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ALL CHURCHES IN THE DIOCESE OPEN FOR CONFESSION ON MONDAYS, 7 TO 8:30 P.M. SUSSEX THE AWARDWINNING NEWSPAPER OF THE R.C. DIOCESE OF PATERSON, N.J. PASSAIC MORRIS MARCH 9, 2017 Bishop Serratelli elects 193 catechumens 15 10 The Catholic Center for Evangelization at Bayley-Ellard A nnual event held on First S unday of Lent By CECILE PAGLIARULO REPOR TER SPIW YOUNG ADULT MINISTER HAS NEW CD 11 BISHOP DISTRIBUTES ASHES IN PATERSON HOSPITAL, SUCCASUNNA PARISH 6-7 8-9 14 15 16-23 DO NOT DELAY — TIME SENSITIVE NEWS V IEWPOINT Y OUTH O BITUARIES W HAT T O D O C LASSIFIEDS CLIFTON On the First Sunday of Lent in dioceses around the world, the annual Rite of Election took place. During the Rite of Election, catechumens moved a step closer to receiving Sacraments of Initiation — Baptism, Confirmation and Eu -charist — at the Easter Vigil on Holy Saturday, April 15. The Rite of Elec -tion is led by a diocese’s bishop, who, in the presence of the community, declares the Church’s approval of the catechumens so they may receive the Sacraments of Initiation and be wel-comed into full communion in the Roman Catholic Church. On March 5, the Diocese wel-comed 193 adults and children at the Rite of Election in St. Philip Church here where Bishop Serratelli formerly selected — or elected — them. These catechumens are now known as the elect. At the start of Mass, Bishop Serratelli spoke to the catechumens, BOOK OF THE ELECT One by one, directors of religious education, RCIA directors, parish representatives and priests BEACON PHOTO | JOE GIGLI came forward down the center aisle of St. Philip the Apostle Church in Clifton on the First Sunday of Lent, March 5, to present Bishop Serratelli with the names of the catechumens from their parish who were enrolled in the Book of the Elect for the Bishop to select during the Rite of Election. telling them: “On this First Sunday of Lent, we gather as a Church preparing for the Great Paschal Feast where the Church overflows with joy as she administers the Sacra -ments of Initiation to those who choose Christ and his Church for their life. We gather to welcome and enroll the elect. We are grateful for the gifts God has given them calling them to salvation.” DIOCESAN RITE OF ELECTION, 12 Families see benefits of Catholic home-schooling co-op By MICHAEL WOJCIK NE WS EDIT OR ROCKAWAY Faith Rose of Sacred Heart Parish here enjoys holding court for several hours each weekday around her dining-room table — the center of her ad-hoc classroom where she teaches her children, Michael, 8, Jeremy, 6, and Caeli, 4, academic subjects, as well as about their Catholic faith. All the while, she tries to fill them with a sense of wonder about God and the goodness of his creation in the warmth, comfort and love of what St. John Paul II has called “the domestic Church.” Welcome to the Rose household in Rockaway, which has been home-schooling its children by using a curriculum from Virginia-based Aquinas Learning — part of a local learning cooperative that the family formed with six other families in the Paterson Diocese and Newark Archdiocese. The faith-and fact-based curriculum has given the more than 20 local students enrolled a “clas-sically Catholic” approach to education — the way culture, tradition and truths have been trans-mitted down through the generations by I have the great minds, such as ability to tailor Aristotle, Plato, St. the lessons to Thomas Aquinas, St. the strengths Paul, and William Shakes peare. The al-and weaknesses so learn about faith: of each child. the liturgical year, the Here, the family saints, the Catechism is the source of and Catholic values. their values, not “With home-school -ing, the kids connect their peers.’ — E LIZABETH H ADI the information they are learning in one subject in other subjects because a central idea unifies each lesson. Each of my kids learns at his or her pace. Also, they learn from each other. ‘ They are inspired to learn,” said Rose, who also has two younger children: Benjamin, 2, and Kateri, six months. “Home-schooling is a calling for me. The benefits outweigh the challenges. I get to spend more time with them than if they were in school. I get to watch them grow, learn and flourish into the person God created them to be and to teach the values we want to teach them,” she said. So far, the two-year-old licensed center, oper-ated by Rose, has formed a co-op of seven families from Rockaway, Denville, Verona, Jersey City and Mahwah. Each family sets up school in their households, but they get together on Tuesdays in the former Sacred Heart School, Rockaway, for a Meet-Up Day, which starts the first day of their curriculum each week. They gather in a classroom setting and attend classes taught by a mentor with lessons on geography, history, sci-ence, philosophy, the Catechism, “Good Books,” INHOME CLASSROOM, 2

Bishop Serratelli Elects 193 Catechumens

Cecile Pagliarulo

Annual event held on First Sunday of Lent

CLIFTON On the First Sunday of Lent in dioceses around the world, the annual Rite of Election took place. During the Rite of Election, catechumens moved a step closer to receiving Sacraments of Initiation — Baptism, Confirmation and Eu - charist — at the Easter Vigil on Holy Saturday, April 15. The Rite of Election is led by a diocese’s bishop, who, in the presence of the community, declares the Church’s approval of the catechumens so they may receive the Sacraments of Initiation and be welcomed into full communion in the Roman Catholic Church.

On March 5, the Diocese welcomed 193 adults and children at the Rite of Election in St. Philip Church here where Bishop Serratelli formerly selected — or elected — them. These catechumens are now known as the elect.

At the start of Mass, Bishop Serratelli spoke to the catechumens, telling them: “On this First Sunday of Lent, we gather as a Church preparing for the Great Paschal Feast where the Church overflows with joy as she administers the Sacraments of Initiation to those who choose Christ and his Church for their life. We gather to welcome and enroll the elect. We are grateful for the gifts God has given them calling them to salvation.”

The catechumens have been studying tenets of Catholicism through their parish’s Rite of Christian Initiation of Adults (RCIA) program, the Church’s official process by which new members are prepared for the Sacraments of Baptism, Confirmation and Eucharist.

The children in the RCIA process, will be baptized while some (depending on their age) will also receive First Communion. Adults in the process will receive all three Sacraments of Initiation. In addition, along with the elect, candidates for First Communion and Confirmation will also receive these Sacraments at the Easter Vigil. At some parishes, those in the RCIA Confirmation program, will receive the Sacrament on Pentecost Sunday.

Delivering the homilies at the Rite of Election Sunday afternoon were two diocesan priests who were ordained last May by Bishop Serratelli. Father Dominik Bakowski, parochial vicar at St. Pius X Parish in Montville, gave the homily in English and Father Duberney Villamizar, parochial vicar at St. Anthony Parish in Passaic, who preached in Spanish.

In his homily, Father Bakowski told the catechumens, “You have been on a journey. A journey that began when you no longer could ignore the pulling in your soul that led you to search for Jesus. You presented your desire to your parish, and they encouraged you to explore the Catholic faith. During your journey you have learned more and more about the love that Jesus has for you. And now you are ready to take the next step, which is the final step.”

Following the homilies, the catechumens were presented to the Bishop and both the catechumens’ godparents and the congregation made an official affirmation of their worthiness for reception of the Sacraments of Initiation. Then, recognition of the enrolled names was presented to the Bishop in the Book of Elect. The catechumens were then asked to stand as an act of admission or election in becoming the elect.

Carrying the Book of Elect of parishes from around the Diocese where priests and religious education directors, who presented the Bishop with the names of those who were enrolled.

After the Rite of Election, a light reception was held in the auditorium of St. Philip Preparatory School where the newly-elected gathered. Many of them took the opportunity to take a photo with Bishop Serratelli.

Victoria Caruso, one of the newly-elect, has been preparing in the RCIA program at St. Jude Parish in Hopatcong. Growing up, she said there were two different faiths in her household — Jewish and Catholic but neither of her parents were active in practicing their faith. Her husband is Catholic, but it was the passing of her young daughter that made her want to become a fully initiated member of the Church. “The Church has brought me much love and guidance,” Caruso said. “I believe my daughter is my angel and it was God who helped me through this tough time.”

Also among the newly-elect, was Scott Mataya of St. Therese Parish in Succasunna. He said there were many different life events that made him decide to become Catholic. His wife is Catholic and they plan to have their son baptized in a few months. In addition, Mataya said his father’s passing also made him decide to become a Catholic. “I felt like I should be involved in the Church as well if my wife and son will be going to attend Mass,” he said. “Going through the process has really brought our family together.”

Newly-elected Luisa Parra will make her Confirmation at St. Anthony Church in Paterson, “I want to confirm my faith with God,” she said. “I hope to become a catechist once I receive Confirmation and pass on our faith to children.”

At the end of the Rite of Election, the Bishop said, “To the elect, be joyful. You’re presence is a sign that Christ is alive, the Church is growing and we will make a difference to make the world better.”

Read the full article at http://www.evergreeneditions.com/article/Bishop+Serratelli+Elects+193+Catechumens/2732164/390473/article.html.

Families See Benefits Of Catholic Home-Schooling Co-Op

Michael Wojcik

ROCKAWAY Faith Rose of Sacred Heart Parish here enjoys holding court for several hours each weekday around her dining-room table — the center of her ad-hoc classroom where she teaches her children, Michael, 8, Jeremy, 6, and Caeli, 4, academic subjects, as well as about their Catholic faith. All the while, she tries to fill them with a sense of wonder about God and the goodness of his creation in the warmth, comfort and love of what St. John Paul II has called “the domestic Church.”

Welcome to the Rose household in Rockaway, which has been home-schooling its children by using a curriculum from Virginia-based Aquinas Learning — part of a local learning cooperative that the family formed with six other families in the Paterson Diocese and Newark Archdiocese. The faith- and fact-based curriculum has given the more than 20 local students enrolled a “classically Catholic” approach to education — the way culture, tradition and truths have been transmitted down through the generations by great minds, such as Aristotle, Plato, St. Thomas Aquinas, St. Paul, and William Shakes peare. The also learn about faith: the liturgical year, the saints, the Catechism and Catholic values.

“With home-schooling, the kids connect the information they are learning in one subject in other subjects because a central idea unifies each lesson. Each of my kids learns at his or her pace. Also, they learn from each other.

They are inspired to learn,” said Rose, who also has two younger children: Benjamin, 2, and Kateri, six months. “Home-schooling is a calling for me. The benefits outweigh the challenges. I get to spend more time with them than if they were in school. I get to watch them grow, learn and flourish into the person God created them to be and to teach the values we want to teach them,” she said.

So far, the two-year-old licensed center, operated by Rose, has formed a co-op of seven families from Rockaway, Denville, Verona, Jersey City and Mahwah. Each family sets up school in their households, but they get together on Tuesdays in the former Sacred Heart School, Rockaway, for a Meet-Up Day, which starts the first day of their curriculum each week. They gather in a classroom setting and attend classes taught by a mentor with lessons on geography, history, science, philosophy, the Catechism, “Good Books,” civics, music, art, Latin and Greek.

Parents teach the curriculum, divided into three cycles of content, at the same time to three different ages levels: Schola Parva, prek to kindergarten; Schola Prima, grades 1 to 6; and Schola Alta, grades 7 to 12. All students study the same topics each week. Parents “teach ideas, so that the students can learn to discern truth and “facts in order to pass on information and practice skills, so that they will be able to apprehend and re-present the ideas they’ve learned,” according to Aquinas Learning on its website, aquinaslearning.org.

At home, Rose and her three oldest children work at the dining-room table, where she instructs them with guidance from workbooks in subjects, such as science, geography, history, Greek, civics and language arts. They learn math and writing every day. These lessons can involve completing workbook pages, discussion, researching, conducting handson projects, giving oral reports, reading great books aloud or learning catchy songs and chants to help remember important ideas, including the goodness of God and his creation, Rose said.

“Our schedule is flexible. I start early with the kids. We try to get to noon Mass at St. Mary Church in Denville. We might do other things together, like visit my grandmother, finish chores or run errands,” said Rose, who also noted that her children are able to take their schoolwork in the car and on vacations. “My children each have ageappropriate lessons, but they learn from each other. Caeli picked up information about cumulus clouds, the Ancient Egyptians and Emperor Justinian from the older boys. Sometimes, one child will become a distraction but it will be a good time to talk to him or her about Catholic virtues, Fruits of the Spirit and character,” she said.

An enthusiastic Michael Rose, a, fourthgrader, got excited, while telling an editor from The Beacon about his class schedule. “We are learning Greek, how to diagram sentences and divide numbers and about St. Leo, the U.S. Constitution and the planets and gravitational pull,” he said. “I like being home to learn. I like to learn about God. Learning about him brings me close to him,” he said.

Also, the Rose family brings the learning outside the home with field trips such as visiting cloistered religious sisters, said Rose.

At the Meet-Up Day, students engage in different types of activities together, such as playing, conducting science projects, reading aloud and learning various aspects of their subjects and faith. The day includes an optional opening rosary and noon Mass in the parish church. Many Aquinas members belong to another co-op, The Little Way, which offers drama, orchestra, gym, Theology of the Body, forensics and science instruction and meets on Fridays at St. Rose of Lima Parish in East Hanover.

Another mother, Elizabeth Hadi of Holy Rosary Parish, Jersey City, home-schools her children — Benjamin, 9, Jacob, 6, Oliver, 5, and Henry, 3 — at the dining-room table of the family’s two-bedroom apartment. “I love that I have the ability to tailor the lessons to the strengths and weaknesses of each child. Here, the family is the source of their values, not their peers [if they attended public school],” said Hadi, a mentor at Aquinas Learning Center, who noted that her kids enjoy learning about the liturgical year and the saint of the day. “This [Catholic home-schooling] is natural, because we as parents are teaching our kids information and values all the time to mold and guide them. We also are learning along with them. As role models, we are showing them that learning is lifelong process,” she said.

Read the full article at http://www.evergreeneditions.com/article/Families+See+Benefits+Of+Catholic+Home-Schooling+Co-Op/2732175/390473/article.html.

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