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The Beacon Beacon_February 2 2017 : Page 1

SUSSEX THE AWARDWINNING NEWSPAPER OF THE R.C. DIOCESE OF PATERSON, N.J. PASSAIC MORRIS 3 AFTER REFUGEES BANNED, OUTCRY FROM U.S. CHURCH LEADERS FEBRUARY 2, 2017 9 The Catholic Center for Evangelization at Bayley-Ellard M ARCH F OR L IFE Massive number of marchers show the nation that ‘life is winning in America’ By CECILE PAGLIARULO REPOR TER 2 5 BOONTON SCHOOL OFFERS CLASSICAL CATHOLIC EDUCATION KNIGHTS OF COLUMBUS HOLD ANNUAL BISHOP’S NIGHT 4, 6 8 9 12-13 14-20 DO NOT DELAY — TIME SENSITIVE NEWS Y OUTH O BITUARIES W HAT T O D O V IEWPOINT C LASSIFIEDS WASHINGTON Continuing a tradition that is more than four decades strong, the 44th annual March for Life in the nation’s capital was held Jan. 27 with its one clear and strong message — that the lives of the unborn are sacred and need to be protected in the womb. The March for Life began 44 years ago fol-lowing the U.S. Supreme Court’s decision in Roe v. Wade to legalize abortion. The March for Life continues to grow yearly as marchers provide a voice for the voiceless in the womb. Under this year’s theme, “The Power of One,” the March for Life drew a crowd estimated to be close to 500,000. Prominent speakers, who addressed the crowd at the March for Life Rally that had gathered on the grounds of the Washington Monument, in-MARCHING FOR THE CHILD IN THE WOMB Parishioners from Notre Dame of Mount Carmel Parish in Cedar Knolls were out in full force to participate in the 44th annual March for Life Jan. 27 in Washington, D.C. They were among the nearly 500,000 people who came from all over the United States to be a voice for the voiceless. cluded Vice President Mike Pence, the first time a sitting vice president participated in the event. The vice president told the massive crowd that the pro-life movement is winning, urging them to fight for life with compassion and love. “We’ve come to a historic moment in the cause of life,” he added, and “we must meet this mo-ment with respect and compassion for every American.” “Life is winning in America,” he said, “and to-day is a celebration of that progress, the progress MARCH, 11 Family Service Day brings parents and students together to help others By CECILE PAGLIARULO NE WS EDIT OR HAWTHORNE Catholic Schools Week kicked off at St. Anthony School here Jan. 29 with both students and parents joining hands to help others as the school community celebrated the theme, “Be the Hands of Jesus.” Following the 8:30 a.m. Sunday Mass, students and their parents worked together side by side in the school’s gym, cafeteria and classrooms where project stations were set up to make a dif-ference in the lives of others. These projects helped the homeless, the sick, animals in shelters a local zoo, U.S. servicemen and women, veterans and reached all the way to children in Uganda. The Family Service Day was coordinated by the school’s Service Club, which consists of stu-dents grades 5-8. The students researched differ-ent organizations and decided to help several dif-ferent causes, among them. Project Linus, an or-ganization that provides homemade blankets to children in need; Sole Hope, a project that creates shoes for children in Uganda; Letters of Gratitude, part of Operation Gratitude in which students write letters that are sent with care packages to U.S. military serving overseas; Ramapo Animal BE THE HANDS OF JESUS, 10 GIVING BACK Ryan Edelbach, a second-grader BEACON PHOTO | CECILE PAGLIARULO at St. Anthony School in Hawthorne with his father, Jeff Edelbach, create a board book for disabled children at the CTC Academy.

Massive Number Of Marchers Show The Nation That ‘Life Is Winning In America’

Cecile Pagliarulo

WASHINGTON Continuing a tradition that is more than four decades strong, the 44th annual March for Life in the nation’s capital was held Jan. 27 with its one clear and strong message — that the lives of the unborn are sacred and need to be protected in the womb.

The March for Life began 44 years ago following the U.S. Supreme Court’s decision in Roe v. Wade to legalize abortion. The March for Life continues to grow yearly as marchers provide a voice for the voiceless in the womb. Under this year’s theme, “The Power of One,” the March for Life drew a crowd estimated to be close to 500,000.

Prominent speakers, who addressed the crowd at the March for Life Rally that had gathered on the grounds of the Washington Monument, included Vice President Mike Pence, the first time a sitting vice president participated in the event.

The vice president told the massive crowd that the pro-life movement is winning, urging them to fight for life with compassion and love.

“We’ve come to a historic moment in the cause of life,” he added, and “we must meet this moment with respect and compassion for every American.”

“Life is winning in America,” he said, “and today is a celebration of that progress, the progressthat we’ve made in that cause.”

Other speakers at the rally and March included Kellyanne Conway, senior counselor to President Donald Trump; Cardinal Timothy Dolan of New York; Baltimore Ravens tight end Benjamin Watson; and former Planned Parenthood director Abby Johnson.

“This is a time of incredible promise for the pro-life, pro-adoption movement,” Conway said, stressing that the pro-life movement must help women “who face unplanned pregnancies. They should know that they are not alone,” she said, “they too are protected and cared for, and celebrated.”

Throughout the Paterson Diocese, by the busloads, hundreds upon hundreds of faithful attended the March for Life and joined prolife advocates, who came from all parts of the country to march together down Constitution Avenue to Capitol Hill in solidarity to protect life in the womb.

Stephanie Zonenberg, a parishioner of St. Therese Church in Paterson, has attended the March for more than 40 years, just missing one March for the birth of one of her children. The mother of four adult children, who also has three grandchildren, said, “I’m here as a mother and I know from experience losing an unborn baby through miscarriage. There’s no question, it’s a baby and I’m here in honor of all the unborn.”

There was a huge presence of young people at the March representing high schools and colleges around the country. Many young people held signs saying, “I am the pro-life generation” and “#teamlife.” One member of the pro-life generation at the March was Joby Vargas, a high school sophomore and parishioner of St. Anthony’s in Passaic. “I like seeing so many people out here supporting life,” he said. “For a day, people aren’t thinking about their troubles and putting aside responsibilities because they feel this is an important cause.”

Also attending the March, were many Knights of Columbus from across the Diocese, who are strong supporters of the pro-life cause, and also help to sponsor some of the buses that brought the marchers to Washington. Bruce DeMolli, state deputy and a parishioner of Our Lady of the Holy Angels in Little Falls, was once again marching for the unborn. “Every year we see more and more people supporting the March,” he said. “So much is focused on pro-choice vs. prolife. Of course, we would never demean a women’s choice. People need to remember there is another choice and that is adoption.”

In Washington, right before the massive March, some diocesan marchers attended Mass at St. Peter Church on Capitol Hill celebrated by Father Michael Rodak, pastor of Our Lady Queen of Peace Parish in the Hewitt section of West Milford. He also serves as diocesan pilgrimage director. Leading a group from Queen of Peace and neighboring communities, Father Rodak said in his homily during the Mass, “As people of God, we come together to speak for life. When we speak up, we are speaking and giving a voice to each one of those children. We give a voice as one.”

Noting the Women’s March, which was held Jan. 21 with its many pro-abortion messages, Father Rodak said, “If we really love the gift of womanhood, we need to support mothers.”

With positivity and peacefulness a hallmark displayed at the March every year, Erick Borrero, a diocesan seminarian who attending his first March for Life, said, “It’s great to see so many people here. It’s something very positive for the pro-life movement and it’s especially positive for the Catholic Church.”

Pope Francis also offered his greetings to participants at the March for Life, assuring them of his prayers and imparting his Apostolic Blessing upon all present.

In a papal telegram from Vatican Secre - tary of State Cardinal Pietro Parolin, the Holy Father thanked the marchers for their witness to life.

“Pope Francis sends warm greetings and the assurance of his closeness in prayer to the many thousands of young people from throughout America gathered in the Arch - diocese of Washington and the Diocese of Arlington for the annual March for Life,” the message said. “His Holiness is profoundly grateful for this impressive testimony to the sacredness of every human life.”

The text of the telegram was included in a letter from Archbishop Christophe Pierre, apostolic nuncio to the United States, sent to Bishop Michael Burbidge of Arlington, Virginia.

The message quoted a passage from Pope Francis’ apostolic exhortation, Amoris Laetitia: “So great is the value of a human life, and so inalienable the right to life of an innocent child growing in the mother’s womb, that no alleged right…can justify a decision to terminate that life.”

Read the full article at http://www.evergreeneditions.com/article/Massive+Number+Of+Marchers+Show+The+Nation+That+%E2%80%98Life+Is+Winning+In+America%E2%80%99/2701266/380957/article.html.

Family Service Day Brings Parents And Students Together To Help Others

Cecile Pagliarulo

HAWTHORNE Catholic Schools Week kicked off at St. Anthony School here Jan. 29 with both students and parents joining hands to help others as the school community celebrated the theme, “Be the Hands of Jesus.”

Following the 8:30 a.m. Sunday Mass, students and their parents worked together side by side in the school’s gym, cafeteria and classrooms where project stations were set up to make a difference in the lives of others. These projects helped the homeless, the sick, animals in shelters a local zoo, U.S. servicemen and women, veterans and reached all the way to children in Uganda.

The Family Service Day was coordinated by the school’s Service Club, which consists of students grades 5-8. The students researched different organizations and decided to help several different causes, among them. Project Linus, an organization that provides homemade blankets to children in need; Sole Hope, a project that creates shoes for children in Uganda; Letters of Gratitude, part of Operation Gratitude in which students write letters that are sent with care packages to U. S. military serving overseas; Ramapo Animal Shelter goodie bag that includes dog treats and toys, and the Bergen County Zoo, for which they made a birdfeeder.

Raquel Jacquet, a seventh grader and member of the Service Club, worked on paracord bracelets for the military through Operation Gratitude. “I feel honored to give back to those people who served our country through the military,” she told The Beacon. “With these paracords, servicemen and women use the cords to stow gear, secure supplies and even for survival.”

Across the gym, working on another project was Ulises Salazar, who was with his daughter, Zoey, in pre-k4 and his wife, Danielle. The family was working on blankets for Project Linus. “The service day teaches the kids the importance of giving back and allows us to spend time together as a family,” Salazar said. “It is one of the things that make us happy to send Zoey here.”

To make the day a success, faculty members led the projects including AnnMarie Peterson, social studies teacher for the upper grades. She led a project called the Peace Wall. Each family was asked to create a tile to be hung on the hallway wall as a way to show togetherness and love during this special time when the school celebrates Catholic education and social justice. “We wanted to concentrate on good, compassion and loving one another. It’s an important message needed right now,” Peterson said,

Another teacher, Amy Ludke, was leading a group involved in Color a Smile, a national organization that delivers pages to retirement homes, homeless shelters and hospitals. The work is hung on walls and bulletin boards to brighten up the atmosphere and bring joy to people. “The students were all excited to come today even though it was a Sunday,” Ludke said. “They want to be involved in helping the world.”

The idea to host a Family Service Day was the brainchild of Elisa Wares, third-grade teacher. “Every year, we focus a lot on the knowledge part of Catholic Schools Week. This year we thought it was important to focus on the service part and the theme as all of us being the hands of Jesus,” she said.

In addition to the Family Service Day, Catholic Schools Week activities at St. Anthony’s included a Family STEM Night, a school-wide Catholic Trivia Challenge, a Penny Wars contest with proceeds going to cancer patients, a dance party and a “Thank You for your Service” breakfast for members of the parish and local communities.”

Liam Tuohey-Kay, a seventh-grader, called Family Service Day a rousing success, saying, “This has been a great turn out with the families from the school coming together to provide for the community and those less fortunate. The students took a lot of pride doing this and we hope we made a difference.”

Read the full article at http://www.evergreeneditions.com/article/Family+Service+Day+Brings+Parents+And+Students+Together+To+Help+Others/2701267/380957/article.html.

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