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SUSSEX THE AWARDWINNING NEWSPAPER OF THE R.C. DIOCESE OF PATERSON, N.J. PASSAIC MORRIS 7 LIFE RUNNERS TO TAKE PART IN ASH WEDNESDAY RELAY FOR LIFE FEBRUARY 23, 2017 12 The Catholic Center for Evangelization at Bayley-Ellard Professor tells Catholics to ‘remain vigilant’ in protecting, promoting religious freedom By MICHAEL WOJCIK NE WS EDIT OR ‘M OR A L T RUTH M A TTER S ’ INSTALLS PASTOR AT 10 BISHOP RINGWOOD PARISH RANDOLPH PARISHIONERS AID BUILDING OF HOSPITAL IN HAITI CONFIRMATION RETREAT Bishop Serratelli met with high school students from parishes BEACON PHOTO | JOE GIGLI 11 across the Diocese who are preparing for the Sacrament of Confirmation at a retreat Feb. 19 in DePaul Catholic High School, Wayne. Pictured are some of the candidates singing the popular “praise and worship” song, “Trading My Sorrows.” For story and more photos, please turn to page 2. 8-9 10 12 13-20 20 DO NOT DELAY — TIME SENSITIVE NEWS V IEWPOINT Y OUTH W HAT T O D O C LASSIFIEDS O BITUARIES Charity set up by students at Morristown school to buy ambulance for Tanzanian clinic By MICHAEL WOJCIK NE WS EDIT OR MADISON Catholics and other concerned be-lievers, remain vigilant! The sustained attacks that the Obama Administra tion launched against the positions of the Church and other religions about matters of conscience and religious freedom through over-reaching legislation over the past eight years con-tinue today by increasingly hostile liberal and secularist sectors of society. That’s why Robert George, a professor at Princeton University, urged Catholics to “remain vigilant” in promoting and protecting religious freedom — and their faith-based understanding of conscience — against forces that “seek to diminish it, especially when those threats come from overreaching govern-ments.” Called “the Christian-Conservative big thinker” by the New York Times, George spoke about “Conscience and Its Enemies: Why Moral Truth Matters” to about 100 members of the public and of Advocati Christi, the Diocesan fellowship to Catholic lawyers, on Feb. 15 at St. Paul Inside MORRISTOWN The Imiliwaha Health Center the Njombe region of Tanzania faces a formidable task: serving 16 impoverished villages that are stretched out over 4,000 square miles in a remote, mountainous area half the size of New Jersey. It’s tough for people in the U.S. to imagine that HELPING HAND James Smart, a senior at Delbarton School, Morris -own, spends time with local child, while on a mission service trip with Benedictines to the impoverished region of Njombe in Tanzania a few years ago. He founded Project Imakulata to raise money to purchase an ambulance for a health clinic in the region. the villagers must walk nearly 50 miles for health-care — even emergency treatment. Coming to the rescue of people of Njombe is James Smart, a senior at Delbarton School here, and a team of fellow students, who run Project Imaku lata, a non-profit initiative to raise money to purchase an ambulance for the community that will not be able to cut the distance from the villages to the clinic, but will greatly reduce travel time. So far, the new outreach has raised one-third of the esti-mated $30,000 for a used Toyota Land Cruiser. Smart anticipates to raise the rest of the funds by May and to deliver to the health center by the next month. “It’s a different experience in Tanzania. We have many options for healthcare but the people there don’t,” said Smart of Immaculate Conception Parish in Annandale, who stayed with Benedictine Monks in 2015 dur-CHARITY, 6 Religion … represents our ‘ being able to be brought into friendship and harmony with transcendent sources of meaning and value.’ — R OBERT G EORGE the Walls: the Diocese’s Center for Evangelization at Bayley-Ellard here. He delivered his engaging hour-long presentation to a standing-room-only audience in one of the center’s classrooms, fo-cusing on matters of conscience and religious freedom through the writings of two prominent 19th century thinkers: John Stuart Mill and John Henry Newman. “Freedom of religious has a certain priority — a private place [in society]. It protects an aspect of our flourishing as human persons. Religion is a great good — the asking of exis-MORAL TRUTH, 4

Charity Set Up By Students At Morristown School To Buy Ambulance For Tanzanian Clinic

Michael Wojcik

MORRISTOWN The Imiliwaha Health Center the Njombe region of Tanzania faces a formidable task: serving 16 impoverished villages that are stretched out over 4,000 square miles in a remote, mountainous area half the size of New Jersey. It’s tough for people in the U.S. to imagine that the villagers must walk nearly 50 miles for healthcare — even emergency treatment.

Coming to the rescue of people of Njombe is James Smart, a senior at Delbarton School here, and a team of fellow students, who run Project Imaku lata, a non-profit initiative to raise money to purchase an ambulance for the community that will not be able to cut the distance from the villages to the clinic, but will greatly reduce travel time. So far, the new outreach has raised one-third of the estimated $30,000 for a used Toyota Land Cruiser. Smart anticipates to raise the rest of the funds by May and to deliver to the health center by the next month.

“It’s a different experience in Tanzania. We have many options for healthcare but the people there don’t,” said Smart of Immaculate Conception Parish in Annandale, who stayed with Benedictine Monks in 2015 during a mission trip to Njombe, and has since founded Project Imakulata. “This impacts people halfway around the world. We want to make a difference,” he said.

Project Imakulata has been collaborating with the East Africa Ambulance Pro - ject, a non-profit organization, founded in 2009 to bring custom-made ambulances to areas of Africa that can utilize them as mobile clinics and emergency evacuation vehicles. Smart has been collaborating with Mike Carr and Brain Theroux, who run the project and teach at Delbarton, run by Benedic - tines. Three fellow students have been assisting Smart: Liam McSorley of St. Mat - thew the Apostle Parish, Randolph; Sean Taylor of St. Vincent Martyr Parish, Madi - son; and Andrew Ba den - hausen of Immaculate Con - cep tion Parish, Montclair. Neither Project Imakulata nor the East Africa Ambu lance Project is an official charity of Delbarton. All four students have been soliciting friends, family, parishioners at their respective faith communities and others, Smart said.

Benedictine Sisters operate the Imiliwaha Health Center, which provides basic health care for thousands of men, women and children every year. It admits about 800 women each year to its labor ward and offers comprehensive dental care and confidential HIV counseling and testing. Smart visited the clinic, along with a Bene - dictine-run school and an orphanage, during a service trip with an outreach, Bene - dictines East Africa and Del - barton School (BEADS), now 10 years old, he said.

“It’s amazing that the Benedictines there can to so much [with so little]. They deal with so many struggles of daily life,” said Smart, who with other missioners, shadowed the workers of the clinic, school and orphanage to take stock of their needs. “The birthing center has no electricity. The women give birth by candlelight. Many kids have been abandoned or neglected. Children automatically hold your hand. Benedictine Sisters found kids a dumpster,” he said.

In a rural and impoverished Africa, ambulances provide transportation to medical facilities — like in the U.S. — but also can provide primary preventative care, pre- and post-natal care, vaccinations and geriatric care. A while back, the East Africa Ambulance Pro - ject bought an ambulance for a health clinic in Kenya, where BEADS also conducted serve trips, said Smart, who noted that he might return to Tanzania this summer.

“On our trip to Tanzania, we learned that we were there to experience it, learn what the people need and carry that with us. We are here to change this,” Smart said.

Taylor traveled to Tan - zania in 2016. Missioners purchased a battery-powered microscope, so the clinic, which has no electricity, could make quick diagnoses for diseases, such as for malaria, which can be cured if caught early. The new ambulance also will help patients, who are suffering from these diseases, by transporting them to the clinic more quickly, Taylor said.

“Life is so different there in Tanzania than in Madison. Most of the kids wear the same clothes day after day. They played soccer by kicking around bunched up plastic bags, until we gave them a real soccer ball,” said Taylor, who plans to travel to Guate - mala with Houses to Homes. “With Project Imaku lata, we want to get the word out and tell people about our experiences and what we are trying to accomplish. We are in a position to impact people’s lives,” he said.

‘It’s amazing that the Bene - dictines there can to so much [with so little]. They deal with so many strug - gles of daily life.’

— JAMES SMART

TO THE RESCUE

Left: Sister Imakulata helps a patient at the Imiliwaha Heath Center in the Njombe region of Tanzania. James Smart, a senior at Delbarton School, Morristown, founded Project Imakulata to raise funds to purchase an ambulance for the clinic in partnership with the East Africa Ambulance Project of Mendham. Below: The Chesongoch Health Dispen - sary in Kenya established a mobile clinic, due to the purchase of an ambulance made possible by the East Africa Ambulance Project.

Read the full article at http://www.evergreeneditions.com/article/Charity+Set+Up+By+Students+At+Morristown+School+To+Buy+Ambulance+For+Tanzanian+Clinic/2717495/385874/article.html.

‘Moral Truth Matters’

Michael Wojcik

Professor tells Catholics to ‘remain vigilant’ in protecting, promoting religious freedom

MADISON Catholics and other concerned believers, remain vigilant!

The sustained attacks that the Obama Administra tion launched against the positions of the Church and other religions about matters of conscience and religious freedom through overreaching legislation over the past eight years continue today by increasingly hostile liberal and secularist sectors of society. That’s why Robert George, a professor at Princeton University, urged Catholics to “remain vigilant” in promoting and protecting religious freedom — and their faithbased understanding of conscience — against forces that “seek to diminish it, especially when those threats come from overreaching governments.”

Called “the Christian-Conservative big thinker” by the New York Times, George spoke about “Conscience and Its Enemies: Why Moral Truth Matters” to about 100 members of the public and of Advocati Christi, the Diocesan fellowship to Catholic lawyers, on Feb. 15 at St. Paul Inside the Walls: the Diocese’s Center for Evangelization at Bayley-Ellard here. He delivered his engaging hour-long presentation to a standing-room-only audience in one of the center’s classrooms, focusing on matters of conscience and religious freedom through the writings of two prominent 19th century thinkers: John Stuart Mill and John Henry Newman.

“Freedom of religious has a certain priority — a private place [in society]. It protects an aspect of our flourishing as human persons. Religion is a great good — the asking of existential questions, a spiritual quest and the work to identify the truth and to live in line with one’s best judgment of the truths — or truth — in these matters,” said George, the McCormick Chair in Jurisprudence and founding director of the James Madison Program in American Ideals and Institutions at Princeton University. “Newman believed in conscience to help us realize values that promote the flourishing of men and women as free and rational creatures — made in the image and likeness of God, the free and rational creator of the universe,” he said.

George spoke as part of an ongoing lecture series at St. Paul’s by notable religious and legal minds about faith and the law. Sponsoring the series is Advocati Christi, a diocesan fellowship of lawyers and judges who are committed to the profession their faith. During his presentation, George spoke about the importance of faith in the lives of lawyers — and all believers.

“Our professional life as lawyers is, in part, shaped by our faith commitments. Religion concerns ultimate things. It represents our being able to be brought into friendship and harmony with transcendent sources of meaning and value. It shapes not only what we do in the religious aspects of our lives — prayer, liturgy and fellowship — but also in every aspect of our lives,” said George, who used material from his book, “Conscience and Its Enemies: Why Moral Truth Matters.” “Religion, including Catholicism, helps us view our lives as an integrated whole and direct our choices and activities that have integrity, not just in a moral sense, but in a broader sense by having a life that hangs together — that makes sense,” the speaker said.

George talked about the importance of defending religious freedom and conscience — this after the Obama Administration mounted challenges to those principles with legislation, such as the Affordable Care Act (ACA). The law includes a mandate that employers, including religious institutions, provide healthcare coverage of abortion-inducing drugs, sterilizations and artificial contraceptives. The Church and other religious institutions — including the Little Sisters of the Poor, who run St. Joseph’s Home for the Elderly in Totowa — argued that offering such coverage violated the tenets of their faith. The administration prevailed in the courts, arguing that the mandates protected a woman’s freedom and rights of conscience. President Donald Trump and Republican lawmakers have vowed to repeal “Obamacare,” George said.

For some context, George noted that Mill, a secular humanist, advanced what has become known as the “No Harm” principle that’s popular today: people should be free to do whatever they want as long as it does not hurt anybody. By contrast, Newman, a Catholic convert, believed that society needed to place restraints on people, “so they do not descend into vice and degradation” and noted that conscience “speaks of what one must do or one must not do,” he said.

George’s event started with a 5:30 p.m. Mass in St. Paul’s chapel, followed by 6 p.m. cocktail hour and conversation. It continued with a 7 p.m. presentation and an 8 p.m. gathering of fellows of the Outreach for Lawyers, including private dinner with the speaker and discussion. Lawyers were eligible to earn Continuing Legal Education (CLE) credits for attending.

Introducing George’s talk, Mark Scirocco, a lawyer and chairman of the event’s steering committee, called the speaker, “one of the foremost stewards and defenders of western civilization in the public square today for Christians and conservatives, who seek to engage the modern world on hotbutton moral and social issues.” He said the featured speaker “knows that there is an answer to the problems of the modern world and that that answer is Jesus of Nazareth,” Scirocco said.

“I’m feeling more thoughtful, catching glimpses of the coherent truth that Professor George knows and defends,” said Father Paul Manning, St. Paul’s executive director and diocesan vicar for evangelization, after the presentation. “I am grateful to him as we all are.”

This year’s Advocati Christi speakers’ series continues on Wednesday, March 15 with U.S. Supreme Court Justice Samuel Alito Jr.: and then Tuesday, April 25 with Father Paul Scalia, Bishop’s Delegate for Clergy and head of the Clergy Personnel Board in the Diocese of Arlington, Va., and son of the late U.S. Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia.

The cost of each talk is $35 for the cocktail hour, presentation and CLE credits; $25 for the cocktail hour and presentation; $25 for the presentation and CLE credits; and $15 for the presentation.

Religion ... represents our ‘ being able to be brought into friendship and harmony with
transcendent sources of meaning and value.’
— ROBERT GEORGE

Read the full article at http://www.evergreeneditions.com/article/%E2%80%98Moral+Truth+Matters%E2%80%99/2717499/385874/article.html.

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