Background Image

The Episcopal New Yorker Episcopal New York_Winter 2016 : Page 6

A SSI ST A N T B I SH O P ’ S M E SSA G E Sanctuary By the Rt. Rev. Mary D. Glasspool ecause I grew up in a rectory, owned (for all intents and purposes) by the church where my father was the rector, the first definition I learned of the word sanctuary had directly to do with the church building. The sanctuary was the holy place where the altar was, as distinct from the chancel (where, thankfully enough, the choir actually sat in stalls), and the nave, where the congregation gath-ered. Sanctuary was and is a holy place. In Jewish history the word referred to the temple building in Jerusalem where the ark of the covenant was kept. And Christianity used the word similarly. In the European Middle Ages, the right of sanctuary developed as a means of asy-lum for criminals or those accused of crimes to find safety and at least temporary immunity from arrest in churches or other sacred places. For over a thousand years the right of a criminal to protection within the walls of a consecrated church was uni-versally accepted in western Europe. While the practice was limited and finally abol-ished in the early 17th century, the idea of churches and other sacred spaces as places of refuge—especially for those considered unfairly oppressed—continued. A more recent manifestation of the Sanctuary Movement occurred in the United States during the 1980s and 1990s. It is still an understatement to write that it was a very complicated time, as many of us remember! Suffice it to say that there were many people from Central America fleeing to the United States in fear of losing their lives, for political as well as economic reasons. And the United States through its immigra-tion policies severely limited the granting of asylum to many, who in some cases were deported and then disappeared or were tortured and killed. B T oday, with an estimated 11.4 million undocumented immigrants living in the U.S.—8 million of them a part of the work force—and an anticipated stricter enforce-ment of immigration laws with the possible result of large deportations and separa-tions of families, the concept of sanctuary has taken on new life. Many cities, counties, and even a few states have declared themselves Sanctuary cities/counties/states, gener-ally meaning that law enforcement officials in the particular locale have been instruct-ed not to request documentation from people with whom they engage. At its recent Diocesan Convention, the Diocese of Los Angeles passed a resolution declaring itself a Sanctuary Diocese (what that means is here: http://www.pasadenanow.com/main/ episcopal-diocese-becomes-sanctuary-diocese/). Over the next several weeks, we, in the Diocese of New York, will be developing guidelines for our congregations who feel called to respond, especially to the immi-grants in their midst. W e do so during the time when we honor in our Christian story the One born in the refuge of a manger, whose family fled for his life, took asylum in Egypt, and returned to Nazareth only when it became safe. It is our goal and desire to share these guidelines in early 2017. If you have any questions, comments, or sugges-tions, please send them to me at bpglasspool@dioceseny.org. In the Name of the One born into our midst, I wish you a joy filled Christmas Season. El Santuario Por la Revdma. Obispa Mary D. Glasspool P orque crecí en una rectoría, la cual pertenecía (para todos los efectos) a la igle-sia donde mi padre era el rector, la primera definición que aprendí de la palabra santuario tenía que ver directamente con el edificio de la iglesia. El santuario era el lugar santo donde estaba el altar, distinto del presbiterio (afortunadamente, donde realmente el coro se sentaba en las butacas), y la nave, era donde se reunía la congre-gación. El santuario era y es un lugar santo. En la historia judía, la palabra se refer-ía al edificio del templo en Jerusalén, donde se guardaba el Arca de la Alianza. Y el cristianismo usó la palabra de manera similar. En la Edad Media europea, el derecho de santuario se desarrolló como un medio de asilo para los delincuentes o los acusados de delitos para encontrar seguridad y por lo menos inmunidad temporal de arresto en iglesias u otros lugares sagrados. Durante más de mil años el derecho de un criminal a la protección dentro de los muros de una iglesia consagrada fue universalmente aceptado en Europa Occidental. Si bien la práctica fue limitada y finalmente abolida a principios del siglo XVII, la idea de que las iglesias y otros espacios sagrados eran lugares de refu-gio—especialmente para aquellos que se consideran injustamente oprimidos— continuó. Una manifestación más reciente del Movimiento del Santuario ocurrió en los Estados Unidos durante los años 80 y 90. T odavía más, es disminuirle importancia al suceso, cuando se escribe que fue un tiempo muy complicado, ¡como muchos de nosotros recordamos! Baste decir que hubo mucha gente de América Central que estaba huyendo a los Estados Unidos por temor a perder sus vidas, tanto por razones políticas como económicas. Y Estados Unidos a través de sus políticas de inmigración limitó severamente la concesión de asilo a muchos, que en algunos casos fueron deportados y luego desaparecieron o fueron torturados y asesinados. 6 THE EPISCOPAL NEW YORKER Hoy, con un estimado de 11,4 millones de inmigrantes indocumentados que viven en los EE.UU. —8 millones de ellos forman parte de la fuerza de trabajo— y anticipándose a una aplicación más estricta de las leyes de inmigración con el posi-ble resultado de grandes deportaciones y separaciones de familias, el concepto de santuario ha adquirido nueva vida. Muchas ciudades, condados e incluso algunos estados se han declarado ciudades / condados / estados del Santuario, lo que gen-eralmente significa que se han dado instrucciones a los oficiales que aplican la ley en el lugar en particular para que no soliciten la documentación de la gente con la cual participan. En su reciente Convención Diocesana, la Diócesis de Los Ángeles aprobó una resolución declarándose Diócesis del Santuario (lo que esto significa se encuentra aquí: http://www.pasadenanow.com/main/episcopal-diocese-becomes-sanctuary-diocese/). Durante las próximas semanas, nosotros, en la Diócesis de Nueva York, estaremos creando pautas para las congregaciones nuestras que se sientan llamadas a responder, especialmente, a los inmigrantes entre ellos. Lo hacemos durante el tiempo cuando honramos en nuestra historia cristiana a Aquel que nació en el refugio de un pesebre, cuya familia huyó por su vida, se asiló en Egipto y regresó a Nazaret sólo cuando fue seguro. Nuestra meta y deseo es compartir estas pautas a principios del 2017. Si tiene preguntas, comentarios o sugerencias, por favor envíemelos a bpglasspool@diocese-ny.org. En el Nombre del Nacido entre nosotros, les deseo una Navidad llena de alegría. Traducido por Sara Saavedra www.episcopalnewyorker.com Winter 2016

Sanctuary

By the Rt. Rev. Mary D. Glasspool

Because I grew up in a rectory, owned (for all intents and purposes) by the church where my father was the rector, the first definition I learned of the word sanctuary had directly to do with the church building. The sanctuary was the holy place where the altar was, as distinct from the chancel (where, thankfully enough, the choir actually sat in stalls), and the nave, where the congregation gathered. Sanctuary was and is a holy place. In Jewish history the word referred to the temple building in Jerusalem where the ark of the covenant was kept. And Christianity used the word similarly.

In the European Middle Ages, the right of sanctuary developed as a means of asylum for criminals or those accused of crimes to find safety and at least temporary immunity from arrest in churches or other sacred places. For over a thousand years the right of a criminal to protection within the walls of a consecrated church was universally accepted in western Europe. While the practice was limited and finally abolished in the early 17th century, the idea of churches and other sacred spaces as places of refuge—especially for those considered unfairly oppressed—continued.

A more recent manifestation of the Sanctuary Movement occurred in the United States during the 1980s and 1990s. It is still an understatement to write that it was a very complicated time, as many of us remember! Suffice it to say that there were many people from Central America fleeing to the United States in fear of losing their lives, for political as well as economic reasons. And the United States through its immigration policies severely limited the granting of asylum to many, who in some cases were deported and then disappeared or were tortured and killed.

Today, with an estimated 11.4 million undocumented immigrants living in the U. S.—8 million of them a part of the work force—and an anticipated stricter enforcement of immigration laws with the possible result of large deportations and separations of families, the concept of sanctuary has taken on new life. Many cities, counties, and even a few states have declared themselves Sanctuary cities/counties/states, generally meaning that law enforcement officials in the particular locale have been instructed not to request documentation from people with whom they engage. At its recent Diocesan Convention, the Diocese of Los Angeles passed a resolution declaring itself a Sanctuary Diocese (what that means is here: http://www.pasadenanow.com/main/ episcopal-diocese-becomes-sanctuary-diocese/).

Over the next several weeks, we, in the Diocese of New York, will be developing guidelines for our congregations who feel called to respond, especially to the immigrants in their midst. We do so during the time when we honor in our Christian story the One born in the refuge of a manger, whose family fled for his life, took asylum in Egypt, and returned to Nazareth only when it became safe. It is our goal and desire to share these guidelines in early 2017. If you have any questions, comments, or suggestions, please send them to me at bpglasspool@dioceseny.org.

In the Name of the One born into our midst, I wish you a joy filled Christmas Season.

Read the full article at http://www.evergreeneditions.com/article/Sanctuary/2675888/371988/article.html.

El Santuario

Por la Revdma. Obispa Mary D. Glasspool

Porque crecí en una rectoría, la cual pertenecía (para todos los efectos) a la iglesia donde mi padre era el rector, la primera definición que aprendí de la palabra santuario tenía que ver directamente con el edificio de la iglesia. El santuario era el lugar santo donde estaba el altar, distinto del presbiterio (afortunadamente, donde realmente el coro se sentaba en las butacas), y la nave, era donde se reunía la congregación. El santuario era y es un lugar santo. En la historia judía, la palabra se refería al edificio del templo en Jerusalén, donde se guardaba el Arca de la Alianza. Y el cristianismo usó la palabra de manera similar.

En la Edad Media europea, el derecho de santuario se desarrolló como un medio de asilo para los delincuentes o los acusados de delitos para encontrar seguridad y por lo menos inmunidad temporal de arresto en iglesias u otros lugares sagrados. Durante más de mil años el derecho de un criminal a la protección dentro de los muros de una iglesia consagrada fue universalmente aceptado en Europa Occidental. Si bien la práctica fue limitada y finalmente abolida a principios del siglo XVII, la idea de que las iglesias y otros espacios sagrados eran lugares de refugio— especialmente para aquellos que se consideran injustamente oprimidos— continuó.

Una manifestación más reciente del Movimiento del Santuario ocurrió en los Estados Unidos durante los años 80 y 90. Todavía más, es disminuirle importancia al suceso, cuando se escribe que fue un tiempo muy complicado, ¡como muchos de nosotros recordamos! Baste decir que hubo mucha gente de América Central que estaba huyendo a los Estados Unidos por temor a perder sus vidas, tanto por razones políticas como económicas. Y Estados Unidos a través de sus políticas de inmigración limitó severamente la concesión de asilo a muchos, que en algunos casos fueron deportados y luego desaparecieron o fueron torturados y asesinados.

Hoy, con un estimado de 11,4 millones de inmigrantes indocumentados que viven en los EE.UU. —8 millones de ellos forman parte de la fuerza de trabajo— y anticipándose a una aplicación más estricta de las leyes de inmigración con el posible resultado de grandes deportaciones y separaciones de familias, el concepto de santuario ha adquirido nueva vida. Muchas ciudades, condados e incluso algunos estados se han declarado ciudades / condados / estados del Santuario, lo que generalmente significa que se han dado instrucciones a los oficiales que aplican la ley en el lugar en particular para que no soliciten la documentación de la gente con la cual participan. En su reciente Convención Diocesana, la Diócesis de Los Ángeles aprobó una resolución declarándose Diócesis del Santuario (lo que esto significa se encuentra aquí: http://www.pasadenanow.com/main/episcopal-diocese-becomessanctuary- diocese/).

Durante las próximas semanas, nosotros, en la Diócesis de Nueva York, estaremos creando pautas para las congregaciones nuestras que se sientan llamadas a responder, especialmente, a los inmigrantes entre ellos.

Lo hacemos durante el tiempo cuando honramos en nuestra historia cristiana a Aquel que nació en el refugio de un pesebre, cuya familia huyó por su vida, se asiló en Egipto y regresó a Nazaret sólo cuando fue seguro.

Nuestra meta y deseo es compartir estas pautas a principios del 2017. Si tiene preguntas, comentarios o sugerencias, por favor envíemelos a bpglasspool@dioceseny. Org.

En el Nombre del Nacido entre nosotros, les deseo una Navidad llena de alegría.

Traducido por Sara Saavedra

www.episcopalnewyorker.com

Read the full article at http://www.evergreeneditions.com/article/El+Santuario+/2675891/371988/article.html.

Previous Page  Next Page


Publication List
Using a screen reader? Click Here