, 2016 A division of A to Z Holiday Savings Pg. 16 & 17 Give the Gift of Life The Vineland Rotary has hosted blood drives for 20 years. It joins several area groups sponsoring such drives through January 17 (see page 2). Homegrown Singer Songwriter Cuts Album Two local musicians put talent to work to help others. { BY TAYLOR HENRY } W Vineland Rotary Club Blood Drive organizer Ron McMahon presents Rotarian Linda Foster with recognition for donating blood consis-tently since the Club’s first blood drive in January 1997. hen the Rotary Club of Vineland hosted its quar-terly blood drive on October 25, it marked the conclusion of the club’s 20th year hosting blood drives in cooperation with the American Red Cross. The service club hosted its first blood drive in 1997. In the 20 years since the Rotary Club began sponsoring the donations, the club now has held 68 blood drives. Because Rotary now sponsors four blood drives every year at the Ramada Inn of Vineland, many people return regularly to give four dona-tions annually. Donors have included Rotarians, family members and co-workers of Rotarians, and many persons from Vineland and the surrounding communities. “We are so grateful for the continued support of the Vineland Rotary Club over the past 20 years,” said Beth Toll, external communications manager for the Red Cross Penn-Jersey Blood Services Region. “Through their efforts, more than 2,500 pints of blood have been collected.” According to American Red Cross statistics, in the Penn-Jersey Region, on average, approximately 800 donations are needed each day from area blood donors, helping to ensure that blood products are available for patients in more than 100 local hospitals, as well as about 2,600 hospi-tals and transfusion centers across the country. Long-time Rotarian Ron McMahon, who once served as a board member for the Cumberland County Chapter of the American Red Cross, has organized all of the Vineland Rotary Club’s blood drives. “It’s become a passion ever since I was nominated by then-club president Charles Parrish in 1997,” McMahon said. “After my donation on October 25, I’ve personally given blood 190 times.” McMahon’s family and friends have joined in over the years as well. In fact, last year three generations of McMahons participated in blood drives with Ron’s son Scott and grandson Ryan having made donations. Lizz Sooy carries a notebook and pen wherever she goes. Lyrics hit her when she least expects them to, and she must be pre-pared when they do. “It’s nice to get all my feelings out on a page,” she said. Sooy is a 20-year-old singer-songwriter from Millville who released an original Christmas song last week. The song, “Red Hot Holiday,” is by Sooy and her producer, Vineland-based Chris Orazi. Sooy describes it as a “brand new classic.” “People will listen and think that they've heard it all their lives,” she said. All the money generated from the song will go to Celebrating Our Veterans, which helps disadvantaged veterans. “Red Hot Holiday” is her first single to come out after her debut album. ECRWSS Local Residential Customer Continued on next page Continued on page 29

Give The Gift Of Life

The Vineland Rotary has hosted blood drives for 20 years. It joins several area groups sponsoring such drives through January 17 (see page 2).

When the Rotary Club of Vineland hosted its quarterly blood drive on October 25, it marked the conclusion of the club’s 20th year hosting blood drives in cooperation with the American Red Cross. The service club hosted its first blood drive in 1997. In the 20 years since the Rotary Club began sponsoring the donations, the club now has held 68 blood drives. Because Rotary now sponsors four blood drives every year at the Ramada Inn of Vineland, many people return regularly to give four donations annually. Donors have included Rotarians, family members and co-workers of Rotarians, and many persons from Vineland and the surrounding communities.

“We are so grateful for the continued support of the Vineland Rotary Club over the past 20 years,” said Beth Toll, external communications manager for the Red Cross Penn-Jersey Blood Services Region. “Through their efforts, more than 2,500 pints of blood have been collected.”

According to American Red Cross statistics, in the Penn- Jersey Region, on average, approximately 800 donations are needed each day from area blood donors, helping to ensure that blood products are available for patients in more than 100 local hospitals, as well as about 2,600 hospitals and transfusion centers across the country.

Long-time Rotarian Ron McMahon, who once served as a board member for the Cumberland County Chapter of the American Red Cross, has organized all of the Vineland Rotary Club’s blood drives. “It’s become a passion ever since I was nominated by then-club president Charles Parrish in 1997,” McMahon said. “After my donation on October 25, I’ve personally given blood 190 times.”

McMahon’s family and friends have joined in over the years as well. In fact, last year three generations of McMahons participated in blood drives with Ron’s son Scott and grandson Ryan having made donations.

Rotarians who donated at the Rotary Club’s first blood drive on January 7, 1997, and who are still donating regularly, include Mike Benson, Dave Schad, Ron McMahon, Gus Foster, Linda Foster and Alan Dickinson.

The Rotary Club’s next blood drive will be held on Tuesday, January 10, 2017. Anyone interested in donating during that blood drive should contact Ron McMahon by phone at 856-692-3117 or via e-mail at ronaldmcm65@cs.com.

The Rotary Club of Vineland has more than 80 members and meets on Tuesdays, at 12:10 p.m. at the Vineland Ramada Inn. For more information, visit vinelandrotary.Com or e-mail the club at info@vinelandrotary.com

Read the full article at http://www.evergreeneditions.com/article/Give+The+Gift+Of+Life/2669717/370213/article.html.

Homegrown Singer Songwriter Cuts Album

Taylor Henry

Two local musicians put talent to work to help others.

Lizz Sooy carries a notebook and pen wherever she goes. Lyrics hit her when she least expects them to, and she must be prepared when they do.

“It’s nice to get all my feelings out on a page,” she said.

Sooy is a 20-year-old singer-songwriter from Millville who released an original Christmas song last week. The song, “Red Hot Holiday,” is by Sooy and her producer, Vineland-based Chris Orazi. Sooy describes it as a “brand new classic.”

“People will listen and think that they've heard it all their lives,” she said.

All the money generated from the song will go to Celebrating Our Veterans, which helps disadvantaged veterans.

“Red Hot Holiday” is her first single to come out after her debut album.

The album, Catch Me, debuted in October after two years of writing and recording. The collection of songs was supposed to be an EP, but eventually the project turned into an 11-song album.

“It hasn’t really hit me yet,” Sooy said about releasing Catch Me. “Everybody’s like, ‘Congrats on the new album!’ and I’m like, ‘Thanks, I forgot I wrote it.’ ”

Sooy cites Sarah Bareilles, Ingrid Michaelson and Mary Lambert as her songwriting inspirations. Their influences are audible on Catch Me.

“The way that Mary Lambert writes— especially—is that she puts all of her heart into all of her music,” Sooy said. “You can hear it in her words.”

The tracks on Catch Me were all based on experiences in Sooy’s own life. “Just Friends” is about falling in love with a friend who doesn’t return the feeling. “I Should Have” is about regretting not taking a risk. Sooy wrote songs that she felt anyone could relate to.

“Everyone goes through heartbreak,” she said.

After Sooy spontaneously writes song lyrics and comes up with a melody in her head, she sits at a piano to figure out the chords to match. She tries to avoid the same four chords that make up most pop songs.

Sooy had always wanted to be a singer. She started voice and piano lessons at about five years old.

When she saw American Idol on television, she had made up her mind: “Dad, I wanna do that!” Her father, Millville City Commissioner Joseph Sooy, soon became her manager, despite having no former musical experience. Today, he rarely ever misses one of his daughter’s recording sessions.

Also at age five, Sooy started dancing at Children’s Ballet Workshop in Vineland. The first time Sooy went to the dance studio, she was too nervous to dance in front of others. But, when she went home that day, she performed the combination she learned in front of her parents.

Sooy recalled how dance teacher Sandi DiLeo taught her students to not just dance, but sing as well. Sooy attributes DiLeo, who retired this year, for helping Sooy build her confidence enough to perform in front of others.

“Lizz was one of my all-time favorite students,” said DiLeo, who taught dance for 41 years. “She was always a hard worker, dedicated in everything she did. But, in addition to that, she is one of the happiest, kindest people I know.

“I was always watching her and crying while she sang. She was that good,” DiLeo continued. Sooy performed at Children’s Ballet Workshop until she graduated high school.

Sooy also credits her great grandmother for encouraging her. As a child, Sooy sang songs for her great grandmother, who would clap along. “That’s definitely a lot of why I’m here today,” Sooy said. “Because of her.”

A student of the Millville Public School District, Sooy’s education contributed to her musical talent. From Holly Heights Elementary through Lakeside Middle School, she sang in choir.

In sixth grade, she recorded music in a studio for the first time. Her Holly Heights music teacher was friends with Orazi, who needed voices for a recording of children’s song “Buckle Up For Safety.” Sooy was recommended by her teacher to Orazi, who would produce Catch Me a decade later.

But even up-and-coming performer Sooy was a victim of school bullies. “A lot of people would laugh at me in middle school because I would sing all the time,” Sooy recalled. Some students created a Facebook page aimed at Sooy titled, “Why are you taking choir seriously? It’s not American Idol.”

Sooy later auditioned for American Idol, America’s Got Talent, and The Voice, but didn’t make it past auditions. However, Sooy didn’t let rejection or bullying discourage her.

At Millville Senior High School, Sooy joined jazz band and madrigals (afterschool choir).

“Jazz band was especially difficult for me. I was raised mostly playing classical,” Sooy explained. It was her first time playing in a band with other people, and she learned a variety of chords that now help her to keep her own music fresh.

Sooy graduated high school in 2014 and began studying musical theatre performance at the Westminster College of the Arts of Rider University. Outside of class, Sooy continues to write songs. Upon her anticipated graduation in 2018, she plans to move to New York and “audition for everything.”

“She will go very far in her career,” DiLeo said.

Catch Me and “Red Hot Holiday” can be purchased on Itunes, Amazon, or Cdbaby.com.

ALL PHOTOS PROVIDED BY LIZZ SOOY

Read the full article at http://www.evergreeneditions.com/article/Homegrown+Singer+Songwriter+Cuts+Album/2669718/370213/article.html.

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