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SUSSEX THE AWARD-WINNING NEWSPAPER OF THE R.C. DIOCESE OF PATERSON, N.J. PASSAIC 7 CEILING OF PASSAIC CHURCH COLLAPSES ON HOLY THURSDAY MORRIS APRIL 20, 2017 8 2 The Catholic Center for Evangelization at Bayley-Ellard MASS OF THE LORD’S SUPPER AT ST. JUDE CHURCH, BUDD LAKE Passaic Women’s Center provides place for women to feel empowered By CECILE PAGLIARULO REPORTER 4 GOOD FRIDAY AT OUR LADY OF FATIMA CHURCH, PASSAIC A LLELUIA ! T HE L ORD I S R ISEN ! Ric Perez and John Jarocha, members of the choir at St Virgil Parish in Morris Plains, sing at the 10:30 A.M. Easter Sunday Mass, April 16, in St. Virgil Church at which Bishop Serratelli was the principal celebrant and homilist. For story and more photos of the celebration of the Resurrection of the Lord on Easter at St. Virgil’s please turn to page 11. VIGIL AT ST. JOHN 10 EASTER CATHEDRAL’S RODIMER CENTER St. Matthew Parish’s seniors take teens 8 W HAT T O D O 12-13 V IEWPOINT 14-19 C LASSIFIEDS under their wing during OWL event By MICHAEL WOJCIK NEWS EDITOR DO NOT DELAY — TIME SENSITIVE NEWS RANDOLPH John and Chris Groh, a senior citi-zen couple of St. Matthew the Apostle Parish, here talked fondly about how much they enjoyed taking with 16-year-old Hannah D’Olivera, a second-year Conformation candidate, during a recent afternoon at the church. They were impressed that the per-sonable sophomore at Randolph High School plays the bassoon — and also did so on a recent trip to Europe with the high school orchestra. The Grohs, who are active in several ministries at St. Matthew’s, and D’Olivera, were paired to-gether for a Mass of Anointing in the St. Matthew Church and then a luncheon in Heritage Hall. It was all part of the Morris County faith commu-nity’s annual Our Wise Leaders (OWL) Program. This year, the initiative joined together 54 Confirmation candidates with 50 seniors at the parish, where they not only were fed spiritually by the Eucharist and physically by the catered meal, but also were nourished by smiles, laughter and good conversation. “We learned that Hannah has a twin brother, HAPPY TOGETHER Kaitlyn Attinello spends time with her grandmother, Kathleen Nichols, during a recent event Our Wise Leaders (OWL) at St. Matthew the Apostle Parish in Randolph. John David, who was named John, after their fa-ther, and David, after the doctor who delivered them. We also learned that their family used to OWL, 9 PASSAIC When shy, timid women muster the courage to walk through the doors at the Passaic Neighborhood Center for Women in the former rectory of St. Nicholas Parish at 153 Washington Place, their lives are changed for the good. It is not by some majestic happening but by the sim-plicity of what the Center stands for — a peaceful and safe environment for women who live in the inner city to grow. The Passaic Neighborhood Center for Women first opened its doors in early fall 2013. It began with a simple concept, but its mission stood be-hind the idea that when women are empowered, the family is strengthened and when the family is strengthened, the world becomes a better place. The many collaborators among the religious or-ders in the Diocese who were involved in the cre-ation of the women’s cen-ter and serve in it, saw a great need in the inner city and moved forward with great faith and hope. The location of the center is significant. The city of Passaic is one of the poorest cities in the state with a poverty rate of more than three times the state average. Now, nearly four years later, the Center has had more than 3,000 visits from women living in Passaic. Many are the heads of their households and their families are living at the poverty level. They come to the Center with a strong desire to learn English in order to help them communicate with their children’s teachers and to help them with their homework, and most importantly, to be more employable. They come to learn how to be creative, by learning to paint, and make quilts and crocheted items. They come to garden in the backyard of the center to grow fresh veg-etables to feed their families healthy foods. They come to learn computer skills in the hope of find-ing a better paying job. They come for spiritual and moral support through the center’s ladies’ night programs and they come to learn more CENTER, 6

St. Matthew Parish’s Seniors Take Teens Under Their Wing During OWL Event

Michael Wojcik

RANDOLPH John and Chris Groh, a senior citizen couple of St. Matthew the Apostle Parish, here talked fondly about how much they enjoyed taking with 16-year-old Hannah D’Olivera, a second-year Conformation candidate, during a recent afternoon at the church. They were impressed that the personable sophomore at Randolph High School plays the bassoon — and also did so on a recent trip to Europe with the high school orchestra.

The Grohs, who are active in several ministries at St. Matthew’s, and D’Olivera, were paired together for a Mass of Anointing in the St. Matthew Church and then a luncheon in Heritage Hall. It was all part of the Morris County faith community’s annual Our Wise Leaders (OWL) Program. This year, the initiative joined together 54 Confirmation candidates with 50 seniors at the parish, where they not only were fed spiritually by the Eucharist and physically by the catered meal, but also were nourished by smiles, laughter and good conversation.

“We learned that Hannah has a twin brother, John David, who was named John, after their father, and David, after the doctor who delivered them. We also learned that their family used to live on our street when they were young children,” said John Groh, who with wife Chris, participated in OWL for the second year. They have five children and 15 grandchildren. “The young people were so comfortable speaking to us old-timers. We also had conversations about how technology has changed from back then to how it is now,” he said.

The OWL event on March 25 started with a Mass, where senior citizens were invited to receive the Sacrament of Anointing of the Sick. Father James Platania, St. Matthew’s weekend assistant and faculty member at Immaculate Conception Seminary at Seton Hall University, South Orange, and Msgr. Peter McHugh, a retired diocesan priest and former weekend assistant, celebrated the Mass. Father Dan Murphy, the pastor, “fully supports the program,” said Moira Dziomba, St. Matthew’s religious education director, who was among those that helped plan the event.

“OWL served as a witness to the attentiveness, reverence, respect and kindness between the second-year Confirmation candidates and the seniors, who attended,” Dziomba said. “Watching the teens at Mass, escorting their partners — some of them in walkers — to the altar to be anointed, was moving and beautiful. The teen readers and musicians were outstanding. When the poem ‘Standing on the Shoulders’ [which acknowledges the value and contributions of the older generations to the younger generations] was read, many a tear was shed,” she said.

After the Mass, the seniors and teens walked to Heritage Hall in the church building for the luncheon. There, they played Bingo; the younger people drew pieces of paper at their tables that contained questions to ask the older people to jump-start conversation, such as “What did you like to do when you were my age?” “What was your favorite job?” and “What is your favorite movie?”

At one table sat 16-year-old Abby Loveys, also of Randolph High School, who spoke with senior Ann Nichols, whose hobby is making pillows with a group of older adults. Lovelys said she talked about liking sports and “hanging with friends.”

“It was a nice conversation. Ann said that she didn’t like schoolwork. We bonded over that,” said Loveys, who noted that her OWL experience has inspired her to get more involved in community service. “It was a nice experience. The seniors were willing to talk with us. I think that grew into a good relationship with them. I realized that St. Matthew’s has a nice community and we bonded with that community. Everybody left in a good mood,” she said.

At his table, 16-year-old Brendan Spellman of Randolph High School, received powerful lessons in life and faith, during his conversation with a grandmother who escaped the Nazis during World War II. She fled her home in Italy with her family, he said.

“The elderly woman and her family struggled during World War II. She told me lots of stories about her young life. The Germans shelled her house. She thanked God that she was not in it,” Spellman said. “The woman talked about how faith has been important in her life. God helped her out. It made me count my blessings — living in America in a house in a time without any war. I learned a lot about her, but also about myself,” he said.

During the luncheon, a few Confirmation candidates showed off their music talents, playing and singing standards, which were popular in generations past. The teens — along with a team of volunteer parents — organized the event, which included decorating Heritage Hall in an owl theme, Dziomba said.

“The seniors love talking with the teens. The teens see who the seniors are and who they were,” Dziomba said. “The younger people also realize that the older people have a lot to offer, including that they are faithfilled — something to look up to.”

OWL — part of the candidates’ community service hours for Confirmation — started last year, under the guidance of Pat D’Amico, former religious education director of St. Matthew’s. It follows the parish’s legacy of hosting other events for seniors, including luncheons and retreats. Seniors in OWL are parishioners; residents of nearby Sunrise Assisted Living, who attend weekly Mass; or participants in the Women of Faith group or exercise programs at the parish, Dziomba said. “Conversation between the generations abounded and the happy sound of voices was palpable. The food was delicious and plentiful and Bingo was so much fun. Once again, this multi-generation event was declared a great success,” Dziomba said.

Read the full article at http://www.evergreeneditions.com/article/St.+Matthew+Parish%E2%80%99s+Seniors+Take+Teens+Under+Their+Wing+During+OWL+Event/2766657/402162/article.html.

Passaic Women’s Center Provides Place For Women To Feel Empowered

Cecile Pagliarulo

PASSAIC When shy, timid women muster the courage to walk through the doors at the Passaic Neighborhood Center for Women in the former rectory of St. Nicholas Parish at 153 Washington Place, their lives are changed for the good. It is not by some majestic happening but by the simplicity of what the Center stands for — a peaceful and safe environment for women who live in the inner city to grow.

The Passaic Neighborhood Center for Women first opened its doors in early fall 2013. It began with a simple concept, but its mission stood behind the idea that when women are empowered, the family is strengthened and when the family is strengthened, the world becomes a better place. The many collaborators among the religious orders in the Diocese who were involved in the creation of the women’s center and serve in it, saw a great need in the inner city and moved forward with great faith and hope. The location of the center is significant. The city of Passaic is one of the poorest cities in the state with a poverty rate of more than three times the state average.

Now, nearly four years later, the Center has had more than 3,000 visits from women living in Passaic. Many are the heads of their households and their families are living at the poverty level. They come to the Center with a strong desire to learn English in order to help them communicate with their children’s teachers and to help them with their homework, and most importantly, to be more employable. They come to learn how to be creative, by learning to paint, and make quilts and crocheted items. They come to garden in the backyard of the center to grow fresh vegetables to feed their families healthy foods. They come to learn computer skills in the hope of finding a better paying job. They come for spiritual and moral support through the center’s ladies’ night programs and they come to learn more about their rights and the immigration process, along with paths to citizenship.

All these opportunities for these women would not be possible without the generous contributions and pledges made to Partners in Faith, the diocesan capital and endowment campaign, which in addition to supporting the Passaic Women’s Center, also supports diocesan Catholic Charities, parishes, Catholic school children, retired priests healthcare and the renovations to the Diocese’s mother church, the Cathedral of St. John the Baptist in Paterson.

“We are so very grateful to the Partners in Faith donors for their generosity,” said Sister of Christian Charity Ann Marie Paul, the Center’s director, since its inception. “Without them, the Passaic Neighborhood Center for Women could not exist. When undertaking a new venture such as the Center, it’s possible to focus on growing the ministry or raising funds. It is very difficult to do both at the same time. Because of Partners in Faith, we could focus on growing this muchneeded ministry because the ‘seed money’ was already in place.”

The Women’s Center has a lot of “partners in faith” at work to make it a success. Open Mondays through Fridays, assisting Sister Ann Marie is Franciscan Sister Elaine Maguire, part-time associate director, and Sister of Christian Charity Gerardine Tantsits, part-time administrative assistant. Since its opening 34 volunteers, mostly religious sisters, college students and laywomen, have served the center leading the workshops and being a support team for the women.

One of the volunteers is Sister of Charity Patricia Reynolds, who has taught quilting at the Center since it opened. The class has been so well received that, in November 2015, the quilters held a “Christmas Boutique” selling items they had made. The proceeds of the sale — more than $3,000 — went to the women who made the items. There was a unanimous agreement among the women to use their profits to purchase their own sewing machines. Several of the women have begun to sell quilted items made at home. They hope that soon they can have an online presence and sell their handcrafted items on the Internet.

While quilting is a popular class, the most requested class is English as a Second Language (ESL). It is taught at various levels, eight times a week. Those who participate in the face-to-face classes can supplement and fast-track their English language skills by using Rosetta Stone software, given to the Center through a grant from the Sisters of Charity of St. Elizabeth.

Two young women, who came to the U.S. from Peru to join their families in Passaic, can attest to the success of the ESL classes at the Center. In addition to the education they received at a local institution in the morning, they came to the Center four afternoons per week for the ESL classes. Recently, one of them received a high score in the test of English as a Foreign Language. Because of her test scores, she was able to be accepted at a local community college where she is studying nursing.

Sister Ann Marie said, “The women who visit the Center tell us that they appreciate the peaceful atmosphere when they walk through the door. They are motivated to learn because they are in classes exclusively with other women. In a co-educational setting, they are afraid to speak up — or many times, the men dominate the discussion. Here at the Center, they are taught by women and they learn with women. That makes a big difference in their participation.”

The Center was represented at the recent Diocesan Women’s Conference held at St. Paul’s Inside the Walls in Madison. Sister Ann Marie was one of the three keynote speakers and the Center sponsored a table with crocheted and quilted items for sale made by the women. Sister Ann Marie has also been a very visible spokesperson for the Center at many parishes around the Diocese giving talks, and leading missions and retreats.

Looking toward the future, Sister Ann Marie noted because of its exponential growth, the Center will require an expanded location within the next two years. “We have always planned based on the needs expressed by the women. Right now, that means we have at least one ‘Know Your Rights’ I'm - migration workshop each month. Before they expressed a need for these workshops, we had been planning to show them how to sell their handcrafted items online and to educate them about setting up a small business. We hope to be able to begin to do this in the spring,” she said.

[This is part of a series of stories on how Partners in Faith is strengthening the life of the Church in the Paterson Diocese.]

Read the full article at http://www.evergreeneditions.com/article/Passaic+Women%E2%80%99s+Center+Provides+Place+For+Women+To+Feel+Empowered/2766661/402162/article.html.

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