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The Beacon The Beacon_02/16/17 : Page 1

11 BISHOP ADMINISTERS CONFIRMATION TO YOUNG PEOPLE AT PASSAIC PARISH SUSSEX THE AWARDWINNING NEWSPAPER OF THE R.C. DIOCESE OF PATERSON, N.J. PASSAIC MORRIS FEBRUARY 16, 2017 Bishop dedicates $2M addition at Madison School By MICHAEL WOJCIK NE WS EDIT OR 12 5 The Catholic Center for Evangelization at Bayley-Ellard FATHER RAMA INSTALLED AS PASTOR OF BRANCHVILLE PARISH 7 ST. FRANCIS PARISH IN HASKELL COMPLETES RENOVATION OF CHAPEL 4 8-9 12 13-20 20 DO NOT DELAY — TIME SENSITIVE NEWS Y OUTH V IEWPOINT W HAT T O D O C LASSIFIEDS O BITUARIES MADISON On Sunday, Bishop Serratelli dedicated a $2 million, two-story ad-dition to St. Vincent Martyr School here. It provides six more classrooms and much-needed room for an upper-grade student population that has grown fourfold in recent years since the re-es-tablishment of the middle-school grades. The long-awaited 5,964-square-foot building, designed to “en-hance the learning” of these older students, opened on schedule on the first day of the school’s 2016-17 aca-demic year. On a stormy afternoon, Feb. 12, diocesan school of-ficials, local officials and members of the St. Vincent’s parish and school commu-nities gathered for the bless-ing and dedication ceremo-ny for the new addition. The building houses three class-rooms and also bathrooms on each of its two levels, as well as a state-of-the-art sci-ence room, ready for STEM [Science, Technology, Engin -eering and Math] instruc-tion. Located between the NEW ADDITION Bishop Serratelli dedicated and blessed a new $2 million, two-story addition BEACON PHOTO | JOE GIGLI to St. Vincent Martyr School, Madison, during a well-attended ceremony on Feb. 12. The 5,964-square-foot facility provides six more classrooms for an upper-grade student population that has grown rapidly over recent years. Above, the Bishop — led by altar server Patrick McCabe, an eighth-grader — blesses a hallway in the addition that displays painted images of buildings on the St. Vincent Martyr parish campus and landmarks around town. main school building and the parish center, the facility also features small but im-portant details, such as the choice of paint colors that are conductive to learning like yellows, greens and blues, said Sister of Charity Noreen Holly, principal of St. Vincent’s, which educates 458 students. “The new addition gives our upper-grade students a real middle-school experi-ence — all the classes are together on two floors — and provides them a better learning environment. The building is also lighter and brighter,” said Sister Noreen, who noted the students’ classrooms have decreased travel time between classes significantly and increased instruction time by at least 10 minutes per class. “The building allows our teachers and students to be more col-laborative with each other.” The classrooms enable the teachers to work togeth-er more easily. They ordered furniture unique to each classroom — with desks that can be formed in shapes, such as an “L” or “U,” or in groups — to facilitate col-laboration and participation of students, said Sister Noreen. The addition also fea-tures a new statue of the Blessed Mother with a young boy, which students will name, and a new donor wall. Also on display is a new large mural on two walls of the hallway that leads to the cafeteria — with images of buildings on the St. Vincent parish campus and landmarks around town — that replaces a former mural, which had to be de-stroyed, during construction. The eighth grade also do-nated a sign that names the new facility, “Mercy Hall, Where Faith, Hope and Charity Abide.” Each mid-EXPANSION AT ST. VINCENT’S, 10 Morristown youth hear first-hand about perils of addictions By MICHAEL WOJCIK NE WS EDIT OR MORRISTOWN On Sunday night, more than 400 young people of Assump tion Parish here and their parents caught a terrifying glimpse into the dark hell of addiction that grips so many people throughout the U.S. But they also glimpsed a bright ray of hope for themselves or people they love through the poten-tially life-saving information that they learned about drug-abuse pre-vention and recovery. On a freezing Feb. 12 evening, faithful packed the warmth of Assump tion Church for “Knowing the Signs: Addiction and Recovery — Finding the Way,” a special program that began with Mass, which features speakers, who not only imparted to the faithful the horrors of addiction but also the hope in recovery. Empha -sizing that message were Father Charles Waller, pastoral care director at Straight & Narrow, the Catholic Charities substance-abuse treatment facility located in Paterson, who gave the homily, and Adam, a Straight & Narrow client, who gave a witness talk. Meanwhile, the facility’s Gospel Choir rocked the church with re-sounding hymns of praise, during the liturgy. The sobering talk about drug and SWEET MUSIC BEACON PHOTO | MICHAEL WOJCIK Jordan Piper conducts the gospel choir of Straight & Narrow, Paterson during a Mass in Assumption Church, Morristown, that kicked off the parish’s Feb. 12 pro gram for young people and their parents, “Knowing the Signs: Addiction and Recovery — Finding the Way.” alcohol abuse continued after the Mass, during a presentation in the church that featured talks by recov-ery professionals and witness talks by other addicts, telling their har-GLIMPSE INTO ADDICTION, 2

Bishop Dedicates $2m Addition At Madison School

Michael Wojcik

MADISON On Sunday, Bishop Serratelli dedicated a $2 million, two-story addition to St. Vincent Martyr School here. It provides six more classrooms and much-needed room for an upper-grade student population that has grown fourfold in recent years since the re-establishment of the middleschool grades. The long-awaited 5,964-square-foot building, designed to “enhance the learning” of these older students, opened on schedule on the first day of the school’s 2016-17 academic year.

On a stormy afternoon, Feb. 12, diocesan school officials, local officials and members of the St. Vincent’s parish and school communities gathered for the blessing and dedication ceremony for the new addition. The building houses three classrooms and also bathrooms on each of its two levels, as well as a state-of-the-art science room, ready for STEM [Science, Technology, Engin - eering and Math] instruction. Located between the main school building and the parish center, the facility also features small but important details, such as the choice of paint colors that are conductive to learning like yellows, greens and blues, said Sister of Charity Noreen Holly, principal of St. Vincent’s, which educates 458 students.

“The new addition gives our upper-grade students a real middle-school experience — all the classes are together on two floors — and provides them a better learning environment. The building is also lighter and brighter,” said Sister Noreen, who noted the students’ classrooms have decreased travel time between classes significantly and increased instruction time by at least 10 minutes per class. “The building allows our teachers and students to be more collaborative with each other.”

The classrooms enable the teachers to work together more easily. They ordered furniture unique to each classroom — with desks that can be formed in shapes, such as an “L” or “U,” or in groups — to facilitate collaboration and participation of students, said Sister Noreen.

The addition also features a new statue of the Blessed Mother with a young boy, which students will name, and a new donor wall. Also on display is a new large mural on two walls of the hallway that leads to the cafeteria — with images of buildings on the St. Vincent parish campus and landmarks around town — that replaces a former mural, which had to be destroyed, during construction. The eighth grade also donated a sign that names the new facility, “Mercy Hall, Where Faith, Hope and Charity Abide.” Each mid-dle-school class has accepted the challenge of embodying one of those virtues throughout the rest of the year, Sister Noreen said.

The dedication was held in the gym of St. Vincent’s School, which has been serving as the parish’s main worship area while the church undergoes major renovations. Many students participated in the ceremony, singing in the student choir and leading the assembly in the Prayers of the Faithful. The dedication took place a little more than a year after the groundbreaking for the projects — also lead by Bishop Serratelli — in January 2016, Sister Noreen said.

“The new building has more space. We now the middleschool students have two floors to themselves, which makes everything easier,” said Mary McKenna, an eighth-grader, president of the Student Council and a fourth-generation St. Vincent’s student in her family. “It’s new and pretty. It’s brighter, because it has more windows. I love it!” she said.

Among the dignitaries who attended Sunday’s groundbreaking were Diocesan School Superintendent Mary Baier; Sister Rosemary Moynihan, general superior of the Sisters of Charity, who have staffed the school since it opened; along with members of the school Task Force that oversaw the project; contractors and designers

The expansion of St. Vincent’s that necessitated the new addition started in 2009, when the school reopened the sixth grade, followed by the re-establishment of its seventh and eighth grades in 2010. St. Vincent’s made room on its lower level under the stage for two seventh-grade homerooms, and an eighth-grade homeroom. Other middle school classes were spread throughout the building. Originally, the school closed the middle-school grades in the early 1990s, said Barbara Doyle, a former St. Vincent’s principal and leader of the Task Force; who also led the fundraising effort for the addition.

The Task Force — which also included Doyle; Sister Noreen; Msgr. George Hundt, pastor; Anne Marie Gisoldi, vice principal; Kieran Flanagan; Ernie Turner; and Keith Amling — met weekly during construction with the architects and the plant manager, Doyle said.

“The dedication was wonderful. It was a great celebration,” Msgr. Hundt said. “The new addition serves St. Vincent School well. It provides a focused environment for sixththrough eighth-grade students so they can have their classes together and feel connected to each other. It gives them a middle-school experience while they still feel a part of the entire school,” he said.

Read the full article at http://www.evergreeneditions.com/article/Bishop+Dedicates+%242m+Addition+At+Madison+School/2711921/384256/article.html.

Morristown Youth Hear First-Hand About Perils Of Addictions

Michael Wojcik

MORRISTOWN On Sunday night, more than 400 young people of Assump tion Parish here and their parents caught a terrifying glimpse into the dark hell of addiction that grips so many people throughout the U.S. But they also glimpsed a bright ray of hope for themselves or people they love through the potentially life-saving information that they learned about drug-abuse prevention and recovery.

On a freezing Feb. 12 evening, faithful packed the warmth of Assump tion Church for “Knowing the Signs: Addiction and Recovery — Finding the Way,” a special program that began with Mass, which features speakers, who not only imparted to the faithful the horrors of addiction but also the hope in recovery. Empha - sizing that message were Father Charles Waller, pastoral care director at Straight & Narrow, the Catholic Charities substance-abuse treatment facility located in Paterson, who gave the homily, and Adam, a Straight & Narrow client, who gave a witness talk. Meanwhile, the facility’s Gospel Choir rocked the church with resounding hymns of praise, during the liturgy.

The sobering talk about drug and alcohol abuse continued after the Mass, during a presentation in the church that featured talks by recovery professionals and witness talks by other addicts, telling their har-rowing stories. They delivered a powerful message: do not start down the dark road of addiction, but if you do, there is help available for you. Speakers also shared tips about prevention with the young people at Assumption — sixth- to eight-graders and Confirmation students — and their parents in the pews. Their stirring talks took place as New Jersey and the rest of the nation tries to come to grips with a widespread epidemic of addiction to prescription painkillers, called opioids.

“Drugs take your soul, your morals and your self-respect. I devalued my life [when addicted]. Today, I value my life. What I did to my family — it’s hard to forgive myself,” said Valerie, whose last name withheld, who drank and took heroin. It was part of a spiraling addiction that led to committing crimes and spending some time in jail, before entering treatment at Straight & Narrow 13 months ago. “If you are playing with drugs or are suffering from this disease, you are walking into a world that you don’t want to know. The journey is hard and long and not everyone makes it,” she told the young people at the after-Mass presentation.

The congregation first heard the story of Adam, his last name also withheld, another Straight & Narrow client, at the end of the Mass, that was celebrated by Father Waller; Msgr. John Hart, Assumption’s pastor; and Father Przemyslaw Nowak, the parish’s parochial vicar. The speaker announced that he has been sober for six months — but only after many years of drug abuse that also led to criminal activity and incarceration. A child of addicts, he drank, smoked marijuana and later took opioids, which led to heroin use, which is cheaper. After his latest scrape with the law, the judge offered him N.J. Drug Court, which urges defendants to seek treatment over “doing time.”

“It [Drug Court] gives me the tools to live a clean and sober life — a better life. Now, I feel better than I ever in my life,” Adam told the congregation.

During his homily, Father Waller noted that recovering addicts often deal with feelings of anger and bitterness about their past lives but ultimately chose forgiveness — of themselves and others. He said that Straight & Narrow — the largest facility of its kind in the state — provides treatment for about 120 men and 100 women and offers services, including parenting-skills classes, apartments for clients and former clients with HIV/AIDS and the Intoxicated Driver Resource Center, he said.

During the Presentation of the Gifts at Mass, students from Assumption’s Catechesis of the Good Shepherd program presented backpacks that they assembled. They packed the backpacks with socks, shirts and assorted toiletries for Straight & Narrow clients and wrote prayers and sentiments of good wishes on the outside of them.

After the Mass, Msgr. Hart introduced the program of speakers, emphasizing the purpose of the program: “We are here to try to understand addiction that has become an epidemic in our country.” He had visited Valerie in jail and gave her absolution for her sins.

Bill Lillis, parent educator coordinator for the Partnership for a Drug-Free New Jersey, gave the following addiction prevention tips to parents: ask doctors for an alternative if they prescribe an opioid, keep an eye on their liquor and medicine cabinets, dispose of unused medications and schedule regular mealtimes as a family. He told the young people that avoiding drugs and alcohol can save not only their own lives, but also the lives of their friends and loved ones.

Ellen Purtell, clinical director at Daytop, Mendham, which treats adolescents and adults, suggested that children do their part in prevention by helping make fellow students feel less isolated by inviting them to sit with them at their lunch tables and avoid cyber-bullying, bullying using social media.

“This [in the recovery field] is God’s work, but the other side [of evil] is pulling a tough team,” Purtell said. “Be kind to each other. Love is a powerful force. You can be a positive force for prevention,” she said.

Father Nowak closed the program by telling the young people and parents, “Assumption will do anything to save a child. Come to see us. The Church is here.”

After the program, Gale Grennan, an Assumption catechist, declared, “I loved it,” and expressed her pride in her parish for “inviting people from Straight & Narrow to come and speak.”

“I felt great joy for their [the speakers’] recovery. I’m glad that they shared their stories to help prevent it [addiction] from happening to other people,” said Grennan, who attended with her three children: Hugh, 17; Dermot, 15; and Maeve, 12. “One speaker suggested that parents have regular dinner with their kids, which we do. I feel good about that,” she said.

Dermot Grennan, a sophomore at Morris - town High School, noted that his parents “have always done a good job talking to us about drugs — don’t do them, because they’re bad.”

“The talks [as part of the program] were eye-opening. It was interesting that one speaker’s parents had addictions and others saw it [taking drugs and drinking] as a rite of passage,” Grennan said. “It shows you that no one is safe, but that help is available,” he said.

Read the full article at http://www.evergreeneditions.com/article/Morristown+Youth+Hear+First-Hand+About+Perils+Of+Addictions/2711931/384256/article.html.

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