SNJ Today Grapevine_March 8 2017 : Page 1

NEW 2017 HONDA Automatic ACCORD SEDAN LX CVT UP % APR TO 60 6 AVAIL. 0 AVAILABLE MONTHS M A D N E S S S A L E $ LEASE FOR ONLY PER MONTH • 36 MONTHS YOUR CHOICE 119 Automatic CVT NEW 2017 HONDA CIVIC SEDAN LX Se Habla Español 856-692-1700 1517 South Delsea Drive, Vineland 14 AVAIL. We Treat You Better ...Period I N S I D E : LIFE SENTENCES, PG. 20 • REAL ESTATE TRANSACTIONS, PG. 10 • CH. 22 SCHEDULE, PG. 15 • PRINCIPALS’ LISTS, PG. 22 VOLUME 10 | ISSUE 5 | MARCH 8, 2017 A division of The Vineland Regional Dance Company performs new pieces March 12. See pg 16. Restoring Sight Local ophthalmologist performs cataract surgeries and other eye procedures in Cambodia. For Folk’s Sake From the music of Woody Guthrie to Bob Dylan, and from bluegrass to New Grass, author Michael Gabriele examines the history of New Jersey’s folk revival music in fascinating new book—interview inside. { BY JEFF SCHWACHTER } Looking for “untold” stories is what drives author Michael Gabriele. In the long-time journalist’s latest book, New Jersey Folk Revival Music: History & Tradition, his third for The History Press, the life-long Garden State resi-dent, 1975 graduate of Montclair University, folk-music fan, and “recreational” tenor sax player, uncovers several (rollin’) stones relat-ed to the important role that New Jersey has played in shaping folk revival music into an art form. Gabriele (un)covers terrific stories and information about the Garden State’s long history— over thousands of years’ worth—as it relates to folk music. From the traditional music of the Lenni-Lenape tribe in Bridgeton, and songs of Colonial-era taverns, to a “Guitar Mania” that swept the region in the early 1800s, Bob Dylan’s first meeting with folk icon Woody Guthrie in East Orange in 1961, and one of Dylan’s early appearances at the Camden Music Fair in 1963, Gabriele con-nects the dots between New Jersey and what W Patients lined up at Children's Surgical Center in Phnom Penh, Cambodia. ABOVE RIGHT: Karl A. Holzinger, M.D. examines the eyes of a patient in Cambodia. orking with the Children’s Surgical Center, or CSC, in Phnom Penh, Cambodia, Karl. A Holzinger, M.D. and a team performed a total of 75 surgeries along with 400 or more during the week they were there. “Before joining our team of surgeons here at Eye Associates, Dr. Holzinger served as Chief of Ophthalmology in the Navy,” says the president of Eye Associates, Sydney L. Tyson, M.D., M.P.H.. Holzinger has participated in 45 missions in 15 different countries over his career as an ophthalmologist. During his time serving in the Navy as Ophthalmology Department Chief, he worked in several surgical centers in Honolulu, which is where he became friends with Britain native and founder of Children’s Surgical Center, Dr. Jim Gollogly. Gollogly set up the CSC in Phnom Penh, Cambodia, in 1998. The original purpose was to address injuries that occurred from landmines laid during the Vietnam War. Now being a robust eye program, CSC provides free care for poor residents. CSC addresses eye problems and trau-ma including cataracts, oculoplastics, and pediatric issues such as tumors, strabismus, and pediatric cataracts. Gollogly and the CSC were even featured in a BBC docu-mentary. “I started working with Jim when I was in the Navy,” says Holzinger, “working several times in Cambodia, but in more remote areas between 2002 and 2007. Jim’s organiza-tion would provide nurses and usually one or two ophthal-mologists in training.” “We did cataract surgery mostly," says Gollogly. “Patients generally could only see shadows before surgery and needed help walking because the cataracts were so advanced.” ECRWSS Local Residential Customer Continued on page 4 Continued on page 6

Restoring Sight

Local ophthalmologist performs cataract surgeries and other eye procedures in Cambodia.

Working with the Children’s Surgical Center, or CSC, in Phnom Penh, Cambodia, Karl. A Holzinger, M.D. and a team performed a total of 75 surgeries along with 400 or more during the week they were there.

“Before joining our team of surgeons here at Eye Associates, Dr. Holzinger served as Chief of Ophthalmology in the Navy,” says the president of Eye Associates, Sydney L. Tyson, M.D., M.P.H..

Holzinger has participated in 45 missions in 15 different countries over his career as an ophthalmologist. During his time serving in the Navy as Ophthalmology Department Chief, he worked in several surgical centers in Honolulu, which is where he became friends with Britain native and founder of Children’s Surgical Center, Dr. Jim Gollogly.

Gollogly set up the CSC in Phnom Penh, Cambodia, in 1998. The original purpose was to address injuries that occurred from landmines laid during the Vietnam War. Now being a robust eye program, CSC provides free care for poor residents. CSC addresses eye problems and trauma including cataracts, oculoplastics, and pediatric issues such as tumors, strabismus, and pediatric cataracts. Gollogly and the CSC were even featured in a BBC documentary.

“I started working with Jim when I was in the Navy,” says Holzinger, “working several times in Cambodia, but in more remote areas between 2002 and 2007. Jim’s organization would provide nurses and usually one or two ophthalmologists in training.”

“We did cataract surgery mostly," says Gollogly.

“Patients generally could only see shadows before surgery and needed help walking because the cataracts were so advanced.”

After retiring from the Navy in 2007, Holzinger returned to Cambodia just once in 2010. Then he joined Eye Associates & the SurgiCenter of Vineland while attending other missions in India, Ghana, and Indonesia.

“These missionary trips were great, but I always wanted to go back to Cambodia,”

Says Holzinger. “The Cambodian people went through such atrocities during the Khmer Rouge rule. It is especially rewarding to be able to help in any little way I can.”

Missionary trips are important to Holzinger because the people he helps would never be able to see a doctor of his kind.

“The people we treat on these trips would never in their lifetimes have any access to an ophthalmologist,” says Holzinger. “As people age, they just expect to go blind. The fact that we are able to give sight to these patients is the most rewarding thing I could ever do as an ophthalmologist. The surgeries are completely free for these patients through CSC.”

Eye Associates and SurgiCenter of Vineland has offices in five locations. Vineland office 856-691-8188, Cherry Hill 856-428-5797, Blackwood 856-227-6262, Hammonton 609-567-2355 and Mays Landing 609-909-0700 or 1-800-922-1766. Check out their website: sjeyeassociates.com.

Read the full article at http://www.evergreeneditions.com/article/Restoring+Sight/2731128/390202/article.html.

For Folk’s Sake

Jeff Schwachter

From the music of Woody Guthrie to Bob Dylan, and from bluegrass to New Grass, author Michael Gabriele examines the history of New Jersey’s folk revival music in fascinating new book—interview inside.

Looking for “untold” stories is what drives author Michael Gabriele.

In the longtime journalist’s latest book, New Jersey Folk Revival Music: History & Tradition, his third for The History Press, the life-long Garden State resident, 1975 graduate of Montclair University, folk-music fan, and “recreational” tenor sax player, uncovers several (rollin’) stones related to the important role that New Jersey has played in shaping folk revival music into an art form.

Gabriele (un)covers terrific stories and information about the Garden State’s long history— over thousands of years’ worth—as it relates to folk music. From the traditional music of the Lenni-Lenape tribe in Bridgeton, and songs of Colonial-era taverns, to a “Guitar Mania” that swept the region in the early 1800s, Bob Dylan’s first meeting with folk icon Woody Guthrie in East Orange in 1961, and one of Dylan’s early appearances at the Camden Music Fair in 1963, Gabriele connects the dots between New Jersey and what he dubs “folk revival music.” Pinelands musicians and archivists, such as the original Pinehawkers, and Cumberland County’s own Jim Albertson; Paul Robeson; Pete Seeger; Joan Baez; John Gorka; Waretown’s Albert Music Hall and Camden’s old Victor recording studios are just some of the cast members in Gabriele’s fascinating new book, which explores southern New Jersey as well as its northern and central regions.

Gabriele will appear at Bogart’s Books & Café (103 N. High St., Millville) on Saturday, March 11, for a free book-signing event with the aforementioned folklorist, musician and radio personality Albertson.

Gabriele took some time to answer our questions prior to the event.

What was something that blew you away while you were working on this book?

The fact that Camden, N.J., (the old Victor Studios) was such an important hub for folk and folk revival music during the early years of the 20th century. Camden's role in the music was a revelation!

What prompted you to tackle the subject of the history of the folk music revival in New Jersey?

This is my third book published by The History Press. I considered various ideas to explore for a new book, but I kept coming back to folk music and the history here in New Jersey. When I did my “due-diligence” research, the more I investigated, the more I was convinced there was an important story to tell. … I’m a big fan of folk music; have been for many years [and] I think it’s fair to say that I approached the topic of N.J. folk music as “an outsider.”

My aim was to write a comprehensive, chronological narrative. Names, dates, places and events are important, but “the story” that connects everything is equally important. I’m always curious to learn about the “back-channel” story that illuminates how and why someone goes from Point A to Point B and then eventually ends up at Point C.

You mention that New Jersey’s earliest music dates back thousands of years to the Lenni-Lenape people. What are some of the earliest recordings?

The Lenni-Lenape have inherited musical traditions for dance and sacred rituals that go back thousands of years. These musical traditions have been handed down over the generations. As such, this is a process that describes “traditional” folk music—music handed down over the generations. It is an element of cultural anthropology that identifies an ethnic group or region, much like food, clothing, pottery, architecture, language, etc.

The earliest folk revival recordings took place at sessions held at the Victor Studios in Camden, NJ, 1915-1918. Cecil Sharp, a scholarly British folklorist, came to the United States to document folk tunes that traveled from England, Scotland and Ireland to “the New World” (America). He transcribed the songs and arranged to have them recorded at Victor. The work by Cecil Sharp marks the start of the “folk revival”— a rediscover of traditional tunes, which inspired 20th century musicians to compose new folk (revival) tunes.

You write about many milestones that have happened in New Jersey regarding folk revival music, what are some of the biggest ones?

The folk revival milestones I discovered convinced me that I needed to tell this untold story. Pioneers like Paul Robeson, the Carter Family and Jimmie Rogers all did their first commercial recordings at the Victor studios in Camden. Woody Guthrie recorded his first album (Dust Bowl Ballads, 1940) in…yes, the Victor studios in Camden! In 1965 Pete Seeger made arrangements to host and produce a UHF TV program named Rainbow Quest in Newark, NJ. In my view, these milestones certainly are part of the foundation for American folk revival music.

Bob Dylan has many deep connections to the Garden State. Anything you learned about these ties during your research?

Joan Baez and Bob Dylan [performed] at the Camden Music Fair on Aug. 3, 1963 (Joan was the headliner). Two weeks later, they performed together at Convention Hall in Asbury Park. And then, on Aug. 28, 1963, they performed on the steps of the Lincoln Memorial in Washington, DC, during the legendary “March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom.”

Dylan performed solo in New Jersey in November 1963 at Princeton University and Newark’s Mosque Theater. He connected with The Band in the summer of 1965, when the Band was performing in the Atlantic City/Wildwood music circuit.

Dylan’s most important connection to the Garden State occurred in late January/early February 1961, when he took the bus (from New York City) to East Orange, NJ, to meet his hero Woody Guthrie. Guthrie, at the time, was a patient at Greystone Park Psychiatric Hospital in Morris Plains. On weekends, his friends, Bob and Sidsel Gleason, would take Guthrie to their apartment in East Orange, which is where Dylan met him.

Aside from the work of people like Millville’s own Jim Albertson, how can the tradition of folk and folk revival music gain traction in the 21st Century and in the Digital Age?

I think the “traction” already exists, but there is a need for “stewardship” for the current generations of musicians and fans to sustain the music. I will say that, unfortunately, many NJ people aren’t aware of the folk music traditions we have. More outreach is needed. I hope that my book helps people in New Jersey (and beyond) realize that we have a major tradition and history regarding traditional folk and folk revival music. Important things happened here that shaped this musical genre. This is a source of Jersey Pride. It’s a living history, thriving today in village coffeehouses; in organizations like the Folk Project in Morristown, the NJ Friends of Clearwater, and the Princeton Folk Music Society; in popular venues like Albert Hall in Waretown and Tuckerton Seaport; and at the annual New Jersey Folk Festival and the Delaware Valley Bluegrass Festival.

(Read more excerpts from this interview at SNJToday.com)

Read the full article at http://www.evergreeneditions.com/article/For+Folk%E2%80%99s+Sake/2731133/390202/article.html.

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